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Serena Williams, quartet of Canadians advance at U.S. Open – CBC Sports

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They came from far and wide for Serena — no last name required, befitting someone as much an icon as superstar athlete — to see her practice and play and, it turned out, win a match at the U.S. Open on Monday night, turning out in record numbers to fill Arthur Ashe Stadium and shout and applaud and pump their fists right along with her.

Serena Williams is not ready to say goodbye just yet. Nor, clearly, are her fans. And she heard them, loud and clear.

In her first match at what is expected to be the last U.S. Open — and last tournament — of her remarkable playing career, even if she insists that she won’t quite say so, Williams overcame a shaky start to overpower Danka Kovinic 6-3, 6-3 amid an atmosphere more akin to a festival than a farewell.

What memory will stick with her the most from the evening?

“When I walked out, the reception was really overwhelming. It was loud and I could feel it in my chest. It was a really good feeling,” said the owner of six U.S. Open championships and 23 Grand Slam titles overall, numbers unsurpassed by any other player in the sport’s professional era.

“It’s a feeling I’ll never forget,” she added. “Yeah, that meant a lot to me.”

WATCH | Serena Williams advances to 2nd round:

Serena Williams wins opening match at U.S. Open

4 hours ago

Duration 1:00

Facing what could have potentially been her last match, Serena Williams was victorious in round one at the U.S. Open defeating Danka Kovinic of Montenegro 6-3, 6-3.

This opening outing against Kovinic, a 27-year-old from Montenegro ranked 80th, became an event with a capital “E.” Spike Lee participated in the pre-match coin toss. Former President Bill Clinton was in the stands. So were Mike Tyson and Martina Navratilova, sitting next to each other. And sitting with Dad and Grandma was Williams’ daughter, Olympia, who turns 5 on Thursday, wearing white beads in her hair just like Mom did while winning the U.S. Open for the first time at age 17 back in 1999.

Williams is now 40, and told the world three weeks ago via an essay for Vogue that she was ready to concentrate on having a second child and her venture capital firm.

Asked after her victory Monday whether this will definitively be her final tournament, Williams replied with a knowing smile: “Yeah, I’ve been pretty vague about it, right?”

Then she added: “I’m going to stay vague, because you never know.”

The night session drew 29,000 folks, a high for the tournament — more than 23,000 were in Ashe; thousands more watched on a video screen outside the arena — and the place was as loud as ever. Certainly louder than any other first-round match in memory.

Both players called the decibel level “crazy.” Kovinic said she couldn’t hear the ball come off Williams’ racket strings — or even her own.

Early, Williams was not at her best. Maybe it was the significance of the moment. There were double-faults. Other missed strokes, missed opportunities. She went up 2-0, but then quickly trailed 3-2. Then, suddenly, Williams, looked a lot like the champion she’s been for decades and less like the player who came into this match with a 1-3 record since returning to action in late June after nearly a year off the tour.

“At this point, honestly, everything is a bonus for me, I feel,” Williams said. “It’s good that I was able to get this under my belt… I’m just not even thinking about that. I’m just thinking about just this moment. I think it’s good for me just to live in the moment now.”

She rolled through the end of that opening set, capping it with a service winner she reacted to with clenched fists and her trademark cry of “Come on!” That was met with thunderous cheers and applause — as was the ending of the 1-hour, 40-minute contest, as if another trophy had been earned.

Instead, there is plenty more work to be done. Williams will play in the second round of singles on Wednesday against No. 2 seed Anett Kontveit of Estonia. And there’s also doubles, too: Williams and her sister, Venus, are entered together in that competition, with their initial match slated for Wednesday or Thursday.

“Just keep supporting me,” Williams told the spectators, “as long as I’m here.”

2019 U.S. Open champ Andreescu downs Tan

Bianca Andreescu advanced to the second round of the U.S. Open with a 6-0, 3-6, 6-1 win over France’s Harmony Tan on Monday in New York.

As it turned out, Andreescu kick-started a successful opening day for Canadian singles players.

Andreescu, ranked 50th in the world heading into the final Grand Slam of the season, put the game away on her second match point when Tan missed on a forehand volley.

The 22-year-old from Mississauga, Ont., and 2019 U.S. champion, improved her all-time record to 11-1 at the tournament.

Bianca Andreescu of Mississauga, Ont., put away Harmony Tan in her first-round match at the U.S. Open on Monday when the French player missed on a forehand volley. She’ll next face Beatriz Haddad Maia of Brazil. (John Minchillo/Associated Press)

Andreescu started the match with a dominant first set, losing just eight points. She won 14 points in a row between the fourth and sixth games.

