Connect with us

Sports

Saturday Night Live Delayed Due to Notre Dame vs. Clemson Game – ComicBook.com

Published

 on


UPDATE: Notre Dame bested #1 Clemson 47-40. Saturday Night Live is now set to begin airing around 12:15 p.m. Eastern. The story as it originally appeared is below.

Due to an overtime game between two of the nation’s top football teams, Saturday Night Live has been delayed. A game between Clemson — the top-rated team in the nation — and #4 Notre Dame quickly found its way to overtime after finishing regulation after finishing 33-33. Unfortunately for all involved, tonight’s Saturday Night Live has been the most anticipated episode in recent memory, due in part to its relation to the 2020 United States general election and its surrounding discourse.

The episode also features Dave Chappelle in his second hosting gig on the live sketch show, with Foo Fighters as musical guest. As the game headed into its second overtime, announcers revealed Saturday Night Live will air 30 minutes after the end of the game, so local stations could air their typical news broadcasts.

Saturday Night Live typically airs Saturday nights on NBC beginning at 11:30 p.m. Eastern.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Sports

Blue Jays: Two interesting names emerge from non-tenders – Jays Journal

Published

 on


The MLB non-tender deadline passed with 56 players being non-tendered by their respective teams, however, a couple of names should be of some interest to the Toronto Blue Jays.

The Blue Jays also were involved in the action yesterday non-tendering both Travis Shaw and reliever A.J. Cole. Former reliever Ryan Tepera also saw himself let go by the Chicago Cubs amidst all the movement around the league.

There are a number of familiar somewhat unlikely names that saw themselves non-tendered including Kyle Schwarber, Eddie Rosario, Adam Duvall, Maikel Franco, Nomar Mazara, and Carlos Rodon to name a few.

However, it is outfielder David Dahl formerly of the Colorado Rockies, and pitcher Archie Bradley that Toronto should focus their sights on in the coming days. Both players still have some upside and could improve the Blue Jays 2021 contingent at their respective positions.

Dahl is just 26 and a former first-round selection, 10th overall in the 2012 amateur draft. The young outfielder battled injuries early on in his career but managed to play 100 games in 2019. Dahl hit .302/.353/.524 with 48 extra-base hits including 15 home runs and 61 runs batted in for the Rockies.

Last season, the outfielder struggled offensively hitting just .183/.222/.247 with no homers in 24 games. His overall body of work in the majors doesn’t represent last season’s stat line, Dahl is a career .286/.334/.494 hitter with 38 home runs and a 0.9 WAR in 264 games over four seasons in the majors.

Dahl is typically a corner outfielder but does have 71 games in centrefield on his resume including 40 games in 2019. The Blue Jays have been in search of someone who can step in and take over the centrefield responsibilities on an everyday basis.

The outfielder earned $2.475 million last season and was not earmarked to hit free agency until 2024 prior to his non-tendering.

Pitcher Archie Bradley is another name that the brain trust should be prioritizing on their offseason to-do list. For some reason, the Cincinnati Reds did not want to keep the reliable reliever in their plans for 2021 and I personally don’t get it.

The 28-year old hurler has both starting and relief experience and can also close out games accumulating 28 saves in his career this far. Last season, he sported a 2.95 earned run average with six saves and an 8.8 SO/9 rate in 16 games with the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Reds.

The Reds acquired Bradley at the trade deadline last season and he posted an impressive 1.17 earned run average in six relief appearances leading to his non-tendering. The right-hander earned $4.1 million last season and would still be considered a value even with a raise for the 2021 campaign.

In 2019, Bradley went 4-5 with a 3.52 earned run average and 18 saves while fanning 87 in 71.2 innings of work for the Diamondbacks. He is still a serviceable backend of the bullpen arm who can consistently get major league hitters out.

The Blue Jays could benefit from landing either of these two talents, both have enjoyed success at the major league level and have some upside still left in the tank.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Sports

Is Westbrook for Wall a lose-lose deal for all involved? – theScore

Published

 on


In a blockbuster akin to a couple teams rearranging expensive deck chairs on a sinking ship, the Houston Rockets traded Russell Westbrook to the Washington Wizards for John Wall and a future first-round draft pick. Here’s what the deal means for the parties involved:

Rockets take another step back

Rob Carr / NBA / Getty Images

Westbrook’s on-court value may not match the monetary value of his contract, and he’s two years older than Wall, but Wall arrives in Houston on an equally burdensome deal, and with far more questions to answer about his current standing in the league.

Opening week of the coming season will mark two full years since Wall last appeared in an NBA game. The five-time All-Star underwent left heel surgery in January 2019, which led to an infection. While dealing with that already complicated recovery, a slip and fall at his home resulted in a ruptured Achilles. Wall’s also had surgery on both knees in the past, and missed 41 games the season before his heel and Achilles injuries.

It’s fair to say no one was lining up to take on the $131.5 million remaining on Wall’s contract, which includes a player option worth more than $46.8 million in 2022-23.

Westbrook’s contract also has three years and $131.5 million remaining, with the only difference being Wall will make about $200,000 less this season, while Westbrook’s 2022-23 player option is $200,000 cheaper. If the Rockets believe they can eventually flip Wall before his option season, then owner Tilman Fertitta – whose earned a reputation for penny-pinching – will save a couple hundred grand in this deal, with Houston also recouping a (protected) first-rounder in the process.

That’s fine if you assume this is a precursor to a James Harden trade that will fully launch the Rockets into a rebuild, but if the team remains committed to competing in the short term in order to keep Harden in Houston, which appears the case, this trade makes a lot less sense.

Wall’s no more of an off-ball threat than Westbrook was. Of the 263 players in NBA history who’ve attempted as many 3-pointers as Wall, Westbrook’s 3-point percentage of 30.5 ranks 259th. Wall’s 32.4% conversion rate ranks 247th. In addition, the last time Wall was healthy, he was logging more time with the ball in his hands than any player besides Harden.

Over a five-year run of All-Star campaigns from 2013 through 2018, Wall averaged roughly 20 points, 10 assists, four rebounds, and two steals, and was a more consistent defensive player than Westbrook’s ever been. But expecting a high-usage point guard – whose greatest attribute is his speed – to be the same player at 30 after an Achilles rupture seems like wishful thinking.

Best-case scenario: Wall remains an explosive star who can replace some of what Westbrook brought to the table last season during a three-month stretch when Westbrook got back to being the rim-rampaging guard he was at his peak. If Wall can do that while offering a tiny bit more shooting, more off-ball movement, and a greater defensive focus, this feels like a wash for Houston.

The realistic scenario: The Rockets simply swapped a bad contract (Westbrook) for a terrible contract (Wall), and will still pair Harden with an ill-fitting backcourt mate who’s a worse player than Westbrook is. The only win here is the future draft pick.

The sting of that reality is more excruciating when you consider that just last year, Houston surrendered two first-rounders and two more pick swaps to turn Chris Paul – a better player, on a shorter contract, who actually fit beside Harden – into Westbrook.

That’s the kind of backwards asset management that turns contenders into pretenders.

Wizards move up a tier

Ned Dishman / NBA / Getty Images

Speaking of asset management: Washington trading Wall means the club got zero games played from its former franchise player since Wall’s lucrative extension kicked in last year.

Still, in a deal with no clear winner, the Wizards are certainly the lesser loser.

Westbrook was the better player when both stars were at their peak, and he’s certainly the safer bet now that Wall’s become such an injured and uncertain commodity.

After contracting COVID and dealing with a quad injury, Westbrook was a shell of himself during the summer restart. But with the Rockets going small and a clearer runway to attack in the paint, Westbrook averaged 30.7 points, eight rebounds, 6.8 assists, and 1.7 steals on nearly 51% shooting over a span of 34 games between early December and early March last season.

While Westbrook’s off-ball issues are well documented, and even though his taking the ball out of Bradley Beal’s hands will be detrimental for Washington when Westbrook falls in love with his nonexistent jumper, he and Beal will immediately become one of the NBA’s most dynamic backcourts should Westbrook play to his strengths, as he did for a sizeable chunk of last season.

Beal, as a better shooter and more willing off-ball threat than Harden, also presents a much more seamless fit for Westbrook. In reuniting with Westbrook, head coach Scott Brooks could stagger his star backcourt’s minutes to ensure one of Russ or Beal is on the court at all times (though Brooks has often been criticized for failing to stagger stars).

The Wizards will likely remain a defensive disaster, but with plenty of shooting around Beal and Westbrook, an offense that played at the fifth-fastest pace last season – and one that was surprisingly potent before being besieged by injuries – should be enough to get Washington back in the Eastern Conference playoff mix.

