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Six Nations art show goes virtual – Rochester Beacon

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The pot Katsitsionne Fox made is a vessel, but it is also a story.

The slightly tapered cylindrical pot is circled by three rows of stylized waves of water that stand out in bas relief. In the water sits an infant. Above the water in a starry sky, a full moon looks down on the infant as if watching over the baby.

The vessel Fox fashioned is one of a series called Life Givers Pottery, says Fox, who is a member of the Bear Clan of the Akwesasne Mohawk nation. This pot’s story is told by the clay from which she fashioned the pot, which is the earth’s life-giving energy, she explains. The pot shows an infant in water because in the womb, our first home, we are bathed water. Women, who bear children in their wombs, are connected to the Grandmother Moon.

Fox’s pot is on exhibit at the Hodinöhsö:ni’ Art Show, which kicked off Nov. 6 online. Winners of the juried show were announced that day.

Founded four years ago by Ganondagan site manager Peter Jemison, the Hodinöhsö:ni’ show features works by artists from the six Haudenosaunee Nations: Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca and Tuscarora. Works in the show range from traditional Haudenosaunee media like basketry and beadwork to contemporary forms like photography and painting. Forty-three of the 111 artists who submitted work were selected for the juried show.

Unlike many contemporary western artists who look at the work they create as a purely aesthetic creation produced only for the sake of art, Six Nations art traditionally is rooted in function, Fox says. Pots would be pleasing to the eye, but they were made not just to look at but to cook in or hold water. To traditional Six Nations people, whose languages had no word corresponding to the English word art, the distinction between art and craft would not be meaningful.  

Like Fox, some but not necessarily all modern Six Nations artists use traditional forms or a modern variation on traditional forms to tell a story, says Jemison, an artist himself. 

“Not all of the artists, but some of the artists, are inspired by stories that are part of our oral tradition,” he says. They go from our creations story to our story of the unification of our five nations to one of our prophets who came and gave a message for the assistance of our people in the year 1799. That is a starting point for some.

“There are others who have taken a traditional form and changed it to a contemporary style.  They borrow the traditional form like a piece of pottery in terms of the shape and roughly the way the top edge is finished. But the subject matter on the pottery, the images, take it into a new realm, something more contemporary, issues that the artist is concerned about.”

The Hodinöhsö:ni’ show’s five divisions—beadwork, basketry, traditional arts, two-dimensional fine art and sculpture—allow artists to mix traditional and contemporary forms and materials or to stick strictly to traditional forms and materials. 

Artwork that won first place in 2019.

Basketry and beadwork entries could, for example, be fashioned from traditional materials like stone, wood bone, hickory bark or moose hair or could use modern materials. Beadwork could be traditional forms like wampum belts or moccasins or more contemporary objects. Two-dimensional entries could be paintings, drawing or photographs, but could also include mixed media. 

Fox, for example, did not turn the vessel she made on a wheel but instead crafted it from clay much as her foremothers would have done. She did use some modern glazes.

Unlike past Hodinöhsö:ni’ shows in which art works were available for viewing at the Seneca Art and Culture Center at the Ganondagan State Historic Site in Victor, the 2020 show will virtual. An online catalog is available at the Ganondagan web site. All works are available for purchase. 

Holding the show online instead of exhibiting works in the show’s usual space in the center’s auditorium would not have been his first choice, Jemison says. But while COVID-19 forced organizers into the online format, the change has meant that more entries could be displayed and that they could be on exhibit longer. Initially slated to end Dec. 31, the show now might continue into 2021. 

Will Astor is Rochester Beacon senior writer.

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Expanding the arts and culture sector in Newfoundland and Labrador – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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The spotlights inside Newfoundland and Labrador theatres have rarely gone this long without heating up and wrapping the province’s performers in light. Gone is the audible applause of the audience, now stuck in their homes in front of a screen.

As performers are forced to find new ways to share their work with the public, the delivery of a promised increase in provincial funding to ArtsNL is a relief to many who work in the arts.

Reg Winsor, executive director at ArtsNL, said that for a number of years ArtsNL had been communicating with the government about an increase in grant applications.

“The number of applications that we were receiving, the demand on the funds that were available … we only had the ability to fund a percentage of the projects that were being submitted,” Winsor said. “Through conversations with the community, we indicated where we were and the funding that really was needed for us to move forward, and the community rallied behind that.”

Courtney Brown, artistic associate with theatre company Mindless Theatrics, was involved in those conversations. She says ArtsNL is often an entry point for young artists.

And there is no shortage of emerging artists in the province.