Tan came back with a strong second set, scoring two early breaks and jumping to a 4-0 lead. Andreescu cut the lead to 5-3, but Tan served to love in the decisive game to even the match at a set apiece.

WATCH | Andreescu wins 6 of 9 break points in 1st-round victory:

Bianca Andreescu displays flashes of dominance in advancing to U.S. Open 2nd round

10 hours ago

Duration 3:12

2019 U.S. Open champion Bianca Andreescu of Mississauga, Ont., defeated France’s Harmony Tan 6-0, 3-6, 6-1 in the first round at Flushing Meadows.

Andreescu returned to form in the third set, scoring an early break in Game 2 and taking a 3-0 lead. Tan won on serve to cut the lead to 3-1, but Andreescu responded by serving to love in Game 5, then came back from 40-0 down to score the break and take a 5-1 lead.

Serving for the match, Andreescu clinched the victory on her second match point.

Tan had 28 unforced errors and eight double-faults in the match, compared to 17 unforced errors and just one double-fault for Andreescu.

WATCH | Andreescu ousted from National Bank Open by Zheng:

Canada’s Bianca Andreescu eliminated from National Bank Open

18 days ago

Duration 2:58

Bianca Andreescu lost to China’s Zheng Qinwen 7-5, 5-7, 6-2 Thursday at the National Bank Open.

Andreescu won six of nine break points and defended one of the three she faced.

Andreescu will next face National Bank Open finalist Beatriz Haddad Maia of Brazil, who cruised to a 6-0, 6-0 win over Ana Konjuh of Croatia.

WATCH | Andreescu captures 2019 U.S. Open title:

Match Wrap: Andreescu makes history with U.S. Open victory over Williams

3 years ago

Duration 1:46

Bianca Andreescu becomes the first Canadian in history to win a Grand Slam singles title with her straight-set victory over Serena Williams.

Marino, Fernandez, Auger-Aliassime round out successful day for Canadians

Vancouver native Rebecca Marino will also be moving on to the second round, earning a 6-2, 6-3 win over Poland’s Magdalena Frech.

Marino, 31, won four of her seven break points to go along with 19 winners on the match.

WATCH | Marino victorious in 1st round:

Vancouver’s Rebecca Marino advances at U.S. Open

7 hours ago

Duration 1:53

Vancouver’s Rebecca Marino advanced to the second round of the U.S. Open with a 6-2, 6-3 win over Poland’s Magdalena Frech.

She will next face Daria Snigur, who upset seventh seed Simona Halep 6-2, 0-6, 6-4.

Leylah Fernandez of Laval, Que., who advanced to the 2021 U.S. Open final before losing to Britain’s Emma Raducanu, had her evening match delayed some 90 minutes, but managed to bounce Oceane Dodin of France 6-3, 6-4. The tournament’s 14th seed showed no signs of a foot injury that hampered her play in the National Bank Open.

“I had goose bumps stepping back into this court tonight,” said Fernandez post-match. “I felt the love here tonight. I was a bit tired waiting all day long, but the crowd’s cheers pushed me to the end. They [fans] also helped me calm my nerves and emotions.”

In men’s singles competition, sixth-seeded Felix Auger-Aliassime of Montreal struggled at times with his serve, but still managed to coast to a quick 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 win against Switzerland’s Alexander Ritschard.

Auger-Aliassime had 13 aces in the match, eight double faults and took four of eight break points.

WATCH | Auger-Aliassime through to 2nd round:

Felix Auger-Aliassime powers his way into the U.S. Open 2nd round

7 hours ago

Duration 2:58

Last year’s semifinalist Felix Auger-Aliassime of Montreal advanced to the second round of the U.S. Open with a 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 win over Switzerland’s Alexander Ritschard.

Top-seeded Medvedev cruises past Kozlov

Daniil Medvedev had an easy start to his U.S. Open title defence, beating Stefan Kozlov 6-2, 6-4, 6-0 on Monday.

Simona Halep had another early exit, this one coming in a memorable first tour-level win for Ukraine’s Snigur.

Snigur upset the No. 7 seed 6-2, 0-6, 6-4, then struggled through tears to explain what the victory meant to her family and her country, which is at war with Russia.

On the same Arthur Ashe Stadium court where Serena Williams began what could be the final tournament of her career with a 6-3, 6-3 victory over Danka Kovinic on Monday night, the top-seeded Medvedev looked just as strong as he did in sweeping past Novak Djokovic in last year’s final for his first major title.

Medvedev advanced to face Arthur Rinderknech of France. The Russian is trying to become the first repeat champion at the U.S. Open since Roger Federer won five straight from 2004-08.

“I need to be at my best on Wednesday and I’m going to try to make it,” Medvedev said.

Andy Murray into 2nd round with early upset

Andy Murray was another early winner, 10 years after winning the first of his three Grand Slam titles in Flushing Meadows. He had one of the first upsets of the tournament by beating No. 24 seed Francisco Cerundolo of Argentina 7-5, 6-3, 6-3.

“It seems like a long time ago,” Murray said of his victory over Djokovic in 2012. “A lot’s happened since then in my career.”

Djokovic couldn’t travel to the tournament this year because he isn’t vaccinated against COVID-19.

Fourth-seeded Stefanos Tsitsipas won’t be staying in it after dropping the first 11 games to qualifier Daniel Elahi Galan before falling 6-0, 6-1, 3-6, 7-5.

Many fans arriving for the day session at the final Grand Slam event of the season were focused on the match that would lead off the action at night. Williams, the 23-time major champion, has said she is preparing to end her tennis career.

Coco Gauff wasn’t going to miss it, saying she was going to change plans and attend instead of watching on TV in her hotel room.

“As I thought about it, I was, like, I have to watch,” the 18-year-old American said after her straight-sets victory. “I’m excited and, you know, it’s not often we watch live matches, to be honest.”

This year’s Wimbledon runner-up, Nick Kyrgios, was the winner in the night match, with the Australian saying he watched Williams’ ceremony on TV before following her onto the court.

They faced more comfortable conditions after a hot start under a sunny sky in Flushing Meadows. Leading 3-0 in the third set, Medvedev told the chair umpire he wanted a bag of ice so he could put it on his head.

“It was pretty hot today and humid,” Medvedev said. “I see the other guys coming from five-setters in the locker room, pretty red faces. That’s also fun in a way sometimes to get through these conditions. Even today, the match was maybe not that intensive and long, but, yeah, I sweated a lot and it was not easy.”

Taylor Fritz, the No. 10 seed, said he he struggled with the windy conditions in his four-set loss to qualifier Brandon Holt, the son of two-time U.S. Open women’s champion Tracy Austin.

Ukrainian shocks No. 7 Halep for 1st win

Snigur was playing her first match in the main draw of a Grand Slam. The 20-year-old wore a ribbon in the blue and yellow colours of Ukraine’s flag on her chest, and she put her hands around it after finishing off the victory.

She played last week in the “Tennis Plays for Peace Exhibition” to raise money to aid Ukraine. That was on Louis Armstrong Stadium, which may have calmed her nerves a bit when she was sent back out onto the same court Monday.

“I think it helped me because I was here in `Tennis Plays for Peace’ and I think it helped me a little bit,” Snigur said as she fought through tears during an on-court interview.

Halep had won 19 of her last 22 matches and recently returned to the top 10, but the U.S. Open has been the most challenging major for the two-time Grand Slam champion. She is 21-11 in New York and has lost in the first round of three of her last five appearances.

Daria Snigur of Ukraine reacts after defeating No. 7 seed Simona Halep, who had won 19 of her last 22 matches and recently returned to the top 10. (Julian Finney/Getty Images)

Two other past champions had short stays. Dominic Thiem, the 2020 champion who missed last year because of injury, fell to Pablo Carreno Busta in four sets. The 2016 winner, Stan Wawrinka, retired from his match against Corentin Moutet after losing a second-set tiebreaker. He has been plagued by injuries in recent years.

No. 29 seed Tommy Paul overcame the heat to outlast Bernabe Zapata Miralles 4-6, 6-3, 2-6, 6-0, 7-5 in 3 hours, 10 minutes. Fellow American Sebastian Korda also got his first win at his home Slam, beating Facundo Bagnis in four sets.

Another American advanced in an upset, with J.J. Wolf ousting No. 16 seed Roberto Bautista Agut in straight sets.

Victorious Wu makes Chinese history

Also, Wu Yibing became the first Chinese man to win a U.S. Open match in the professional era, upsetting No. 31 seed Nikoloz Basilashvili 6-3, 6-4, 6-0. He had played his way into the field through the qualifying tournament, joining countryman and fellow qualifier Zhang Zhizhen as the first Chinese men in the U.S. Open main draw since the open era began in 1968.

Zhang lost his first-round match.

Third-seeded Maria Sakkari and No. 17 Caroline Garcia were among the early winners on the women’s side, with Sakkari overcoming Wimbledon semifinalist Tatjana Maria in three sets.