The Wizards should join the revamped Hawks in a two-team tier below the East’s top seven, but from a talent perspective, both are closer to the Pacers than they are to a bottom-six group that’s likely to include the Magic, Bulls, Hornets, Pistons, Knicks, and Cavaliers. At the very least, Washington should qualify for the 2021 play-in tournament that will involve teams No. 7-10 – a sobering new reality for Westbrook, who’s used to playing for Western Conference teams with grander postseason ambitions.

After extending Beal last year, the Wizards have remained hellbent on keeping their other franchise cornerstone happy. Beal, in turn, has at least said the right things about wanting to remain in Washington for the life of his contract. Trading a future first-rounder and swapping one overpaid star for another in order to graduate from futility to mediocrity might seem like a shortsighted play, but the Wizards should be more competitive on a nightly basis, and if that keeps Beal happy and engaged, it’s a worthwhile gamble.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Sports

NHL players will likely have to pay for lost revenues, commissioner Bettman warns – CBC.ca

Published

 on


NHL commissioner Gary Bettman warned players Wednesday they are likely going to have to pay one way or another to make up for the league’s projected lost revenue whenever the 2020-21 season gets underway.

Speaking on a Sports Business Journal panel, Bettman stressed the NHL is not attempting to reopen the collective bargaining agreement some five months after it was extended. Instead, he said, the fiscal realities amid the pandemic mean the 50-50 revenue-sharing split between owners and players will be affected for at least the near future.

And that means players will have to bear the brunt of any shortfall to owners.

The question then becomes, Bettman said, whether it’s in their best interest to pay the money back in the short-term — by deferring a higher percentage of their salaries as the NHL has raised in discussions — or face the potential of having the salary cap stay flat over the remainder of the six-year deal.

“If we have to pay out lots of cash, two-thirds of which is going to come back to us, that may cause some stress,” Bettman said. “And by the same token, if the players owe us more money than anybody imagined, the salary cap could well be flat or close to flat for the next five or six years, and players into the future will be repaying what we’re owed.”

When it comes to a flat cap, which would have the potential of restricting future pay increases for players, Bettman said: “[Players] have to ask themselves, ‘Does this make sense?'”

The NHL’s new CBA currently calls for players to defer 10 per cent of their salary for the upcoming season and it puts a cap on how much money will be kept in escrow over the length of the deal.

Without calling it a formal proposal, the league has raised the possibility of having players increase salary deferrals to 20 per cent or 26 per cent and increasing the escrow caps, according to a person with knowledge of the discussions who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because neither side is publicly announcing details of negotiations.

The National Hockey League Players’ Association did not respond to a message seeking comment.

Players, agents unhappy with state of talks

Players and several agents have privately grumbled at the developments, and accused the league of attempting to renege on the deal reached in July that led to the resumption of play and the completion of last season.

Bettman refuted the criticism, calling it “unfortunate” and “inaccurate,” and said the agreement at the time was based on collective assumptions that are no longer applicable. The NHL now has to factor in a shortfall in gate revenue because fans aren’t expected to be allowed to attend games, at least initially.

Another issue is the likelihood of a one-time realignment due to cross-border travel restrictions, which will likely result in Canada’s seven teams competing in one division. U.S.-based teams might be required to play in hub cities, as opposed to their own arenas.

WATCH | I was in net for… The Easter Epic:

In episode 6 of our new series, Rob Pizzo speaks to former Washington Capitals goalie Bob Mason about the longest Game 7 in NHL history, and the Pat LaFontaine goal that finally ended it.  5:39

The league is also expected to play a shortened season, which could feature as few as 48 games, such as what happened in the lockout-shortened 2012-13 campaign.

In an email to The Associated Press, NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly said “as of right now,” the NHL is still targeting Jan. 1 to start the season, before adding: “That is obviously subject to change.”

It’s becoming increasingly unlikely the NHL will meet that target date. Players have not yet been asked to travel to their home cities. When they do, they will be potentially required to spend up to two weeks in self-quarantine before teams can even be allowed to open training camp.

Another issue are local health regulations. The NFL’s San Francisco 49ers, for example, relocated to Arizona this week after Santa Clara County banned contact sports teams from holding games and practices for at least the next three weeks.

The San Jose Sharks are based in the same county.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending