Connect with us

News

Sandra Oh, Donovan Bailey among dozens appointed to Order of Canada

Published

 on

Film and TV actress Sandra Oh and track champion Donovan Bailey are among dozens of performers, athletes, advocates and experts newly named to Canada’s highest civilian honour.

Gov. Gen. Mary Simon announced 85 appointees to the Order of Canada on Wednesday, touting luminaries in fields including film, music, science, politics, business, academics, sport and culture.

“Grey’s Anatomy” and “Killing Eve” star Oh was named an officer to the Order of Canada for her stage and screen success, while Bailey was named an officer for his track and field excellence and philanthropic commitment to youth and amateur athletes.

“For me, I just want to be a great example for young Canadians that they themselves can follow into my footsteps,” Bailey said when reached ahead of the announcement in Vancouver.

“Hopefully, I was one of those positive people who (inspire others to) believe that Canada should be positive and Canada should be confident and Canada can take on anybody and come out golden.”

Film director/screenwriter François Girard of Montréal and Angela James of Richmond Hill, Ont., who was one of the first superstars of women’s hockey, were also named officers for high degree of achievement or service to Canada.

New members of the order — who are honoured for distinguished service to a particular community or field — include Toronto music industry veteran Al Mair; former MP Nancy Uqquujuq Karetak-Lindell of Arviat, Nunavut; and HIV/AIDS researcher Martin T. Schechter of Vancouver.

Karetak-Lindell says she was just five years old when she began thinking about how she could serve her small northern community.

Sixty years later, she can look back on a career of public service that includes working for the region’s council and education authority and as a Liberal member of Parliament from 1997 to 2008.

“I come from a family that was taught to help others and to do it with care and love and respect, without looking to be recognized for it. So to think that people feel that I have deserved to be given this Order of Canada is a real honour,” she said when reached in Arviat.

“And of course being Inuk it means that much more with the Governor General of today being an Inuk, too.”

One of 10 children, Karetak-Lindell says she was encouraged to respect others and never forget where she was from. She credits role models including her uncle and Inuit leader Tagak Curley; her father, who was a special constable with the RCMP; and her mother, “a woman before her time” who served on local councils and organizations dominated by men.

“Our community is one of people who constantly try to help their fellow person. And that is the environment that I grew up in, along with my parents’ influence. But this community always makes me feel that I could do more because they so believe in me to be able to do whatever I want to do,” she said.

Mair earns his honour after working in the music industry since the age of 12 when he sold records in a music store after school.

He went on to help grow the Canadian scene by helping launch various careers, including that of singer-songwriter Gordon Lightfoot, whom he managed for eight years. Mair also led several music organizations including the Canadian Independent Music Association and the independent label Attic Records.

He traces his passion to Expo 67 in Montreal, a spectacular world fair that marked Canada’s centennial and showcased homegrown talent.

“I was convinced the Canadian artists could be at least equal to artists from any other country in the world, if not superior, and I always felt that way,” said Mair, whose label roster included Lee Aaron, Triumph, Maestro Fresh-Wes, the Nylons, and Haywire.

“There was a lot of negativity among broadcasters that Canadian artists were second-rate and weren’t good enough. It was a real challenge to convince the broadcasters and it took literally decades before Canadian artists were fully accepted by the broadcast industry.”

Other recipients announced Wednesday include Dr. William Clark of London, Ont., a nephrologist who researched the long-term health consequences of Canada’s worst-ever E. coli contamination in Walkerton, Ont., in 2000; and Hereditary Chief Stephen Joseph Augustine of Elsipogtog First Nation, N.B., for advancing Mi’kmaq studies and awareness.

Recipients will be presented with their insignia at a later date in Ottawa, depending on their availability. Rideau Hall hosts an average of four investiture ceremonies a year.

Honorees get a silver insignia shaped like a six-pointed snowflake with a red annulus in the middle and a royal crown above. It also features a stylized Maple Leaf with the order’s motto: Desiderantes Meliorem Patriam, which means, “They desire a better country.”

Created in 1967, the Order of Canada recognizes outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation. More than 7,600 people from all sectors of society have been invested.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 29, 2022.

 

Cassandra Szklarski, The Canadian Press

News

International support for miners rescue was ‘heartwarming,’ says company president

Published

 on

OTTAWA — The recent successful rescue of two miners trapped in a mine in the Dominican Republic for more than a week was made possible thanks to support from the international community including direct assistance from the Royal Canadian Air Force, according to the president of the company at the centre of the incident.