“There were also new companies and new festivals springing up, which is fantastic, but there weren’t the funds there to support the growth of the community,” Brown said.

Alongside fellow theatre producer Robert Chafe, Brown and many others petitioned the provincial government to fund arts and culture, which is so often promoted in tourism ads alongside images of pastoral scenes, icebergs, puffins and houses of all colours.

The response was an increase in funding from $2 million per year to $5 million per year over a four-year period that began in 2019. All political parties in the province agreed to the increase.

“(Chafe) called it a game-changing investment and I think that’s true,” Brown said. “It’s a groundbreaking step that will have reverberating effects on the culture of this place for a generation.”

Daniel Rumbolt, interim director of Eastern Edge Gallery in downtown St. John’s, said that if it weren’t for government funding, he has no idea how his career would have progressed.

“Art projects are expensive for materials and studio space, but it’s the mentality here that art actually does equal work,” Rumbolt said. “I would have stagnated very quickly if I wasn’t able to try new things and apply for funding.”

It’s easy to see the role art plays in the community just by taking a casual stroll through downtown, looking at the painted alleyways, the murals on the sides of buildings or simply on the clothes that people wear, he said.

But it is sometimes taken for granted how that art got there in the first place.

“We’re used to seeing the final product in a gallery or in a shop somewhere,” he said. “We love to celebrate our tourism industry and our arts and culture industry, and that doesn’t come out of nowhere. It takes a lot of hard work to make it happen.”

Chafe, who is the artistic director of Artistic Fraud of Newfoundland, says he’s happy to see, despite a change in leadership, Premier Andrew Furey is honouring the commitment by announcing on Nov. 25 this year’s funding increase of $1 million.

“Everyone knows the circumstance that our province is in, so the artists of this province certainly weren’t making this ask lightly,” Chafe said. “But government’s own numbers were such that their investment in arts and culture was coming back at least ten-fold.”

Chafe says they didn’t encounter anyone who didn’t understand the value of the arts and culture sector, but an argument had to be put forward specifically about ArtsNL.

“It is one of the few arms-length government agencies that is directly putting money into the coffers of small, unaffiliated, independent artists, for the creation of artwork that eventually, if successful, goes on to make the albums, the films, the theatre shows, the dance shows that create the cultural landmark that is Newfoundland,” he said. “When we made that case very carefully, we made the case for the growth in the sector, and they heard us.”

Andrew Waterman reports on East Coast culture.

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Stephenville's Jesse Renouf finds a story behind the art – SaltWire Network

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Jesse Renouf, 23, has found a way to channel his creative energies and make a living for himself.

His art store, Treasures by Jesse, first opened in Stephenville in June 2017.

Run by Jesse and his family, the store offers a wide array of Jesse’s art, including pebble art, paintings, painted mailboxes, tissue boxes, and more.

While Jesse always had an interest in art, his passion was piqued while completing the Film and Video Production program at the College of the North Atlantic just three years ago.

“Within Film and Video, there was an art course and he loved it,” said Jesse’s mother Judy.

Jesse Renouf proudly shows off one of the walls of art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED – Contributed

 

The family was able to draw on Jesse’s newfound passion to open Treasures by Jesse once he completed the program later the same year.

“We started Googling ideas and that’s where he started with the basic pebble, and then started trying more challenging pieces,” said Judy. “Three years later, here we are.”

The store also provides Jesse, who has autism, an opportunity to socialize – he gets to interact with customers and engage in conversation.

In fact, he has a table set up at the store and often lets visitors watch him paint to give them a sense of the process.

“It gives customers an idea what the story is all about when it comes to painting,” he said.

When he sells a painting, it makes him feel appreciated.

“I feel very proud when someone comes in and buys my artwork and they’re happy,” he said.

Jesse speaks passionately about his work. He is always able to find a story behind the art.

For example, he talks imaginatively of how a painting of a clothesline evokes familiarity to any Newfoundlander.

“It gives customers attention to a type of chore that can be done on a beautiful day outside,” he said. “Hanging the laundry, drying over time. There’s the grass, the waves, the wind blowing the clothes in a breeze. It’s a very beautiful type of day outside, you can tell in this type of pebble artwork.”

Other paintings depict Newfoundland touchstones, including mummers, jellybean row, fishing boats and lighthouses – in each case, Jesse perceives the history behind the object.

He also loves to paint beloved cartoon characters such as Elmo, Spongebob Squarepants, and Homer Simpson.

