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Sex workers say Canada's laws put them in danger — and demand the new government fix them – Global News

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She starts by screening them.

Whenever Mari receives online booking requests from new clients, the dominatrix and sex worker asks them to email her their government identification or a piece of work ID.

She also accepts references clients may have from other sex workers. If a client is known to others as a bad date, she won’t see them.

But Mari, who asked Global News to identify her by first name only, says not all sex workers have the “privilege” of screening clients in this way.

Those who work on the street may not have the ability to screen at all, or have to negotiate services in unsafe environments since aspects of communicating about sex work are criminalized.

“It makes our work less safe,” Mari says.

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Sex workers and legal experts argue that Canada’s sex work laws are prohibitive and doing the opposite of what they’re supposed to do — instead of protecting “human dignity,” the laws push sex workers into dangerous situations by criminalizing nearly every aspect of their job.

Built into Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act (PCEPA), is a commitment to review the laws by the end of 2019. That time is now, and advocates say nothing has happened.

The Canadian Alliance of Sex Work Law Reform is calling on the Liberals to start that review process and act on decriminalization. The group also wants to see provincial and territorial employment laws regulate the sex industry as a form of labour.

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The organization, which is made up of sex workers’ rights groups from across the country, also says sex workers need to be part of legal reform. They are the ones who know how to best protect their rights, the alliance argues.

READ MORE: Sex worker advocacy group says police violated their privacy

“Despite the stated commitment in 2015 to replace the PCEPA and to reform prostitution laws, the Liberal Party of Canada has yet to take meaningful steps,” the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network recently wrote to the government.

In a statement to Global News, a spokesperson for the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada said it is a governmental priority to ensure that “our laws are effective in meeting their objectives, promoting public safety and security, and are consistent with our constitutionally protected rights.”

“With regard to the five-year review, the Act provides that it is Parliament’s responsibility to establish or designate a committee to study the matter,” the spokesperson said.

“As Parliament has just opened, the House is currently in the process of forming Committees. In the interim, we continue to engage with those involved.”

Sex work laws in Canada

Bill C-36 criminalizes the purchasing of sex but decriminalizes its sale. Known as an “end-demand” model, it also forbids negotiating sexual services in certain public places, such as near schools, financially benefitting off the sale of someone’s sexual services or knowingly advertising sexual services.

Bill C-36 came into effect in 2014 under a Conservative government after the Supreme Court struck down Canada’s previous laws in 2013 for being unconstitutional.

The court found the old laws imposed “dangerous conditions on prostitution” and prevented people engaged in a “risky, but legal, activity from taking steps to protect themselves.”

The Conservatives’ solution was PCEPA, which “treats prostitution as a form of sexual exploitation that disproportionately impacts on women and girls.”

In 2014, then-Liberal MP Justin Trudeau voted against Bill C-36, and the Liberals promised to reform sex work laws throughout the 2015 campaign. Despite this, the Liberal government made no changes to the law during Trudeau’s first mandate.

At the 2018 Liberal Party convention, the Young Liberals of Canada called for the decriminalization of consensual sex work. The organization argued the “current prohibition of buying consensual sex work does not address the underlying issues that make sex work dangerous, but rather creates a climate that makes sex workers unlikely to work with the police and be involved with more serious crimes.”

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But sex work wasn’t a much-debated topic during the recent 2019 federal election campaign, despite efforts from more than 150 human rights groups that called on the winning party to decriminalize sex work. Sex work law reform was also not a part of the Liberals’ 2019 campaign platform.

Alice, a sex worker who asked Global News to change her name to protect her identity, says Maggie’s, the Toronto-based sex workers’ rights organization, even tried to host a panel with local MPs to raise its concerns.

The event was cancelled by Maggie’s due to poor response from politicians.

The laws essentially criminalize “almost every facet of sex work,” says Sandra Ka Hon Chu, director of research and advocacy at the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network.

“They make it incredibly difficult for sex workers to organize, to work in safety, to work together, to work with third parties who could promote their safety, and to even communicate with clients,” Chu says.

Some research shows how Canada’s end-demand model is harmful.

READ MORE: Demands grow for Canada to decriminalize sex work after the election

Research presented at the 2018 International AIDS Conference found that going after the men who buy sex does not actually help sex workers. Instead, researchers said it makes it harder for sex workers to negotiate terms of service, including condom use.

“The criminalization of sex work makes the environment of sex workers’ labour criminal by criminalizing relationships with clients and third parties and sex work income and workplaces,” another recent report by Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network found.

“While the PCEPA immunizes some sex workers from criminal prosecution, sex workers continue to experience ongoing human rights abuses perpetuated by both the presence and practice of law enforcement in the course of their work.”

New Zealand decriminalized sex work in 2003, which has lead to improved conditions for sex workers, including safer working environments and better relationships between workers and police, a 2008 study found.

Another 2009 study found New Zealand’s laws also did not lead to an increase in sex workers, as numbers in the industry stayed around the same.

This is not surprising to Mari, who says Canada’s end-demand model ignores the fact there’s always going to be people who purchase sex.

“And that’s why the model is a very bad model to be following; it restricts our movements and our rights.”

