Connect with us

Tech

Samsung’s Galaxy S20 raises the bar for phones in 8 ways

Published

 on

Samsung offers the Galaxy S20 in three models.

 


Sarah Tew/CNET

The Samsung Galaxy S20 comes in three different permutations. There’s the 6.2-inch Galaxy S20, the 6.7-inch S20 Plus and the huge 6.9-inch S20 Ultra. All three phones are now available for preorder. Last week, Samsung unveiled these new flagships along with its new foldable phone, the Galaxy Z Flip, which will compete directly with the new Motorola Razr.

While the Z Flip has grabbed headlines, the new Galaxy S20 phones have bigger competition in mind — Apple’s iPhone, Google’s Pixel and Huawei’s high-end devices — the phones a lot more people will actually buy in 2020. And to Samsung’s credit, the highest-end model of the new Galaxy S20 has done eight things that have raised the bar for flagship phones:

1. Introduces a 100x zoom camera.
2. Takes 108-megapixel photos.
3. Integrates two forms of 5G: Sub 6 (standard) and millimeter-wave (super fast).
4. Adds a 120Hz AMOLED display for better video and gaming.
5. Offers 8K video recording.
6. Increases battery capacity to 5,000 mAh.
7. Includes a 25-watt fast charger in the box (and supports a new 45-watt charger).
8. Debuts “Single Take” mode to capture 10 photos and four videos with the push of one button.

 

Why did Samsung skip from S10 to S20?

Last year’s flagship Samsung phones were the Galaxy S10 and S10 Plus, preceded by the S9 and S9 Plus in 2018. The 2020 models are the S20, S20 Plus and S20 Ultra. So why has Samsung skipped from S10 to S20 in its branding, and why are there three models this year?

The 20 in S20 refers to 2020 — Samsung decided to swap from version numbers to years. All of the phone-makers take liberties in the numbers they use to name their products, but this move makes Samsung one of the first to tie the product name to the year, which has some practical appeal. It also doesn’t hurt that the number is higher than the product number of most of its rivals, and human brains naturally tend to think bigger numbers are better.

In terms of the Galaxy S20 lineup having three devices this year, that’s technically one less than 2019 when Samsung had the S10 and S10 Plus but also added the smaller S10E (a budget device) and the slightly larger S10 5G. This year, Samsung has integrated 5G across the entire product line so it doesn’t need a separate 5G model. And, it has followed Apple’s lead in giving the least expensive device in the lineup the standard branding — iPhone 11 for Apple last fall and Galaxy S20 for Samsung this year.

It will be important to watch whether the Galaxy S20 becomes the most popular model in Samsung’s lineup the way the iPhone 11 has become the favorite among Apple buyers. I expect the middle model, the S20 Plus, will be the one most people buy. Let’s talk about why.

samsung-galaxy-s20-s10-note-10samsung-galaxy-s20-s10-note-10
Samsung’s Galaxy S10, Galaxy Note 10 and Galaxy S20.

 


Angela Lang/CNET

How do the three Samsung S20 models differ?

Let’s get the basics out of the way. The Galaxy S20 models are three different screen sizes and prices:

  • Galaxy S20 (6.2-inch), which starts at $1,000 in the US, £799 in the UK and AU$1,349 in Australia
  • Galaxy S20 Plus (6.7-inch), which starts at $1,200 (£999, AU$1,499)
  • Galaxy S20 Ultra (6.9-inch), which starts at $1,400 (£1,199, AU$1,999)

Preorders for all three models start Feb. 21 and arrive in stores on March 6. (March 13 for the UK.)

The Galaxy S20 includes only the Sub 6 version of 5G, which offers broad coverage but no speed bursts over 1 gigabit per second. The Galaxy S20 Plus and S20 Ultra offer both Sub-6 and mmWave, which includes those massive speed bursts in select areas. (There’s one exception here: Verizon is planning to release a special version of the standard Galaxy S20 in the second quarter of the year that will include mmWave.)

Samsung redesigned its camera system for all three phones to improve low-light photos, sharpness and zoom — the three things people have asked for the most in Samsung’s research. The new Galaxy S20 and S20 Plus cameras have 64 megapixels and the S20 Ultra has an eye-popping 108-megapixel camera. These high resolutions will potentially improve the clarity of the photos, but keep in mind that they’re stitching together multiple images from multiple lenses to get those high megapixel numbers. So these megapixels are not directly comparable to the megapixel numbers on DSLR and mirrorless cameras, for example.

 

The other big upgrade to the cameras is with the optical zoom, where Samsung has gone farther than its competitors. The Galaxy S20 and S20 Plus get a 30x zoom and the S20 Ultra gets a 100x “hybrid optic zoom” — which doubles the 50x digital zoom on the Huawei P30 Pro. The S20 Ultra uses what Samsung calls a “folded zoom lens” and company representatives explained that it folds sideways to the right of the lens on the back camera bump. That sounds pretty innovative and I’m looking forward to learning more about how they pulled this off. Look for my colleague Andy Hoyle’s deep dive on the new S20 cameras soon.

Samsung has also expanded battery capacity and here’s how the three models measure up:

  • Galaxy S20: 4,000 mAh
  • Galaxy S20 Plus: 4,500 mAh
  • Galaxy S20 Ultra: 5,000 mAh

Speaking of power, all Galaxy S20 models come with a 25-watt fast charger in the box and the S20 Ultra also has an optional 45-watt super fast charger you’ll be able to buy separately. By comparison, the iPhone 11 Pro models pack an 18-watt fast charger.

All the S20 models are likely going to need that extra battery and fast charging to help power the new 120Hz AMOLED display, which makes video and gaming much smoother when there’s motion on the screen. It also makes images more crisp. Most of today’s phones have 60Hz screens, while the OnePlus 7 Pro and the Google Pixel 4 have 90Hz. Apple’s iPad Pro offers 120Hz.

Another way to take advantage of the 120Hz AMOLED screen is that all three S20 models offer 8K video recording at 24 frames per second, so the new display makes a great viewfinder. Once recorded, those 8K videos can also be cast to a Samsung 8K QLED or exported to YouTube, which supports 8K video. With the new camera system in the S20, Samsung has also introduced a new “Night Hyperlapse” mode that can make light streaks out of cars in motion, for example. This is one of the features I’m most looking forward to trying out.

All three phones come equipped with 12GB of RAM. The standard Galaxy S20 comes with 128GB of storage, while the S20 Plus and the S20 Ultra offer 128GB and 256GB options.

For the rest of the specs on the three S20 models, see this chart:

Galaxy S20, S20 Plus and S20 Ultra specs

Samsung Galaxy S20 Samsung Galaxy S20 Plus Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra
Display size, resolution 6.2-inch AMOLED 6.7-inch AMOLED 6.9-inch AMOLED
Pixel density 563ppi 525ppi 511ppi
Dimensions (Inches) 2.72 x 5.97 x 0.311 in 2.9 x 6.37 x 0.30 in 2.99 x 6.57 x 0.35 in
Dimensions (Millimeters) 69.1 x 151.7 x 7.9 mm 73.7 x 161.9 x 7.8mm 76.0 x 166.9 x 8.8mm
Weight (Ounces, Grams) 5.75 oz; 163g 6.56 oz; 186g 7.76 oz; 220g
Mobile software Android 10 Android 10 Android 10
Camera 12-megapixel (wide-angle), 64-megapixel (telephoto), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide) 12-megapixel (wide-angle), 64-megapixel (telephoto), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide), time-of-flight camera 108-megapixel (wide-angle), 48-megapixel (telephoto), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide), time-of-flight camera
Front-facing camera 10-megapixel 10-megapixel 40-megapixel
Video capture 8K 8K 8K
Processor 64-bit octa-core processor (Max 2.7GHz + 2.5 GHz + 2.0 GHz) 64-bit octa-core processor (Max 2.7GHz + 2.5 GHz + 2.0 GHz) 64-bit octa-core processor (Max 2.7GHz + 2.5 GHz + 2.0 GHz)
Storage 128GB 128GB, 512GB 128GB, 512GB
RAM 12GB 12GB 12GB, 16GB
Expandable storage Up to 1TB Up to 1TB Up to 1TB
Battery 4,000 mAh 4,500 mAh 5,000 mAh
Fingerprint sensor In-screen In-screen In-screen
Connector USB-C USB-C USB-C
Headphone jack No No No
Special features 5G enabled; 120Hz refresh rate; water resistant (IP68) 5G enabled; 120Hz refresh rate; water resistant (IP68) 5G enabled; 120Hz refresh rate; 100X zoom; water resistant (IP68)
Price off-contract (USD) $999 $1,199 $1,399
Price (GBP) £799, £899 (5G) £999 (5G) £1,199 (128GB), £1,399 (512GB)
Price (AUD) AU$1,349, AU$1,499 (5G) AU$1,499, AU$1,649 (5G) AU$1,999 (128GB), AU$2,249 (512GB)

First impressions of the Galaxy S20 Ultra

On paper, the Galaxy S20 Ultra is a beast — and even the two smaller models still hold their own among today’s flagship phones. But the best phone experiences aren’t made on paper, they’re made with devices in our hands.

The most noticeable thing when you put any of the three Galaxy S20 devices in your hand is that Samsung has gently decreased the curves on the edges of the screen that were first introduced with the Galaxy S7 Edge. That will hearten some users who complained that they often mistakenly brushed the curved edges of the screen and rarely used the edge features. I was never one of those, but I also rarely used the edge features. Still, the curved edges gave Samsung phones the illusion of being even thinner than they already were, and so the curves were a powerful design feature. That said, the slightly less curved S20 models maintain that feel but are also a little easier to hold.

Speaking of holding the S20 Ultra, I’ve been a long-time fan of phablets. Since the beginning of 2010, I’ve carried two phones — a work phone and a personal phone, one Android and one iPhone. And for the past three to four years that has almost always meant carrying two phablets. But even for me, the 6.9-inch S20 Ultra feels a little oversized, bulky and difficult to get into my pocket.

With the 100x zoom on the S20 Ultra, there’s no way around the fact that the camera bump has suddenly gotten much bigger. When you run your finger along the back of the device without a case on it, brushing that camera bump is definitely jarring. When you slip the S20 Ultra into any of the Samsung-branded cases for the device, however, the bump sits flush with all of them. And since 75% to 80% of smartphone users put their phones in cases, it’s not something that bothers me very much. However, my colleague Lynn La had a strong negative reaction to the bump, and others might feel the same — especially if they don’t use a case.

13-samsung-galaxy-s20-ultra-zoom-213-samsung-galaxy-s20-ultra-zoom-2
The big camera bump on the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra is the trade-off for the 100x zoom.

 


Sarah Tew/CNET

In terms of using the 100x zoom, when I zoomed all the way in and took some photos the images were pretty pixelated and the edges of things were pretty jagged. It looked a lot like the photos when the 10x digital zoom is maxed out on most other cameras — it just goes a lot farther. But when you gear down that 100x zoom to 30x or 50x, you get some excellent quality images and still have spectacular range for a phone camera.

Finally, I’d like to talk about my favorite new feature of the Galaxy S20. It doesn’t have to do with any of the gaudy specs or hardware. It’s a software feature — and that’s surprising considering software has never been a strength of Samsung devices. The new feature is called “Single Take” mode and it uses the different lenses on the S20 models along with machine learning to help you get the best photo or video of a situation without having to think about it.

When there’s suddenly something interesting happening, just tap the shutter button in Single Take mode and the phone will grab a variety of images and videos and you can sort out afterward which ones you want to keep. At max, one tap of the button in Single Take mode can capture 10 photos and four videos. For example, the photos could be “AI best moment,” ultrawide, live focus, AI filter and smart crop, while the videos could be forward/backward, fast forward and original video.

 

Single Take was the feature I tested the most in my hands-on time with the Galaxy S20 Ultra. I had a lot of fun with it and I liked what I saw, but it will take a lot more usage to decide if it’s something I would use often and if it would help me fully capture moments I would have otherwise missed. But I like what Samsung’s trying to do here, because it could make phone photography more fun and more effective at the same time.

Originally published last week.

Source link

Continue Reading

Tech

OnePlus 10T vs. Google Pixel 6: Should you spend $649 or $599? – Digital Trends

Published

 on


In the market for the latest flagship? Comparing specs to choose the perfect phone can be a chore, and if you’re struggling to choose between the new OnePlus 10T and Google Pixel 6, we hear you. With its stunning 6.7-inch AMOLED 120Hz display, powerful Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 chipset, and 4,800mAh battery with 125W SuperVOOC charging, the OnePlus 10T seems like a no-brainer. But what about the Google Pixel 6’s Tensor chip, wireless charging, and outstanding cameras?

We’ve compared the OnePlus 10T vs. Google Pixel 6 across six core categories to help you decide which to buy, so keep reading to figure out which is best for you.

Specs

OnePlus 10T Google Pixel 6
Size 163 x 75.37 x 8.75mm (6.42 x 2.97 x 0.34 inches) 158.6 x 74.8 x 8.9mm (6.24 x 2.94 x 0.35 inches)
Weight 203.5 grams (7.18 ounces) 207 grams (7.30 ounces)
Screen size 6.7-inch Fluid AMOLED with 60 to 120Hz adaptive refresh rate 6.4-inch OLED with 10 to 90Hz adaptive refresh rate
Screen resolution 2412 x 1080 (394 ppi) 2340 x 1080 pixels (411 ppi)
Operating system Android 12

OxygenOS 12.1

Android 12
Storage 128GB, 256GB 128GB, 256GB
MicroSD card slot No No
Tap-to-pay services Google Pay Google Pay
Processor Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 Google Tensor
RAM 8GB, 16GB 8GB
Camera 50MP main, 8MP ultrawide, 2MP macro, 16MP front 50MP wide, 12MP ultrawide rear, 8MP front
Video

4K at 30 fps/60 fps

1080p at 30 fps/60 fps

4K at 30 fps/60 fps,

1080p at 30 fps/60 fps

Bluetooth version Bluetooth 5.3 Bluetooth 5.2
Ports USB-C USB-C
Fingerprint sensor Yes (in-display) Yes (in-display)
Water resistance IP54 IP68
Battery 4,800mAh

150W SuperVOOC charging (capped at 125W in the U.S.)

4,614mAh

30W wired charging

21W wireless charging

Reverse wireless charging

App marketplace Google Play Store Google Play Store
Colors Moonstone Black, Jade Green Stormy Black, Kinda Coral, Sorta Seaform
Prices Starting at $649 Starting at $599
Review score 3 out of 5 stars 4 out of 5 stars

Design, display, and durability

Joe Maring/Digital Trends

At a glance, these two phones have very different designs. The OnePlus 10T’s design has a clear resemblance to the stylish OnePlus 10 Pro, though the lack of an alert slider means it looks a lot more like an Oppo phone than other devices in the series. Weighing just 203.5 grams, it’s fairly light for its size compared to the heavier Pixel 6, which weighs in at 207 grams and is also slightly chunkier at 8.99mm thick, giving it a substantial feeling in your hand.

The OnePlus 10T has Gorilla Glass 5 on the back and covering the screen, but underneath is a plastic chassis — an odd choice for a phone at this price point. In contrast, the Pixel 6 looks a lot like the Pixel 6 Pro, boasting a glass and metal body with a Gorilla Glass 6 rear panel. Using both phones side-by-side, the Pixel 6 feels noticeably more premium — largely thanks to the aluminum frame compared to the 10T’s plastic one. Furthermore, the glass back on the Pixel 6 is also nicer. The OnePlus 10T’s back is glass, but it has a distinctly cheap feeling (especially on the black model).