Some of the art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED - Contributed
Some of the art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED – Contributed

 

Teamwork

Treasures by Jesse is run as a team, with the assistance of Jesse’s mom Judy, his dad Wayne, and his co-worker Trudie Jesso.

“We are working together to make my business stronger,” said Jesse.

The first step is buying the canvasses. Jesse does all the painting on these.

For the pebble art, Jesse and Trudie work together to construct the painting and piece the materials – including pebbles, sea glass, and driftwood – together.

According to Jesse, it’s like putting together a jigsaw puzzle.

The paintings are left to dry and then Judy is tasked with coating the paintings.

Meanwhile, Wayne does all the woodworking.

The pebbles, sea glass and driftwood used in Jesse’s art is collected along the beaches.

Cleaning and sanitizing these materials is part of the process.

Local residents also donate materials. Judy felt this was indicative of the type of support Jesse gets from the community.

“People do support him,” she said.

Treasures by Jesse is open year-round.

Art can be purchased in-person at the store, located at 143 Main St. in Stephenville, or ordered for shipping online.

To learn more about Treasures by Jesse, visit www.treasuresbyjesse.com


Behind the Business is a regular feature that introduces you to local businesspeople. Want to suggest someone that should be featured? Email your idea to [email protected]

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Stephenville's Jesse Renouf finds a story behind the art – The Journal Pioneer

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Jesse Renouf, 23, has found a way to channel his creative energies and make a living for himself.

His art store, Treasures by Jesse, first opened in Stephenville in June 2017.

Run by Jesse and his family, the store offers a wide array of Jesse’s art, including pebble art, paintings, painted mailboxes, tissue boxes, and more.

While Jesse always had an interest in art, his passion was piqued while completing the Film and Video Production program at the College of the North Atlantic just three years ago.

“Within Film and Video, there was an art course and he loved it,” said Jesse’s mother Judy.

Jesse Renouf proudly shows off one of the walls of art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED – Contributed

 

The family was able to draw on Jesse’s newfound passion to open Treasures by Jesse once he completed the program later the same year.

“We started Googling ideas and that’s where he started with the basic pebble, and then started trying more challenging pieces,” said Judy. “Three years later, here we are.”

The store also provides Jesse, who has autism, an opportunity to socialize – he gets to interact with customers and engage in conversation.

In fact, he has a table set up at the store and often lets visitors watch him paint to give them a sense of the process.

“It gives customers an idea what the story is all about when it comes to painting,” he said.

When he sells a painting, it makes him feel appreciated.

“I feel very proud when someone comes in and buys my artwork and they’re happy,” he said.

Jesse speaks passionately about his work. He is always able to find a story behind the art.

For example, he talks imaginatively of how a painting of a clothesline evokes familiarity to any Newfoundlander.

“It gives customers attention to a type of chore that can be done on a beautiful day outside,” he said. “Hanging the laundry, drying over time. There’s the grass, the waves, the wind blowing the clothes in a breeze. It’s a very beautiful type of day outside, you can tell in this type of pebble artwork.”

Other paintings depict Newfoundland touchstones, including mummers, jellybean row, fishing boats and lighthouses – in each case, Jesse perceives the history behind the object.

He also loves to paint beloved cartoon characters such as Elmo, Spongebob Squarepants, and Homer Simpson.

Some of the art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED - Contributed
Some of the art displayed at Treasures by Jesse. CONTRIBUTED – Contributed

 

Teamwork

Treasures by Jesse is run as a team, with the assistance of Jesse’s mom Judy, his dad Wayne, and his co-worker Trudie Jesso.

“We are working together to make my business stronger,” said Jesse.

The first step is buying the canvasses. Jesse does all the painting on these.

For the pebble art, Jesse and Trudie work together to construct the painting and piece the materials – including pebbles, sea glass, and driftwood – together.

According to Jesse, it’s like putting together a jigsaw puzzle.

The paintings are left to dry and then Judy is tasked with coating the paintings.

Meanwhile, Wayne does all the woodworking.

The pebbles, sea glass and driftwood used in Jesse’s art is collected along the beaches.

Cleaning and sanitizing these materials is part of the process.

Local residents also donate materials. Judy felt this was indicative of the type of support Jesse gets from the community.

“People do support him,” she said.

Treasures by Jesse is open year-round.

Art can be purchased in-person at the store, located at 143 Main St. in Stephenville, or ordered for shipping online.

To learn more about Treasures by Jesse, visit www.treasuresbyjesse.com


Behind the Business is a regular feature that introduces you to local businesspeople. Want to suggest someone that should be featured? Email your idea to [email protected]

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