Paul Marinko, head of the Dominican Mining Corporation known as Cormidom, said Canada played a critical role in transporting equipment that was ultimately used to help liberate the men from the Cerro de Maimón operation.

The miners’ ordeal saw Gregores Mendez and Carlos Yepez spend 10 days trapped 31 metres under the surface from July 31 to Aug. 9.

Marinko said domestic support for the rescue effort was strong, with Dominican President Luis Abinader calling every day to check in on the status of the rescue and various government departments providing direct support on the ground.

But he said experts from the U.S., Canada and the U.K. were also involved, and the Canadian government played a key role in obtaining and providing equipment for the rescue operation.

“It was heartwarming to actually see that response,” Marinko said in a Zoom interview.

Marinko said the company swung into action immediately after the “fall of ground” that left the miners confined in a 400-square-meter space. Within 15 hours of the incident, he said crews involved in the rescue had established a hole through which they delivered water, food, walkie-talkies, entertainment and a light source.

Nonetheless, Marinko said the experience would have been terrifying for the two men.

The miners eventually reported rising water levels that eventually reached waist level, but Marinko says they were able to pump the water out at a speed six times the rate of the inflow.

“You could imagine being trapped, seeing rising water and knowing that rescue is not going to be quick. So they went through some terrifying moments,” he said.

After assessing what equipment would be needed to safely rescue the miners, Marinko said the company began trying to track it down abroad.

Machines Rogers International, a mining company based in Val D’Or, Que. agreed to lend the necessary machinery to Cormidom and the Dominican government got in touch with Ottawa for assistance in transporting the gear.

“The problem for us was to transport … was just beyond our resources, we didn’t have the capacity to do that,” Marinko said.

The Royal Canadian Air Force transported the mining excavation system to the Dominican capital of Santo Domingo on Aug. 7. Two days later, the miners were rescued with assistance from a team sent over by Machines Rogers International.

Defence Minister Anita Anand issued a tweet on Tuesday thanking the Royal Canadian Air Force personnel involved in the mission.

“To our aviators – you make Canadians proud, and we are grateful for your service,” Anand wrote.

Marinko said the two miners were released from hospital on Thursday and are now with their families.

The rescue comes after the collapse of a coal mine in Mexico that left 15 miners trapped, with five escaping with injuries. Rescue divers’ first attempts to reach the remaining 10 miners failed, Mexican authorities said on Thursday.

“I think of those poor men trapped in Mexico,” Marinko said. “We were lucky.”

The cause of the incident at Cerro de Maimón is currently under investigation and the underground mine is temporarily closed.

“When the authorities and more importantly, when I’m satisfied it’s safe, we’ll go back in,” Marinko said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 14, 2022.

 

Nojoud Al Mallees, The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

News

One dead & 40 injured at Medusa Festival in Spain

Published

 on

Cullera, Spain- One person has been confirmed dead, a 22-year-old male, and 40 injured after the main entrance and the main stage of the Medusa Festival collapsed in the wee hours of Saturday.

According to Spain‘s paramilitary police unit, the stage collapsed due to a strong gust of wind which had reached more than 51mph (82kmh).

In addition, the Valencia section of Spain’s national weather service (AEMET) said that warm breezes were producing very strong gusts of wind and abrupt increases in temperature. At one point the temperature was a blistering 40.5 Celsius (104.9 degrees Fahrenheit) at the Alicante-Elche airport, just south of the concert site.

Videos posted on social media early Saturday showed strong winds and structures falling from the stage as large crowds of festival attendees were evacuated. The videos also showed the moment when the venue’s structures, including the main stage, fell on people in the front rows.

“A terrible accident that shocks all of us. I want to extend my deepest condolences to the family and friends of the young man who died early this morning at the Medusa Festival in Cullera,” said Ximo Puig, president of the Valencia regional government.

Meanwhile, organizers of the festival, which was supposed to see a total of 320 000 attendees over three days from Friday through Sunday, said they are completely devastated and dismayed at what happened this morning and said they had suspended the festival.

“At around four in the morning, unexpected and violent strong winds destroyed certain areas of the festival, forcing management to make the immediate decision to vacate the concert area to guarantee the safety of attendees, workers and artists.

Unfortunately, the devastating meteorological phenomenon led some structures to cause unexpected consequences. All our support and affection for those affected in these difficult and sad times.

Due to inclement weather occurring in the early hours of Aug. 13, 2022, and with the aim of guaranteeing the security of the concert-goers, workers and artists gathered at the Medusa Festival, the festival organization suspends its activity for the time being.

The festival site is cleared as a preventative measure with the aim of facilitating the work of the emergency and security services at the Medusa Festival,” said the organizers in a statement.

There were about 50 000 people at the festival site when the incident happened, and it took 40 minutes to evacuate people from the site.

Continue Reading

News

Quebec towns protecting right to serve residents in English after new language law

Published

 on

MONTREAL — Quebec’s new language law has dozens of municipalities in the province shoring up their bilingual status, with few considering giving up the right to serve their citizens in both English and French.

Almost 90 cities, towns or boroughs in Quebec are considered officially bilingual, a designation allowing them to offer services, post signage and mail communications in the country’s two official languages. Jurisdictions without this status must communicate only in French, with few exceptions.

Bill 96, the new language law that came into effect June 1, proposes that a municipality’s bilingual status be revoked in places where fewer than 50 per cent of citizens have English as a mother tongue. However, a bilingual town or city can avoid losing its status by passing a resolution within 120 days of receiving notice from the province.

Scott Pearce, the mayor of the township of Gore, north of Montreal, said choosing to remain bilingual was an easy decision for his town of just over 1,700 people.

“We were founded here by the Irish in the 1800s, so it’s part of our history — speaking English and English culture,” he said in a recent interview.

While the percentage of residents in Gore who speak English as a mother tongue has dropped from over 50 per cent to around 20 per cent, he said maintaining bilingualism is popular among French-speaking and English-speaking citizens alike.

Language, he said, “has never been an issue here.”

Pearce, who represents bilingual municipalities at the province’s federation of towns and cities — Fédération Québécoise des municipalités — said most of the mayors he’s spoken with plan on passing similar resolutions, or have already done so.

“I talked to mayors from all over the province, and they’re really proud of the bilingual status and how their communities — English and French — get along,” he said.

While Bill 96 has been criticized by groups representing English-speakers, Pearce, who is married to a sitting legislature member, says he believes that in this instance, the governing party has done the towns a favour by giving them an easy way to formalize their status.

The Canadian Press reached out to all the bilingual municipalities and boroughs to ask them whether they have passed, or plan to pass, a resolution to keep their status. Of more than two dozen that responded, all but three said they intended to remain bilingual. The others said they were still studying the law or declined to comment. None said they planned to give up being considered officially bilingual.

A spokesperson for the province’s language office, the Office québécois de la langue française, said in an email that notices would be sent “shortly” to towns that no longer meet the 50 per cent threshold.

While they can offer services in English, “a municipality recognized as bilingual must nevertheless ensure that its services to the public are available in the official language of Quebec, French,” Nicolas Trudel wrote in an email.

The official purpose of Bill 96 is to affirm that French is Quebec’s only official language and “the common language of the Québec nation.” But four mayors who spoke to The Canadian Press by phone, as well as many of those who responded by email, all said the decision to operate in two languages was unanimous among city council and raised little to no debate among citizens.

“I believe the French language is already protected, and well protected,” said Richard Burcombe, the mayor of Town of Brome Lake, in Quebec’s Eastern Townships. “They don’t need to eliminate services to the English population to protect the French language.”

He said his town, which falls below the 50 per cent threshold, hasn’t yet passed a resolution but will do so once it receives a notice.

Kirkland, a city in the Montreal area, described bilingualism as a “core value in all aspects of municipal life,” while Ayer’s Cliff, Que., in the Eastern Townships, said it was “essential to the character of the municipality and as testimony to the historical presence of the two communities, anglophone and francophone.”

Otterburn Park, a town 40 kilometres east of Montreal, said it wanted to keep its bilingual status despite only 5.7 per cent of its population reporting English as a mother tongue in the last census.

“The English-speaking population is largely made up of seniors,” Mayor Mélanie Villeneuve wrote in an email.

“With a view to providing quality service, particularly to more vulnerable groups of people, we believe it is important to be able to communicate with English-speaking citizens in the language that works for them.”

Several of the mayors expressed hope that the choice to remain bilingual would be accepted as permanent and that they wouldn’t have to pass new resolutions every time there’s a census.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 14, 2022.

 

Morgan Lowrie, The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Trending