The OnePlus 10T has a distinctive camera bump visible to the rear, notably missing the Hasselblad branding of recent OnePlus phones — and in this iteration, the selfie camera has relocated to the center of the screen. There’s an in-display fingerprint sensor, and the phone gets a rather paltry splashproof IP54 rating, while the Pixel 6 boasts a much more comprehensive IP68 rating.

Back of the Pixel 6.
Andy Boxall/Digital Trends

There are two colors to choose from with the OnePlus 10T. The first is the basalt-textured Moonstone Black, which is the one seen in most photos and shines differently depending on how the light hits it. You can also get Jade Green, which also looks nice but boasts a smooth, ceramic-like finish that doesn’t feel as premium as you might expect. Moonstone Black does a good job keeping fingerprints to a minimum, whereas Jade Green puts them on full display. When it comes to Pixel 6 color choices, Sorta Seafoam is a pretty minty green, Kinda Coral is, as its name suggests, an eye-catching (though muted) coral shade, while Stormy Black is, well, black.

Moving to the display, the OnePlus 10T’s 6.7-inch Fluid AMOLED FHD+ display boasts 2412 x 1080 (394 ppi) resolution, with an adaptive 60Hz-120Hz refresh rate. In comparison, the Google Pixel 6’s display measures just 6.4 inches with a 2340 x 1080 (411 ppi) resolution and has a 10-90Hz refresh rate. In practice, you shouldn’t notice much difference between the two phones’ refresh rates, but if you’re into your mobile games, the OnePlus 10T’s faster refresh rate may be a wiser choice — even though the lower adaptive refresh rate on the Pixel 6 may provide a better battery life boost. One other downside to the Pixel 6 is its overall brightness. If you spend a lot of time outside and need your screen to get as bright as possible, the 10T is the better choice.

This is one we have to give to the Google Pixel 6. It feels significantly nicer to hold than the 10T does, the distinct design looks great, and the more rugged IP protection is a big deal for anyone worried about getting their phone wet or near sand. The 10T might be a better choice if you really want a larger display with a 120Hz refresh rate, but overall, we think the Pixel 6 makes the better design decisions.

Winner: Google Pixel 6

Performance, battery life, and charging

There are several noticeable differences between the two phones when it comes to performance, battery life, and charging. The OnePlus 10T is powered by Qualcomm’s latest Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 chip, which is actually a more powerful processor than that of the OnePlus 10 Pro (and more battery-friendly too). There’s also 8GB or 16GB of RAM on offer, though 16GB feels a bit like overkill. The focus here is on horsepower — in fact, the OnePlus 10T feels like a gaming phone in terms of performance.

In contrast, the Pixel 6 packs Google’s Tensor chip, the same processor as the Pixel 6 Pro. This chip has an eight-core CPU and prioritizes efficiency with lightning-fast performance. You “only” get 8GB of RAM here, but that’s more than enough.

When it comes to storage, the two phones are identical, both offering 128GB or 256GB variants with no microSD card slot. Bear in mind this means the storage you choose is all you’ll ever have, so if you’re the type who never deletes anything, opt for the 256GB model on either phone.

How about battery life? The OnePlus 10T packs a beefy 4,800mAh battery with up to 150W SuperVOOC charging. Note that speeds top out at 125W in the U.S., as most outlets don’t offer enough power for 150W speeds, though traveling with your U.S.-bought phone will get you 150W charging elsewhere. Whether you’re charging at 150W or 125W, expect to go from 0% to 100% battery in around 20 minutes. In practice, it’s very impressive.

In contrast, the Pixel 6 has a slightly smaller 4,614mAh battery that should still see you through a day of average use with some left in the tank. We found that we were left with around 60% battery after three hours of screen-on time. There’s only 30W charging on offer here, but you do get 21W wireless charging and reverse wireless charging as a nice bonus. Sadly, there’s no charger in the box.

We’re giving this round to the OnePlus 10T, though it’s very close. With its Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 chip, extra RAM, beefy battery, and 125W fast charging, it just pips the Pixel 6 to the crown — even though there’s no wireless charging. If you can’t live without wireless charging and you don’t mind a slightly smaller battery and slower charging speeds, the Pixel 6 might be the better choice for you.

Winner: OnePlus 10T

Camera

Pixel 6 camera module.
Andy Boxall/Digital Trends

The differences between these two phones are perhaps most noticeable when it comes to cameras. The OnePlus 10T packs a triple-camera array on the rear, with a 50MP main lens, 8MP ultrawide, and 2MP macro shooter. There’s also a 16MP front camera. Unlike the OnePlus 10 Pro, there are no Hasselblad-tuned cameras on the 10T. The main camera takes perfectly good shots (though struggles a bit indoors and in low light), but the end results don’t look quite as good as the OnePlus 10 Pro. Likewise, the 8MP ultrawide delivers just fine photos, while the 2MP macro camera is really just there for looks. There’s Super HDR for high-contrast shots, and Nightscape 2.0 for improved night-time captures, too.

In contrast, the Google Pixel 6 packs the same 50MP main and 12MP wide-angle cameras as the Pixel 6 Pro, plus an 8MP selfie cam. The main camera delivers excellent results, with Action Pan and Long Exposure camera modes, plus the option to use Magic Eraser in Google Photos. Google’s digital zoom is decent and lets you shoot at up to 7x, while the selfie cam also delivers good results. The Pixel 6’s cameras capture great photos effortlessly in any light, at any time of day — something we can’t really say about the OnePlus 10T.

What about video? With the OnePlus 10T, you can capture 4K video at 30/60 frames per second (fps) and 1080p at 30/60 fps. The Pixel 6 is capable of those same modes, and it also comes with slo-mo video at 240fps.

Does the OnePlus 10T have the worst camera system we’ve ever used? Not at all. But when compared side-by-side with the Pixel 6, there’s no question about which one we’d recommend to shutterbugs. The Pixel 6 easily takes this round.

Winner: Google Pixel 6

Software and updates

Pixel 6 screen.
Andy Boxall/Digital Trends

Both the 10T and Pixel 6 ship with Android 12, though their approach to the software is very different. Android 12 on the OnePlus 10T is heavily customized with OxygenOS 12.1. While OxygenOS used to be hailed as one of the best third-party Android interfaces available, it’s devolved into a lesser state with the current 12.1 version. From missed notifications, inconsistent touch responsiveness, and heavy inspiration from ColorOS for the aesthetics, it’s a shell of what OxygenOS used to be.

The Pixel 6, on the other hand, has one of the best Android experiences available today. It’s fast, uncluttered, and filled with helpful features. Want your phone to automatically detect and show you what song is playing in the background? The Pixel 6 can do that. Want the Google Assistant to hold your spot in line during phone calls? It does that, too.

OnePlus has promised a solid three years of updates and four years of security patches for the OnePlus 10T. While great, this is still some way behind Google and Samsung’s promises of up to five years of security updates. The Pixel 6 gets three years of OS updates and five years of security patches.

With its better take on Android 12 and longer software support, this is another win that goes to the Pixel 6.

Winner: Google Pixel 6

Special features

Both phones have their own takes on special features. Both have 5G, although the OnePlus 10T only supports sub-6GHz 5G, not mmWave. The Pixel 6 supports both sub-6 and mmWave 5G in the U.S., though handsets sold in the U.K. only support sub-6 5G. It’s worth noting here that the Pixel 6 has been plagued with connectivity issues and switching between 4G, 5G, and Wi-Fi can be glitchy, with even a restart sometimes failing to solve the problem.

The OnePlus 10T and Pixel 6 each pack an in-display fingerprint sensor, but the 10T’s is noticeably better. It’s fast, reliable, and works when you want it to. Comparatively, the Pixel 6’s fingerprint sensor has become notorious for being slow and unresponsive.

Neither phone has a microSD card slow, so the storage you get is all you’ll ever have. There’s also no 3.5mm headphone jack on offer across either phone, but that’s pretty standard.

This round’s really too close to call. If you’re in the U.S. and need mmWave 5G, the Pixel 6 may be the best choice for you, but otherwise, neither phone has any special features that make it stand out.

Winner: Tie

Price and availability

The OnePlus 10T is launching with a starting price of $649 in the U.S. for the 8GB/128GB version. In the U.S., the phone is available to pre-order on September 1 from the OnePlus Store, Amazon, or Best Buy, and on sale on September 29. The Google Pixel 6 is available right now from the Google store, starting from $599 for the 128GB version. You can also buy it from other retailers such as Amazon or Best Buy.

Overall winner: Google Pixel 6

If we’re making a broad recommendation about which phone to get, our pick is the Google Pixel 6. It has a nicer design than the 10T, better waterproofing, much more reliable cameras, wireless charging, more enjoyable software, and is even $50 cheaper than the OnePlus 10T. Google Tensor isn’t the fastest chipset, and the 90Hz display isn’t the best we’ve ever seen, but they’re still perfectly enjoyable and reliable throughout daily use.

So, who’s the OnePlus 10T for? If you absolutely need the fastest chipset available and are OK sacrificing a few other features for ultra-fast wired charging, the 10T delivers on its performance promises. But in the quest to achieve breakneck performance, it ends up sacrificing a few important things along the way. It’s certainly not a bad smartphone, but we think most people are better off with Google’s handset.

Editors’ Recommendations




Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Tech

What do you want to see at Samsung's August Unpacked event – MobileSyrup

Published

 on


Samsung’s upcoming August 10th Unpacked event is quickly approaching, with devices like the Galaxy Fold 4, Galaxy Flip 4, Galaxy Watch 5 and the Galaxy Buds 2 Pro on the way.

This week’s Community Question is: what are you most excited to see at the keynote?

I’m a big fan of foldables and especially the Galaxy Fold lineup, so naturally, I’m excited to see the Fold 4. This year’s handset will reportedly sport an improved camera setup, which was one of the Fold 3’s only downsides. Additionally, we expect up to 16GB of RAM, a Qualcomm Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 chip and an improved under-display camera.

[embedded content]

I’m also hoping to see a tease of something entirely new. A previous rumour indicated that Samsung will show off another mysterious foldable at this Unpacked event. That doesn’t seem like the case anymore based on recent rumours, but there’s still a possibility we might catch a glimpse of an entirely new device.

Either way, we’ll need to wait until August 10th to see what’s coming. For more on Samsung’s foldable-focused Unpacked, check out my story that outlines everything I expect to see at the event.

Let us know in the comments below what you are most excited to see at Samsung’s upcoming Unpacked.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Tech

OnePlus 10T goes on sale in India – GSMArena.com news – GSMArena.com

Published

 on


The OnePlus 10T unveiled a few days ago is now available for purchase in India through Amazon.in and OnePlus’s official Indian website. It comes in Moonstone Black and Jade Green colors with two memory options – 8GB/128GB and 12G/256GB, priced at INR49,999 ($630/€620) and INR54,999 ($690/€680), respectively. There’s also a variant with 16GB RAM and 256GB storage onboard, but that’s not available in India.

The OnePlus 10T is powered by the Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 SoC and runs Android 12-based OxygenOS 12 out of the box. It’s built around a 6.7″ 120Hz FullHD+ AMOLED screen with a fingerprint reader underneath for biometric authentication and a punch hole for the 16MP selfie camera.

Around the back, we have a 50MP primary camera, joined by 8MP ultrawide and 2MP macro units.


OnePlus 10T

OnePlus 10T

The OnePlus 10T packs a 4,800 mAh battery with 150W wired charging, but it can only go up to 125W in North America.

The rest of the OnePlus 10T’s highlights include 5G connectivity, USB-C, stereo speakers, and NFC. You can read our OnePlus 10T hands-on review here to learn more about it.

Also, while the OnePlus 10T is already available for purchase in India, the smartphone is still on pre-orders in Europe, with shipments beginning on August 25. Pre-bookings in the US begin on September 1, and the device will start shipping on September 29.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending