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Simcoe-Muskoka's COVID count reduced by one case – BarrieToday

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The cumulative COVID-19 case count for the Simcoe-Muskoka region has gone down by one today. 

The Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit reported there was a duplicate entry of a Bradford case and so one has been removed.

Simcoe County reported there have been no further positive test results in staff or residents at Simcoe Manor in Beeton. An outbreak was declared at the county-operated facility on June 22 after one resident tested positive. The county reported the man is still in hospital, but his health is improving. 

The health unit still lists Simcoe Manor and Stayner Care Centre in outbreak. The Stayner facility has been in outbreak since June 18 with one staff member reported positive for COVID-19.

The Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit has confirmed 599 cases of the coronavirus in the region to-date, and reported 503 of those cases as recovered. There have been 36 deaths linked to COVID in the region since March.

There are 60 active cases of COVID-19 in the region (56 in Simcoe County), including four people who have been hospitalized with the virus.

The average incidence rate for the province of Ontario is 235.9 cases per 100,000 people, and the rate for Simcoe County is 107.5 cases per 100,000 people. 

Case breakdown by municipality for Simcoe County as of June 29

Municipality Total cases  Recoveries  Deaths  In Hospital  Last case reported  Incidence rate* 
Barrie18315514 June 29122.6
Bradford W-G12310512 June 26286.3
New Tecumseth765512June 29183.4
Innisfil4940 1June 29120.3
Orillia18162 June 2353.8
Collingwood1515  May 1962.5
Wasaga Beach15131 June 1965.2
Clearview861 June 15not released
Springwater13121 June 2261.9
Midland76  June 29not released
Oro-Medonte642 June 1not released
Adjala-Tosorontio99  June 1677.2
Essa15141 June 1962.7
Ramara108  June 2396.3
Tiny44  June 22not released
Tay65  June 29not released
Penetanguishene66  June 12not released
Severn**54  June 23not released
Georgian Bay54 1June 22not released

*Incidence rate is the number of cases per 100,000 of the population for that municipality

**Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit previously reported 10 cases in Severn, but has since reassigned five of the cases to Georgian Bay Township based on their addresses

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Health unit temporarily shuts down Leamington farm operation over COVID-19 cases – Windsor Star

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Article content continued

Some workers also want to apply for an open work permit, he said, “because they don’t want to work under these conditions.” He said they cited living in bunkhouses with at least 20 other workers.

“A couple of workers told me they’ve been taking care of themselves, using masks, washing their hands, but if you share housing with 20 others it’s very tough to keep yourself safe.”

It’s too early to determine the impact of the shutdown on the farm, said Taylor.

“It will depend on what the plan is … how the workforce is isolated, what potential there is for any of the workforce to return to work,” she said. “But obviously when you’re dealing with a living crop, there’s always the possibility that the crop might perish if they’re not able to source replacement labour.”

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Nine Additional Cases of COVID-19 in Windsor-Essex – AM800 (iHeartRadio)

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Another drop in confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Windsor-Essex.

The local health unit is reporting an additional nine cases as of Wednesday morning at 10:30am.

In a release, the health unit says, seven of those nine cases are from the agri-farm sector while one case is a health care worker.

There are now a total of 1,611 confirmed cases, 68 deaths and 893 cases resolved in Windsor-Essex. 

There are two outbreaks at long-term care homes and four workplaces have two or more cases.

Medical Officer of Health Dr. Wajid Ahmed will hold his daily briefing at 9:30 Thursday morning.
 

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Nova Scotia’s presumed consent law for organ donation to go into effect on Jan. 18 – Globalnews.ca

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Nova Scotia announced Tuesday that its new Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act will come into effect on Jan. 18, 2021.

The goal is to allow more residents to donate their organs at their time of death through presumed or “deemed consent.”

Starting in January, unless a person explicitly denies donating, and the decision is recorded on their health card, they will be seen as agreeing to be a donor after death.

The province first passed the law in April 2019.

The announcement that the law will come into effect in January, means Nova Scotia will be the first jurisdiction in North America to have a presumed consent law.

READ MORE: Should Canada have presumed consent for organ donations? Here are the pros and cons

“Providing the opportunity for donation at end-of-life is an important part of optimal end-of-life care,” says Dr. Stephen Beed, the Medical Director of the Nova Scotia Organ and Tissue Donation Program.

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Beed told Global News that he believes this will make Nova Scotia a leader.

“I hope we have a system that provides some good in the middle of what’s otherwise nothing but bad news,” he said.

Beed said the new law will allow “better care for potential donor families and better care for people who are presently awaiting a transplant.”






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Nova Scotia legislature passes presumed consent law for organ donation


Nova Scotia legislature passes presumed consent law for organ donation

A news release says as of Monday, there are 108 Nova Scotians waiting for an organ transplant.

Last year, only 53 residents received an organ donation.

The province said in a news release, “a single organ donor can save up to eight lives, and a single tissue donor can help up to 75 people.”

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Read more:
Protecting transplant patients from COVID-19 leads to delays in life-changing surgeries 

Organs that can be donated include kidneys, heart, lungs, liver, pancreas and small bowel, according to the release. Donor tissues include corneas, sclera, skin, heart valves, bone, cartilage, tendons and ligaments.

There are several exclusions to the new law.

People who are under 19 years old, those without decision-making capacity and those who have lived in the province for less than a year, are exempt from deemed consent.






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N.S. to become 1st in North America to adopt presumed consent for organ donations


N.S. to become 1st in North America to adopt presumed consent for organ donations

Beed says Nova Scotians are largely supportive of organ donation according to NSHA’s surveys.

The new system, he says, is designed to encourage donation but also support those who choose to not be a donor.

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Those who know they want to donate will still be able to indicate so through their health cards.

Read more:
Timberlea man is Nova Scotia’s first convalescent plasma donor

The province will launch an awareness campaign in early July to inform residents of the upcoming changes to the Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act.

“This change will help more people get the good news they have been waiting for and ensure more potential donors have the chance to save and improve lives,” said Premier Stephen McNeil in the release.

Beed says he is proud of the new system and that Nova Scotia has a unique opportunity to be the first to do this as the rest of the country takes note.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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