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Social media can lead to body dissatisfaction in new moms says U of G study

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A new University of Guelph study finds social media posts, often meant to inspire new mothers to quickly lose their baby weight, can do more harm than good.

The study, from researches in the College of Social and Applied Human Sciences (CSAHS), finds many moms can develop poor attitudes about eating and become discouraged after scrolling through “fit-spiration” posts.

Waterloo mom Sarah Monette said she sees those posts often. In some cases, social media feeds are plastered with before-and-after pictures of women who have shed the baby weight in what can seem like record time.

“How do you look like that after just having a kid?” asks Monette.

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She has her hands full taking care of two kids, 6-month-old Maddison, and almost four-year-old Graham. While much of her time is dedicated to mom duties she finds it hard not to compare herself to other mothers on social media.

“Of course I’d like to be thinner and fitter but the reality is when you have a newborn you don’t have a lot of time. Sometimes it’s hard to find time to even take a shower,” admitted Monette.

Waterloo mom Sarah Monette plays with her 6-month-old Maddison. (CTV News/Spencer Turcotte)

U of G RESEARCH

The research team heard from more than 130 postpartum mothers of infants under six months old. Half of the participants viewed dozen of body-focused social media posts, while the other half looked at posts on infant feeding tips. The moms who viewed body-focused posts reported higher levels of inspiration to be active but also higher body dissatisfaction levels, poorer body image, poorer eating attitudes and thoughts of restrained eating.

“Not only did looking at those body-focused messages have a short-term effect, but we actually measured a month later after they had that exposure, what happened? And those folks still felt worse about their body image and had sustained disordered eating behaviours,” Haines told CTV News.

Haines said those lingering behaviours are concerning as the impact can last long after you put your phone down.

“I think the main message is finding something that you enjoy and a way to enjoy both your baby and your body,” suggested Haines.

SETTING REALISTIC POST-PREGNANCY GOALS

Oh Baby Fitness in Cambridge offers pre- and post-natal fitness classes that can help women set more realistic post-pregnancy goals.

“Why are we expecting them to then jump into a boot camp style class or a HIIT-style class?” said owner Andrea Ryan.

Each class begins with tips on how the new moms can workout safely by ensuring they aren’t over-exerting themselves.

“If you’re having a day where your baby just wants to be held, we’re going to do our exercises but instead of using weights or resistance bands, we’re going to use the baby instead,” explained Ryan.

Ryan said it is important to build that confidence but without the unnecessary pressure.

“The amount of clients that feel the pressure of society to bounce back and just look like they’ve never birthed a human is quite shocking,” Ryan said.

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The media’s road to ruin its own credibility in war on Trump – New York Post

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The media’s road to ruin its own credibility in war on Trump  New York Post

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I'm a parent with an active social media brand: Here's what you need to check on your child's social media right now – CNN

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I’m a parent with an active social media brand: Here’s what you need to check on your child’s social media right now  CNN

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Why social media makes you feel bad

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Have you ever found yourself scrolling through social media and noticed you felt a bit down? Maybe a little envious? Why aren’t you on a yacht? Running a startup? Looking amazing 24/7?

The good news is you are not alone. Although social media has some benefits, it can also make us feel a little depressed.

Why does social media make us feel bad?

As humans we inherently compare ourselves to others to determine our self-worth. Psychologists call this social comparison theory.

We primarily make two types of comparisons: upward and downward comparisons.

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Upward comparisons occur when we compare ourselves to someone else (in real life or on social media) and feel they are better than us (an unfavourable comparison for us) in whatever domain we are assessing (such as status, beauty, abilities, success, and so on).

For example, comparing your day at work to your friend’s post from the ski fields (we’re looking at you Dave!) is likely to be an upward comparison. Another example is making appearance comparisons which can make you feel worse about yourself or your looks .

Although upward comparison can sometimes motivate you to do better, this depends on the change being achievable and on your esteem. Research suggests upward comparisons may be particularly damaging if you have low self-esteem.

In contrast, downward comparisons occur when we view ourselves more favourably than the other person – for example, by comparing yourself to someone less fortunate. Downward comparisons make us feel better about ourselves but are rare in social media because people don’t tend to post about the mundane realities of life.

 

Comparisons in social media

Social media showcases the best of people’s lives. It presents a carefully curated version of reality and presents it as fact. Sometimes, as with influencers, this is intentional but often it is unconscious bias. We are just naturally more likely to post when we are happy, on holiday or to share successes – and even then we choose the best version to share.

When we compare ourselves to what we see on social media, we typically make upward comparisons which make us feel worse. We compare ourselves on an average day to others on their best day. In fact, it’s not even their best day. It’s often a perfectly curated, photoshopped, produced, filter-applied moment. It’s not a fair comparison.

That’s not to say social media is all bad. It can help people feel supportedconnected, and get information. So don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. Instead, keep your social media use in check with these tips.

 

Concrete ways you can make yourself feel better about social media

Monitor your reactions. If social media is enjoyable, you may not need to change anything – but if it’s making you exhausted, depressed or anxious, or you are losing time to mindless scrolling, it’s time for change.

Avoid comparisons. Remind yourself that comparing your reality with a selected moment on social media is an unrealistic benchmark. This is especially the case with high-profile accounts who are paid to create perfect content.

Be selective. If you must compare, search for downward comparisons (with those who are worse off) or more equal comparisons to help you feel better. This might include unfollowing celebrities, focusing on real posts by friends, or using reality focused platforms like BeReal.

Redefine success. Influencers and celebrities make luxury seem like the norm. Most people don’t live in pristine homes and sip barista-made coffee in white sheets looking perfect. Consider what real success means to you and measure yourself against that instead.

Practise gratitude. Remind yourself of things that are great in your life, and celebrate your accomplishments (big and small!). Create a “happy me” folder of your favourite life moments, pics with friends, and great pictures of yourself, and look at this if you find yourself falling into the comparison trap.

Unplug. If needed, take a break, or cut down. Avoid mindless scrolling by moving tempting apps to the last page of your phone or use in-built focus features on your device. Alternatively, use an app to temporarily block yourself from social media.

Engage in real life. Sometimes social media makes people notice what is missing in their own lives, which can encourage growth. Get out with friends, start a new hobby, embrace life away from the screen.

Get amongst nature. Nature has health and mood benefits that combat screen time.

Be the change. Avoid only sharing the picture-perfect version of your life and share (in a safe setting) your real life. You’d be surprised how this will resonate with others. This will help you and them feel better.

Seek help. If you are feeling depressed or anxious over a period of time, get support. Talk to your friends, family or a GP about how you are feeling. Alternatively contact one of the support lines like LifelineKids Helpline, or 13Yarn.

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