Connect with us

Media

Singer from Montreal’s south shore becomes social media sensation – Global News

Published

 on


When COVID-19 struck in March, all of singer songwriter Damien Robitaille’s musical gigs got cancelled. He had been touring in Europe, but quickly cut short his work trip to return to his home in Longueuil.

With his children living in Europe, Robitaille found himself alone and with a lot of time on his hands.

“I had two options: either I could just sit at home be depressed or just do what I know what to do…sing, sing, sing,” he said.

So, to pass the time, Robitaille started posting videos of cover songs on social media. For the first 100 days of lockdown, he posted a new video each day. He taught himself the songs in one day, using his piano, drums and a shaker to make his music.

The quirky, but charming videos typically get a few thousand views on various social media platforms. His song choices ranged from everything from classics like Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody to Jump by Van Halen.

Story continues below advertisement

But this week, 39-year-old Robitaille posted a video that struck a chord with social media influencers.

He made a cover video of the popular 90s song, Pump up the Jam by Technotronic. His dog, Suki made an appearance in his video.

“The one perfect take was when my dog decided to pop into the scene and photo bombed,” he said. “I tried to keep a straight face and keep singing to the end. Then I was like, ‘Do I keep this? The dog ruins the video’, but then I think she helped to bring it to the next level.”

Read more:
Finding fun during the COVID-19 crisis, Montreal family holds nightly themed dinners

Former basketball player Rex Chapman, with one million Twitter followers, retweeted the video. So did actor Elijah Wood, and this week, Quebec Premier François Legault gave him a thumbs up. Robitaille estimates that the video was seen on all his social media platforms about 10 million times.

“I am so touched by the outpouring of love,” he said.  “I’m also like finally finally it broke through. It took 137 songs for the dam to open up, and now the waters are flowing.”

The Franco-Ontarian Robitaille mainly sings in French, releasing a Christmas album last year.

Story continues below advertisement

But sitting home alone during the pandemic, with his children living in Europe, he got inspired.

He sometimes spends up to 12 hours a day learning the songs and recording his videos, all on his own. He often dresses up in costumes, because he says he’s putting on a show for his audience.

The songs don’t bring him any money. Robitaille says he simply gets joy from all the positive feedback he’s receiving.

“For me it’s a gift spreading joy and happiness for everyone. People need some good news in these dark times,” he said.

Robitaille doesn’t know what’s next for him. But he’ll keep posting his videos, hoping they bring smiles and a few minutes of joy to those who need it.

Advertisement

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Turkey slaps ad ban on Twitter under new social media law – The Guardian

Published

 on


By Can Sezer and Daren Butler

ISTANBUL (Reuters) – Ankara has imposed advertising bans on Twitter, Periscope and Pinterest after they failed to appoint local representatives in Turkey under a new social media law, according to decisions published on Tuesday.

Under the law, which critics say stifles dissent, social media companies that do not appoint such representatives are liable for a series of penalties, including the latest move by the Information and Communication Technologies Authority (BTK).

The law allows authorities to remove content from platforms, rather than blocking access as they did in the past. It has caused concern as people turn more to online platforms after Ankara tightened its grip on mainstream media.

The latest decisions in the country’s Official Gazette said the advertising bans went into effect from Tuesday. Twitter, its live-streaming app Periscope, and image sharing app Pinterest were not immediately available to comment.

Deputy Transport Minister Omer Fatih Sayan said Twitter and Pinterest’s bandwidth would be cut by 50% in April and by 90% in May. Twitter said last month it would shut down Periscope by March due to declining usage.

“We are determined to do whatever is necessary to protect the data, privacy and rights of our nation,” Sayan said on Twitter. “We will never allow digital fascism and disregard of rules to prevail in Turkey,” he said, echoing tough comments by President Tayyip Erdogan.

On Monday, Facebook Inc joined other companies in saying it would appoint a local representative, but added it would withdraw the person if it faced pressure regarding what is allowed on its platform.

YouTube, owned by Alphabet Inc’s Google, said a month ago it would abide the new law, which the government says enhances local oversight of foreign companies.

In previous months Facebook, YouTube and Twitter had faced fines in Turkey for not complying. Companies that do not abide the law will ultimately have their bandwidth slashed, essentially blocking access.

Erdogan said last week that those who control data can establish “digital dictatorships by disregarding democracy, the law, rights and freedoms”. He vowed to defend what he described as the country’s “cyber homeland”.

(Reporting by Can Sezer; Writing by Daren Butler; Editing by Michael Perry and Jonathan Spicer)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Reminder: Deadline for RNAO's Media Awards is Feb. 26 – Canada NewsWire

Published

 on


TORONTO, Jan. 18, 2021 /CNW/ – COVID-19 dominated the news headlines in 2020 and journalists worked exceptionally hard to bring us the news on the thousands of people who have died from the virus, the nurses who take care of the sick and the key policy issues that need our attention. To honour the media, the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO) is inviting journalists to submit their outstanding coverage on COVID-19 and other nursing and health-care reporting for its Media Awards competition.

Stories published or broadcast in Ontario in 2020 will be judged by a committee of journalists and nurses selected by RNAO, the professional association that shapes health and nursing policy.

Previous winners include journalists from major media outlets such as CBC’s The National, Global News, Ottawa Citizen, as well as smaller media outlets such as The Manitoulin Expositor and Arnprior Chronicle-Guide. Their work shed light on issues such as the opioid crisis, elder assault, alcohol consumption, funding for life-savings drugs, and a revolutionary dementia screening tool developed for Indigenous populations.

Nominations for the Media Awards must be received via the online submission form no later than Friday, Feb. 26, 2021.

Categories for the competition include:

Community newspaper

  • Best news coverage
  • Best in-depth feature or series

Daily newspaper

  • Best news coverage
  • Best in-depth feature or series

Radio

  • Best news coverage
  • Best in-depth feature or series

Television

  • Best news coverage
  • Best in-depth feature or series

Online

  • Best story
  • Best in-depth feature or series

Winners will be announced online in the spring, and presented with their awards during RNAO’s Annual General Meeting in June 2021. Please note that journalists may only submit one entry per person. For the complete list of criteria and to fill out an entry form, visit RNAO.ca/MediaAwards. Eligible stories must have been published or broadcast during the 2020 calendar year.

The Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO) is the professional association representing registered nurses, nurse practitioners and nursing students in Ontario. Since 1925, RNAO has advocated for healthy public policy, promoted excellence in nursing practice, increased nurses’ contribution to shaping the health system, and influenced decisions that affect nurses and the public they serve. For more information about RNAO, visit RNAO.ca or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

SOURCE Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario

For further information: about the awards, please contact: Marion Zych, Director of Communications, Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO), Phone: 416-408-5605 / 1-800-268-7199 ext. 209, Cell: 647-406-5605, [email protected]; Victoria Alarcon, Communications Specialist/Coordinator, Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO), 1-800-268-7199 ext. 211, 416-408-5610, [email protected]

Related Links

https://rnao.ca/

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Blocked from social media, extremists discuss turning to radios to plan attacks, FCC warns – CTV News

Published

 on


The U.S. government is warning that groups could rely on radio equipment as an alternative to social media to plan future criminal activities.

In a stark warning Sunday, the Federal Communications Commission’s enforcement bureau said people coordinating or conducting criminal activity over radio waves are breaking the law.

“The Bureau has become aware of discussions on social media platforms suggesting that certain radio services regulated by the Commission may be an alternative to social media platforms for groups to communicate and coordinate future activities,” the FCC said in its warning Sunday. “Individuals using radios in the Amateur or Personal Radio Services in this manner may be subject to severe penalties, including significant fines, seizure of the offending equipment, and, in some cases, criminal prosecution.”

The FCC licenses certain signals for people to broadcast over radio waves. Those messages are generally protected by the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment. But the FCC reminded radio licensees and operators that it is prohibited to transmit “communications intended to facilitate a criminal act.” People are also not allowed to encode their messages to obscure their meaning from law enforcement.

The laws governing airwaves apply to amateurs broadcasting with personal ham radios, which can reach long distances. But they also apply to people using Citizens Band (CB) radios commonly used for communication between truckers — or even walkie-talkies.

In the wake of the January 6 Capitol riots, Facebook, Twitter and other mainstream social networks have become more vigilant about policing people who use their platforms to plan or incite attacks. They have booted off several high-profile radicals and thousands of groups and users who the platforms say engage in harmful conspiracy theories and other violence or hate speech.

Similarly, Amazon, Apple and Google effectively took Parler off the internet. Parler, the alternative social network popular with conservatives, had been surging in popularity in recent months. But the platform failed to rein in hate-filled, violent speech, Big Tech companies allege. Amazon, Apple and Google said that unmoderated speech could lead to another violent attack.

In response, Parler sued Amazon last week, alleging an antitrust violation, breach of contract and interference with the company’s business relationships with users. The complaint calls Amazon Web Services’ decision a “death blow” to Parler.

“Without AWS, Parler is finished as it has no way to get online,” the complaint said. “And a delay of granting this TRO by even one day could also sound Parler’s death knell as President Trump and others move on to other platforms.”

Amazon said that Parler’s lawsuit has “no merit.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending