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Social media deal earns advertisers' 'likes', but not yet all their dollars – The Guardian

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By Martinne Geller

LONDON (Reuters) – Advertisers who boycotted social media are not all rushing back, despite an agreement by Facebook, YouTube and Twitter on how to curb harmful content online.

Unilever, one of the world’s biggest advertisers, told Reuters the move this week was “a good step in the right direction,” but would not say whether it would resume paid advertising on Facebook in the United States next year after stopping over the summer.

Coca-Cola also remains paused on Facebook and Instagram and declined to say if this changed its view. Beam Suntory, maker of Jim Beam bourbon and Courvoisier Cognac, plans to stay away from paid advertising for the rest of 2020 and reassess in 2021 based on how Facebook adjusts its approach.

Over 1,000 advertisers joined a Facebook boycott over concerns it wasn’t doing enough to combat hate speech. U.S. civil rights groups enlisted multinationals to help pressure the social media giant after the June death of George Floyd, an American Black man, in police custody in Minneapolis.

“Brands are very concerned about having any affiliation with the disinformation that runs through the big tech platforms,” said Michael Priem, CEO of advertising technology firm Modern Impact.

Deciding whether to pull ads from social media can be tough. Larger brands can afford to take a stance, but for smaller businesses that have already been hurt by the coronavirus pandemic, “it’s either make it or die,” Priem said.

On Wednesday, the World Federation of Advertisers announced that social media platforms and advertisers had committed to create common definitions of harmful content such as hate speech and harmonized reporting standards.

A Facebook spokeswoman said on Friday that advertisers were returning to the platform.

“For the most part advertisers are coming back because they recognize the efforts we’re making,” the spokeswoman said. “We’re never satisfied. We’ll continue to work with industry and with our clients.”

She said that 95% of the hate speech removed by Facebook is detected before being reported, up from 23% in 2017.

“Digital media is now more than half of all media spending yet is still operating with very few boundaries other than those that are self-imposed or that marketers try to enforce. It’s time for digital platforms to apply content standards properly,” Procter & Gamble’s chief brand officer, Marc Pritchard, said on Wednesday.

The maker of Gillette razors and Pampers diapers said it will “continue to advocate for greater transparency, reporting, and enforcement” directly with platforms and through industry forums.

COMING BACK

Many companies, such as drinks giant Pernod Ricard, returned to Facebook in August after a one-month pause aimed at sending a message.

“I feel very happy … with the outcome. I think it worked,” said Eric Benoist, global marketing director for the maker of Absolut vodka and Martell Cognac. “It was a wake-up call. They heard it loud and clear.”

Some advertisers, like spirits group Diageo, came back following direct engagement with the platform and evidence of action.

“Some progress has been made, but more needs to be done and we think we’re better able to bring about change by working together,” a Diageo spokeswoman said. “We are in the process of resuming paid media and will continue to drive accountability on these pressing issues.”

Campaign organizers remain skeptical and pledged to keep up the heat.

“We cannot assume progress from yet another commitment to change until we see the impact and breadth of policy enforcement by these companies,” said Rashad Robinson, president of Color Of Change, a backer of the Stop Hate for Profit campaign, which organized the boycott.

“As long as these companies continue to abdicate their responsibility to their most vulnerable users, we will continue to call on Congress and regulatory agencies to intervene.” 

(Reporting by Martinne Geller in London; Additional reporting by Sheila Dang in New York and Siddharth Cavale in Bengaluru; Editing by Carmel Crimmins)

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Kelowna woman learns lesson from public shaming on social media

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Image Credit: Shutterstock

October 24, 2020 – 9:16 AM

A Kelowna woman wants others to know of the repercussions of inflammatory social media posts after an experience she had last week.

On Oct. 20, Shelley Hughes saw a man screaming and uttering threats near her home. She posted about it in a neighbourhood Facebook group saying the man looked like a known criminal in the area and a fair number of comments racked up.  She later learned the man was actually a 16-year-old who was having a mental breakdown, she said.

“Things got a little bit out of control on the Facebook group,” Hughes said, adding that she got in touch with the teenager’s mother and learned about their story.

 

“We have to be mindful about what we post, including me, because I was participating in the rhetoric,” Hughes said. “Yes we do post to watch out for each other but we have to be clear. It was a lesson for everyone how quickly it can get out of hand.”

Hughes posted a follow up to her original post, explaining the family had fallen on hard times.

“We need to pull together,” she said. “We need to bring some compassion. It takes a village so let’s be this village.”

The Facebook group is meant to be a neighbourhood watch but sometimes the comments get out of hand, she said.

Her message is to be mindful of the facts before turning to social media.

“It can be used as a useful, positive tool but also in a very bad way,” Hughes said.

She hopes by sharing the story and the lesson she learned that others will follow suit. She said the community has been supportive when she posted a second time explaining the situation.

“Our community needs to get back to being that village and slamming people on social media is not the way to do it. Have I learned a lesson? I have. What do we do with a lesson? We learn from it and we respond to it,” Hughes said.

 

Source:- iNFOnews

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Stalker who set up 61 social media accounts to harass victim is jailed – Yahoo Canada Sports

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George Coughlan has been jailed for 21 months (Picture: SWNS)George Coughlan has been jailed for 21 months (Picture: SWNS)

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George Coughlan has been jailed for 21 months (Picture: SWNS)

An “extreme stalker” who set up 61 social media accounts to harass his victim has been jailed. 

George Coughlan used 19 fake Instagram profiles to bombard the woman with abuse.

The 33-year-old also hacked into the victim’s CCTV system to spy on her at home and was caught when he sent her a video showing her relaxing in her own living room.

The victim, who knew Coughlan, called police and he was arrested on 29 February this year.

Police seized his phone and discovered between last December and February he had sent hundreds of messages to the woman.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more: Police shut down wedding and Airbnb house party” data-reactid=”37″>Read more: Police shut down wedding and Airbnb house party

Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)

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Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)

In one sinister message, he told her: “I will mek it my dying breath to mek ur life end too. And his.

“On the baby’s graves n my dadsa grave. That’s how much I mean it now. F***in dead to me.

“N u will be f***ed soon now. U will av nothin (sic).”

When the victim blocked Coughlan’s messages from one account, he issued a sinister warning using the profile name whymekitworse.

He added: “Uv av to do it don’t ya. Ok u blocked me once that’s it.

“I’m tekkij to the next step. Expect a visit. I ay even say in wen (sic).”

Police discovered he had searched phrases including “log into iCloud without verification” and “free mobile phone tracker without user knowing”.

Coughlan also researched phone spyware to track SMS messages, calls, social apps and GPS movements.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more: Fake coronavirus marshals stealing from homes after conning their way inside” data-reactid=”66″>Read more: Fake coronavirus marshals stealing from homes after conning their way inside

Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)

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Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)

Coughlan, of Wolverhampton, admitted stalking involving serious alarm and distress.

On Friday he was jailed for 21 months at Wolverhampton Court and handed a five-year restraining order banning him from contacting the victim.

Inspector Cate Webb-Jones, of West Midlands Police Public Protection Unit said: “Stalking is a serious crime, an invasion of someone’s privacy, and as we’ve seen with this case can result in a significant jail term.

“Coughlan went to extreme lengths to exert control and intrude on his victim’s life.

“It was hugely upsetting and she was living day by day in fear. It’s simply not acceptable.

“Social media and easily accessible technology, such as spyware to track mobile phones, is giving stalkers more tools to harass victims and potentially put them in more danger.”

<h2 class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Coronavirus: what happened today” data-reactid=”93″>Coronavirus: what happened today

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Stalker who set up 61 social media accounts to harass victim is jailed – Yahoo Canada Sports

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George Coughlan has been jailed for 21 months (Picture: SWNS)George Coughlan has been jailed for 21 months (Picture: SWNS)

View photos

George Coughlan has been jailed for 21 months (Picture: SWNS)

An “extreme stalker” who set up 61 social media accounts to harass his victim has been jailed. 

George Coughlan used 19 fake Instagram profiles to bombard the woman with abuse.

The 33-year-old also hacked into the victim’s CCTV system to spy on her at home and was caught when he sent her a video showing her relaxing in her own living room.

The victim, who knew Coughlan, called police and he was arrested on 29 February this year.

Police seized his phone and discovered between last December and February he had sent hundreds of messages to the woman.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more: Police shut down wedding and Airbnb house party” data-reactid=”37″>Read more: Police shut down wedding and Airbnb house party

Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)

View photos

Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)

In one sinister message, he told her: “I will mek it my dying breath to mek ur life end too. And his.

“On the baby’s graves n my dadsa grave. That’s how much I mean it now. F***in dead to me.

“N u will be f***ed soon now. U will av nothin (sic).”

When the victim blocked Coughlan’s messages from one account, he issued a sinister warning using the profile name whymekitworse.

He added: “Uv av to do it don’t ya. Ok u blocked me once that’s it.

“I’m tekkij to the next step. Expect a visit. I ay even say in wen (sic).”

Police discovered he had searched phrases including “log into iCloud without verification” and “free mobile phone tracker without user knowing”.

Coughlan also researched phone spyware to track SMS messages, calls, social apps and GPS movements.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more: Fake coronavirus marshals stealing from homes after conning their way inside” data-reactid=”66″>Read more: Fake coronavirus marshals stealing from homes after conning their way inside

Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)

View photos

Some of the threatening messages George Coughlan sent to the victim (Picture: SWNS)

Coughlan, of Wolverhampton, admitted stalking involving serious alarm and distress.

On Friday he was jailed for 21 months at Wolverhampton Court and handed a five-year restraining order banning him from contacting the victim.

Inspector Cate Webb-Jones, of West Midlands Police Public Protection Unit said: “Stalking is a serious crime, an invasion of someone’s privacy, and as we’ve seen with this case can result in a significant jail term.

“Coughlan went to extreme lengths to exert control and intrude on his victim’s life.

“It was hugely upsetting and she was living day by day in fear. It’s simply not acceptable.

“Social media and easily accessible technology, such as spyware to track mobile phones, is giving stalkers more tools to harass victims and potentially put them in more danger.”

<h2 class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Coronavirus: what happened today” data-reactid=”93″>Coronavirus: what happened today

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Click here to sign up to the latest news and information with our daily Catch-up newsletter” data-reactid=”94″>Click here to sign up to the latest news and information with our daily Catch-up newsletter

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