Advertising and communicating about sex work is incredibly hard

For sex workers who find clients online, laws around advertising make it very difficult to explicitly outline services. Bill C-36 criminalizes advertising the sale of sexual services, including through print media, on websites or in “locations that offer sexual services for sale,” like strip clubs.

While sex workers are protected from criminal liability for advertising their own sexual services, website administrators can be charged for hosting such ads, which means sites are less likely to host sex workers’ websites. Content in violation of Canada’s laws can be taken down at any time and seized by the authorities.

This results in sex workers having to use more vague and coded terms so their content is not reported.

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“Advertising is very important for business and for openly communicating terms of service and determining consent,” says Anne Margaret Deck, vice-chair of the board at Maggie’s.

While prohibitive for all sex workers, those who work on the street may experience even further challenges.

Canada’s laws also make it illegal to communicate “for the purposes of offering or providing sexual services for consideration” near school grounds, playgrounds or daycare centres.

Kerry Porth, a former sex worker and sex work policy consultant at the Vancouver-based Pivot Legal Society, says even though communication laws are directed at clients, they harm sex workers, too.

“Even if you only criminalize one party, that communication becomes criminalized and very difficult,” she says.

What’s more, the fact that a third-party cannot advertise on behalf of a sex worker is also harmful, she says. Porth highlights that some sex workers lack resources or the ability to work independently and prefer to work for an escort agency, for example.

READ MORE: SafeSpace London fears naming johns could increase danger for sex workers

Chu, the lawyer, says that for migrant sex workers, for whom language barriers may be a factor, the laws are especially damaging.

“The most marginalized people who do sex work, they’re probably under the most scrutiny because they don’t have access to some of the things that less marginalized people do,” she says.

Screening clients can be hard

Because it’s illegal to purchase sex, Mari says clients have a lot of fear around divulging their identity.

This makes it difficult for sex workers to screen clients in a comprehensive way, which ultimately jeopardizes their safety.

“If [clients] do not want to divulge their identity, their places of work and their reasons for coming to see us, it creates danger for the worker because you do not have any information about your client,” Mari says.

“In any other workplace or any other business, you have information about your clients.”

Those who work in rural communities may have greater difficulty getting clients to offer their personal information ahead of a meeting, especially in places where sex work is heavily policed.

Porth echoes this and says sex workers who work online — who are generally independent indoor workers — are also concerned they might be communicating with a police officer masked as a client.

WATCH BELOW: Canada’s failure to end violence against women







“There’s been a number of sting operations online and so those concerns are valid,” she says.

Violence and sexual harassment are also a legitimate concern.

According to Statistics Canada, there were 294 homicides of sex workers between 1991 and 2014. A third of those murders were unsolved as of 2016, more than 10 per cent higher than the unsolved rate for murders that do not involve sex workers.

Sex workers who are transgender, Indigenous or people of colour are even more vulnerable to violence.

Predators are aware that police are less inclined to investigate the disappearances of sex workers, the Canadian Alliance of Sex Work Law Reform says, and they also know Indigenous and migrant women often fear police detection and apprehension.

READ MORE: ‘It’s time to stop the moral panic’ — Sex worker sounds off on body politics

“Street-based sex workers or sex workers that don’t have an established business and are working independently might have to compromise their safety in order to simply get business and pay their rent,” Deck says.

“And predatory clients know this; they know what they can get away with.”

Efforts to squash stigma

Outside of legal barriers, the stigma around sex work is one of the biggest issues sex workers face. Industry experts argue the laws paint all sex workers as “victims” that need to be “saved” from sex work.

Human trafficking is also often conflated with sex work, even though they are two different things, Porth explains.

While there are instances in which women are trafficked into sex work, that is not the reality for many sex workers who simply want to be able to work safely and on their own terms.

READ MORE: Regina aims to restrict body rub parlours to industrial areas only

Alice says the stigma affects many aspects of her life, including the ability to secure housing and travel. Landlords don’t like renting to sex workers, and health-care providers may pass judgment, too.

Sex workers deserve the right to work in safe conditions just like any other Canadian worker, Deck says.

“Having these laws in the Criminal Code at all just continues to criminalize the industry, push it underground, further isolate sex workers and contribute to stigma.”

— With a file from Rachel Browne

Laura.Hensley@globalnews.ca

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The 4 Keys to Paying Less On Your Car Insurance

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car insurance

If one of your friends or family members got a better car insurance premium than you, it isn’t because they know someone in the industry, or they got lucky; all they did was follow these four simple steps to lower auto insurance premiums:

When it comes to car insurance in Canada, many of us pay too much. If you happen to know someone who has the same driving record as you do, yet they are paying less, it isn’t an accident, and no insurance company. What they more than likely did was used these four ways to get the lower rate:

 

1. RATE COMPARISON

Ummm, let me say state this differently, the SHOPPED! We shop prices for cars, computers, clothes, and these days EVEN gas, but when it comes to car insurance, we get the quote from the insurance rep and say “ok” and pay the rate without even shopping it!

There is a couple of reasons why we do this, and incidentally, they are myths … here is why we don’t shop

Myth #1 – there is no reason to shop because there is no difference between insurance companies when it comes to the coverage. They all charge the same price

Myth #2 – shopping rates are for new drivers who don’t have insurance yet or those people who have had accidents or tickets.

Those myths need to be BLOW OUT OF THE WATER! If you believe them, it costs you money!

If your driving record is clean, you are probably still paying way too much for car insurance because car insurance companies DON’T all charge the same; their rates do vary, and in some cases, they differ a lot.

Take the time to get a Canada car insurance quote [http://www.insurmycar.ca/quoteme.html].

 

 

 

 

2. Deductibles, consider raising them…

A deductible is the amount of the claim that YOU pay, and then your insurance company pays the rest if you are involved in an accident. We usually take the lower deductible because we want to pay less out of our pocket and have the insurance company kick in more. Good in theory, but, of course, it doesn’t work that way. We are still paying a higher premium. If you go with a higher deductible, it lowers your premium; I mean, we aren’t in accidents every day, right? So, why not elect to pay the higher deductible to save over the long run on our rate?

 

 

3. Discount, hey, do you offer any…

There are many insurance discounts you can take advantage of; here are ones to ask for:

Age – when you hit 25, the rate drops. There could be other breaks as well… ask!

Multi-vehicle discount – more than one car insured with the same company

Multi-line discount – insure the car, house, cottage, and boat and get a break if it is with the same company.

Anti-theft discount – get discounts based on the anti-theft devices you have

Low mileage discount – you’re a lower risk if you don’t drive that much.

Occupational discount – depending on the line of work you’re in, you may be one.

Auto club discount: CAA or some of the other auto clubs have discounts.

The key here … If you don’t ask, you don’t get it!

 

 

4. Watch your driving…

I know, I know, things happen when you’re on the road. However, keep in mind that your driving record is the key factor insurance company’s use in figuring out your insurance rates. The accidents you happen to get involved in that are your fault, and the traffic tickets all factor in and remain with you for a long time, so pay attention to what you’re doing!

We ALL have to pay for car insurance in Canada; that’s the law. However, we DON’T have to pay huge car insurance premiums; take the time, and use the four keys above; you can save on car insurance in Canada!

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Hong Kong considers two-week quarantine for flight crew: SCMP

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(Reuters) – Hong Kong is considering ordering flight crew entering the Asian financial hub to quarantine for two weeks, the South China Morning Post reported on Thursday, citing sources.

All pilots and cabin crew, including local staff, will have to quarantine in a hotel if they stay in Hong Kong for more than two hours, three sources told the newspaper.

Hong Kong’s flag carrier Cathay Pacific Airways and the government did not immediately respond to Reuters requests for comment on the potential mandate.

Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam said earlier this week that social distancing measures set to expire this week would be extended to contain infections.

 

(Reporting by Nikhil Kurian Nainan in Bengaluru; Editing by Arun Koyyur)

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Newfoundland government to fund refinery as search for buyer continues

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By Laura Sanicola and Nia Williams

(Reuters) – Province Newfoundland and Labrador will give North Atlantic Refinery Limited C$16.6 million ($13.05 million) to keep its 135,000 barrels per day Come-by-Chance plant idled as the owner seeks a new capital partner, the provincial government said on Friday.

The funding agreement will cover 75% of eligible labor costs of refinery employees and 50% of eligible non-labor costs in Newfoundland and Labrador to keep the refinery warm in case of a future restart, according to a release from the government.

“Part of this agreement includes a commitment by NARL LP and its owners that it will continue its ongoing buyer/investor search for the refinery,” said Andrew Parsons, minister of industry, energy and technology.

The plant has been idle since early April, with about 100 workers operating the plant, down from the 400 full-time employees the refinery employed prior to the shutdown.

It supplied major U.S. East Coast harbors including New York and Boston, but was the first North American refinery to idle as fuel demand collapsed during the coronavirus pandemic.

Approximately 200 workers will be employed at the facility as a result of the new funding agreement.

“Currently, maintenance of the refinery requires North Atlantic to incur significant monthly financial losses. This funding will offset labour and operational costs related to maintaining the refinery in idle mode,” North Atlantic Refinery said in a statement.

Come-by-Chance has been looking for a new owner after Irving Oil backed away from a purchase and share agreement in October shortly before it was set to close on acquiring the company.

The company also received interest from U.S.-based energy company Origin International in restarting fuel processing there in “a more environmentally sustainable model.”

Parsons told Reuters in a phone interview that conversations with entities interested in buying Come-by-Chance were continuing this year. He also said the provincial government had discussed buying the plant itself, but had concerns about its lack of expertise in refining.

In December Newfoundland and Labrador announced it would give C$41.5 million to the idled West White Rose offshore oil project, now owned by Cenovus Energy. That money came from the federal government’s C$320 million Oil and Gas Recovery Fund, launched last year to support Canada’s struggling offshore oil industry. The funding for Come-by-Chance came from a contingency fund in the provincial government’s budget, Parsons said.

 

($1 = 1.2724 Canadian dollars)

 

(Reporting by Laura Sanicola and Nia Williams; Editing by Steve Orlofsky)

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