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Social media scheme swindles the most vulnerable – Trail Times

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An online Pyramid scheme is fleecing social media users of their hard-earned cash.

The Better Business Bureau says that they have received almost 70 calls reporting a social media group asking users to join a “Blessing Loom”.

Related read: Greater Trail RCMP crime-reporting tool goes online

The lure of the ‘Loom’ is that a message is sent most often through social media outlets like Instagram or Facebook from a friend, family member or stranger that invites the individual to a Blessing Loom – an opportunity to earn money while also “blessing others.”

With a small investment of about $100 paid through PayPal or another digital payment service, a person can spread the wealth and see a huge return on the money invested. The more people recruited, the more money the individual can make, as the circle widens and everyone makes loads of cash.

“The Blessing Loom is similar to the ‘Secret Sister’ pyramid scheme that makes its rounds during the holidays,” explained Karla Laird, Manager for Community and Public Relations at BBB serving Mainland BC. “It has also been called a ‘Money Board’, ‘Gifting Circle’ and ‘Sou-Sou’ (sometimes spelled ‘SuSu’).

The trouble is that this is a pyramid scheme that relies on recruiting new individuals to keep the scam afloat. Once people stop participating, the money supply stops as well. The reality is that participants rarely, if ever, get paid and usually end up losing their investment as well as having their personal information compromised.

The scam is particularly effective on those who are most vulnerable, because, on the surface, it seems like a quick and easy fix to their financial problems.

“Many of the consumer reports shared that the victims believed they were being invited to join a legitimate social media community for people trying to support those in financial crisis,” added Laird. “Always remember that while social media is a great place to connect with friends and family, it is also a place where scammers and con artists lurk. Always stay informed and exercise caution”.

How to avoid social media scams:

– Recognize Pyramid schemes and other promises of quick profits.

– Be skeptical and do your research before accepting any offer on social media.

– Monitor friend requests, and do not accept from people you don’t know or duplicates from those you are already friends with.

– Simply don’t join any business venture through social media.

– Check business rating and reviews on BBB.org.


sports@trailtimes.ca

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Group wants Parliament, courts to hold social media to same standard as publishers – Campbell River Mirror

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Friends of Canadian Broadcasting is calling on Parliament to restrain social media platforms from distributing harmful or hateful content by applying the same laws that publishers and broadcasters already face.

The lobby group’s executive director says courts should be penalizing social media platforms that knowingly spread harmful content.

Daniel Bernhard made the comments shortly after Friends of Canadian Broadcasting released a research paper that argues social media platforms aren’t passive or neutral when it comes to content distribution.

The report says platforms like Facebook and YouTube routinely exercise editorial control by promoting content that users have never asked to see or sometimes conceal content without consulting users.

The report says traditional publishers can be held partly liable under Canadian law for harmful content but the same standard hasn’t been applied to internet platforms.

Facebook didn’t immediately comment on the research paper or Bernhard’s remarks.

The report was released as members of Parliament return to Ottawa this week and the Trudeau government prepares to lay out its plans for the coming session.

Among other things, Bernhard said that social media tell regulators and advertisers that they have very detailed knowledge of what’s being posted on their platforms and exercise control over what is made available to the public.

“(Facebook CEO) Mark Zuckerberg has claimed under oath that Facebook takes down 99 per cent of terrorist content before a human user ever sees it (and) 89 per cent of hate speech supposedly comes down before a human ever sees it,” Bernhard said.

He said that means Facebook in particular, and social media in general, should have the same responsibility to abide by Canadian laws as conventional publishers and broadcasters.

“If a judge finds that the content is illegal and that a platform has amplified it, the platform should be held responsible. And not only that, but that the penalty should be commensurate to their revenue and size so it hurts accordingly,” Bernhard said.

David Paddon, The Canadian Press

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'Trillion Dollar Team' is the social media page you must follow to pursue your dreams – Net Newsledger

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Whats the best way to stay on track towards bringing your dreams to reality? As per available data and expert comments, it is anything which acts as a continuous or timely reminder of the goals. It ensures one stays motivated and takes away any chances of complacency. As per its founder, this is the idea behind the Instagram account ‘The Trillion Dollar Team’

This is a community page and posts pictures of lavish lifestyle which are nothing short of goals for everyone. These pictures usually include swanky cars, private jets, picturesque homes, limited edition watches, dream destinations, etc. The instagram handle for this account is @the.tdt

In a candid conversation, the founder of this page shared his idea behind starting this page. He said none of the pictures belong to him however are pictures he would like to click someday. Also, he believes that its better to post these at a community level on social media because all these pictures combined will inspire everyone assoociated with the account and shall bring positive reinforcement for everyone.

In a candid conversation he stated, “I hace started this community with a goal to remind like minded people of their goals on a daily basis. A personal collection of these pictures and wall photos would have been effective for me but why restrict the posutive vibes to myself when I can share them with everyone in the world. The pictures you see on this account do not belong to me and are handpicked from different sources and shared here for purely inspirational purposes. Most of the times, I receive great love from the owners of the actual photos as my posts appreciate their achievements and respect people for having a lifestyle that is a dream for millions of people.”

It is worth mentioning that such accounts have been loved by the masses and have found great success in the past as well. In early 2015, an internet community titled ‘Rich kids of snapchat’ based on a similar idea of one stop collection of all thats amazing gained immense success and has inspired various creators worldwide.

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Group wants Parliament, courts to hold social media to same standard as publishers – Yorkton This Week

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TORONTO — Friends of Canadian Broadcasting is calling on Parliament to restrain social media platforms from distributing harmful or hateful content by applying the same laws that publishers and broadcasters already face.

The lobby group’s executive director says courts should be penalizing social media platforms that knowingly spread harmful content.

article continues below

Daniel Bernhard made the comments shortly after Friends of Canadian Broadcasting released a research paper that argues social media platforms aren’t passive or neutral when it comes to content distribution.

The report says platforms like Facebook and YouTube routinely exercise editorial control by promoting content that users have never asked to see or sometimes conceal content without consulting users.

The report says traditional publishers can be held partly liable under Canadian law for harmful content but the same standard hasn’t been applied to internet platforms.

Facebook didn’t immediately comment on the research paper or Bernhard’s remarks.

The report was released as members of Parliament return to Ottawa this week and the Trudeau government prepares to lay out its plans for the coming session.

Among other things, Bernhard said that social media tell regulators and advertisers that they have very detailed knowledge of what’s being posted on their platforms and exercise control over what is made available to the public.

“(Facebook CEO) Mark Zuckerberg has claimed under oath that Facebook takes down 99 per cent of terrorist content before a human user ever sees it (and) 89 per cent of hate speech supposedly comes down before a human ever sees it,” Bernhard said.

He said that means Facebook in particular, and social media in general, should have the same responsibility to abide by Canadian laws as conventional publishers and broadcasters.

“If a judge finds that the content is illegal and that a platform has amplified it, the platform should be held responsible. And not only that, but that the penalty should be commensurate to their revenue and size so it hurts accordingly,” Bernhard said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 21, 2020.

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