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Mariners-Blue Jays 2022 Wild Card Series Game 1 FAQ – MLB.com

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TORONTO — After regular-season campaigns with very few dull moments, two postseason-hungry clubs are ready for October.

The Blue Jays and Mariners face off in Game 1 of the American League Wild Card Series on Friday at Rogers Centre.

Seattle snapped the largest active playoff drought in MLB by securing the second AL Wild Card spot with a 90-72 regular-season record, while Toronto will play a postseason game in front of its fans for the first time since 2016.

Since the Blue Jays secured home-field advantage by finishing the regular season with the best record among AL Wild Card teams, at 92-70, all of the games in the best-of-three set will be played at Rogers Centre. The winner gets a date with the Astros in the American League Division Series.

For both teams, this moment is a balancing act between excitement and the demands of the spotlight.

“Pressure is something you put in your tires,” said righty Alek Manoah, who will start Game 1 for the Blue Jays against the Mariners’ Luis Castillo. “This is just baseball. This is just a game. Understand [that,] go out there and have some fun and leave the pressure for your tires.”

“It’s the postseason, where confidence can play an important role here,” Castillo said through interpreter Freddy Llanos. “And when I go up on that mound, I’m very confident.”

When is the game and how can I watch it?

Game 1: Friday, 4 p.m. ET/1 p.m. PT, ESPN (Sportsnet in Canada)
Game 2: Saturday, 4 p.m. ET/1 p.m. PT, ESPN (Sportsnet in Canada)
Game 3 (if necessary): Sunday, 2 p.m. ET/11 a.m. PT, ABC (Sportsnet in Canada)

All series are available in the US on MLB.TV with authentication to a participating Pay TV provider. Games are not available live internationally (archives are available approximately 90 minutes after the game ends).

What might the starting lineups look like?

Mariners: Manager Scott Servais hinted on Thursday that the lineup will likely look similar to what he’s rolled out in recent weeks, with Julio Rodríguez and Ty France at the top, followed by Mitch Haniger, Eugenio Suárez and Carlos Santana in some order. Servais likes to go right-left when possible, especially against a power pitcher like Manoah.

Blue Jays: Toronto’s biggest decision comes at the DH spot, but with Alejandro Kirk catching Manoah in Game 1, Danny Jansen has been swinging the bat too well to keep him out of the lineup. This is close to the order that the Blue Jays were using down the stretch against the Yankees and Red Sox as they tried to clinch a postseason spot, then home field.

Who are the starting pitchers?

Mariners: Castillo (8-6, 2.99 ERA) takes the mound bringing supreme confidence after a stellar 11-start stretch after the Mariners acquired him ahead of the Trade Deadline. Though his postseason experience is limited to 2020, when there were no fans in the stands, Castillo has already established himself as a big-game pitcher and welcomes this stage.

Blue Jays: Manoah (16-7, 2.24 ERA) opens the series, and the Blue Jays couldn’t be happier. The big right-hander is built for the postseason and seems to feed off the moment and crowd as well as anyone in baseball. September’s AL Pitcher of the Month is peaking at the right time, and he should benefit from some extra rest just like he did in his last outing.

Mariners: Sam Haggerty (Grade 2 right adductor strain) won’t be on the postseason roster after suffering the injury on Monday, dealing the Mariners a big blow for their sparkplug off the bench. Jesse Winker (cervical disc bulge) also hit the 10-day IL this week, though his role was more unclear given his significant defensive struggles and brutal second half at the plate. Instead, the Mariners will lean on Taylor Trammell and Abraham Toro, the players who were recalled from Triple-A Tacoma to take those guys’ places.

Blue Jays: Lourdes Gurriel Jr. (left hamstring strain) and Santiago Espinal (left oblique strain) both flew home from Baltimore early this week to continue their rehabs in the controlled atmosphere at Rogers Centre, and each decision is expected to come right down to the wire. It’s also a question of just how ready either would be after Gurriel said Monday that he may only be ready to pinch-hit by the postseason opener. Would that be enough, especially considering the talent already in this lineup?

The only issue on the pitching side is expected to be a minor one and no longer an issue by Game 2, but Kevin Gausman left his final regular-season outing with a cut on his right middle finger, near the nail. Both Gausman and manager John Schneider said this shouldn’t impact his expected Game 2 start, but it’s worth keeping an eye on over the next 24 hours.

Who is hot and who is not?

Mariners: Rodríguez rocketed his 28th homer in the regular-season finale, putting the finishing touches on an AL Rookie of the Year Award bid, and given how much he already relishes the big stage, it’s a strong bet that he’ll impact this series. As for who’s not, Crawford’s inconsistencies have stretched all the way into a two-month period, with the shortstop slashing .200/.340/.259 (.599 OPS) over the final two months.

Blue Jays: Several Blue Jays are peaking at the right time, which started with Bichette in September. Bichette hit .403 with a 1.134 OPS that month, his 48 hits the most in a single month by a Blue Jays hitter. Merrifield has caught fire since taking over everyday reps from Espinal, too, flashing some power down the stretch and completely flipping the script on his ‘22 season with the Blue Jays. Jansen, who started the year hot then hit the IL with a fractured bone in his hand, is back in a groove, too, and could be an X-factor in this series at the bottom of the lineup.

If there’s one hitter the Blue Jays need more from, though, it’s Guerrero. He’s had his moments, like his walk-off hit to beat the Yankees in 10 innings on Sept. 26, but he simply hasn’t been the hitter everyone saw in ‘21, when he looked like a perennial MVP candidate and Triple Crown threat. Guerrero’s potential impact is unrivaled, though, and the Blue Jays need him to break a game open.

Anything else I should know?

Mariners: Seattle hasn’t been on this stage in a generation, and there are only a handful of players on the roster who have any postseason experience. Because of how green they are, they could be susceptible to a sink-or-swim effect, but they’ve also shown late-inning resiliency to punch back when the stakes are high.

Blue Jays: The Blue Jays are ready to be aggressive, a mindset they’ve been preaching since Schneider took the reins in July. That starts on the bases, where the Blue Jays have done a much better job of taking extra bags, but it could extend to bullpen usage, too. Jordan Romano, the Canadian closer coming off a season with a 2.11 ERA and 36 saves, has made nine multi-inning (1 1/3 or more frames) appearances this season. They certainly won’t shy away from another.

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Stutzle's three-point night propels Senators over Canadiens in Gander, N.L. – Sportsnet.ca

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Tim Stutzle recorded a goal and two assists as the Ottawa Senators won their third consecutive game over the Montreal Canadiens 4-3 Thursday in pre-season action at the Steele Community Centre in Gander, N.L.

Drake Batherson opened the scoring just 38 seconds into the game, followed by a Brady Tkachuk goal under eight minutes later as Ottawa (4-3) took an early 2-0 lead.

Kaiden Guhle put Montreal (0-6-1) on the board 12:23 into the first period to cut the deficit.

In the second, Kirby Dach scored a power-play goal to even the game for the Canadiens 5:13 into the period. However, Stutzle responded six minutes later to put Ottawa up once again.

Claude Giroux added to the Senators’ lead 8:02 into the final period. Josh Anderson scored for Montreal a minute later but that was all the Canadiens could muster.

Anton Forsberg stopped 20-of-23 shots he faced in the victory while his counterpart Cayden Primeau made 22 saves for Montreal.

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Online gambling in Canada: The risks and how to stay safe

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Gambling is a popular pastime in Canada, with many people regularly taking part in activities such as the lottery, casinos, and online gambling.

While gambling can be a fun and enjoyable way to spend time, it’s important to be aware of the risks involved.

How to online gamble safely in Canada – A guide for beginners

There are a few things to keep in mind when gambling online in Canada, especially if you’re a beginner.

First and foremost, you should only gamble with money that you can afford to lose. It’s also important to set limits for yourself – both on how much you’re willing to spend and how much time you’re willing to spend gambling.

It’s also a good idea to do some research before you start gambling. This means reading up on the different types of games available on N°1 guide to online gambling in Canada, as well as the odds of winning. Once you have a good understanding of the basics, you can then start looking for an online casino that offers the games and odds that you’re interested in.

What are the risks of online gambling in Canada?

There are a few risks associated with online gambling in Canada, but they are relatively minor. The biggest risk is probably financial, as it can be easy to get carried away and spend more money than you intended to.

Another risk is that of addiction, as gambling can be quite addictive. If you find yourself spending more and more time gambling, or if you start neglecting other aspects of your life in favor of gambling, it might be time to seek help.

Finally, there is the risk of getting scammed. There are a lot of scams out there, and some of them target people who gamble online. Be sure to do your research and only gamble with reputable sites to minimize this risk.

What types of online gambling are available in Canada?

The most popular type is online casino gambling, which includes games such as slots, blackjack, roulette, and poker. There are also many sports betting websites available in Canada, where you can bet on your favourite teams and players. Finally, there are also online lottery websites where you can purchase tickets for various lottery games.

So if you’re thinking about gambling online, remember to do your research, choose a reputable site, and most importantly, don’t bet more than you can afford to lose.

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