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SoftBank Leads $200 Million Investment In Semiconductor Startup, Boosts Logistics Chip Space – Forbes

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A $200 million funding round led by Japanese billionaire Masayoshi Son’s SoftBank gave a little-known California-based semiconductor startup a boost in the nascent logistics chip space.

SoftBank Group’s Vision Fund 2 led the investment in Wiliot, a four-year-old startup with presence in Australia, Germany, Israel, Taiwan and Ukraine. Previous investors include Amazon Web Services and the venture capital arms of Samsung and Japanese mobile carrier NTT Docomo.

SoftBank’s investment marks a boost for Wiliot, says Mario Morales, group vice president of enabling technologies and semiconductors at market research firm IDC. “Most of these guys have gotten not as much funding as this one,” he notes. “Most of them are running out of money.”

Wiliot, whose stamp-sized chips are designed to allow object identification on a mass scale, could benefit from cross-pollination with the Vision Fund portfolio’s e-commerce and logistics companies, analysts say.

“Vision Fund is spraying billions of dollars on tech firms, and the flow of cash appears almost limitless,” says Neil Mawston, executive director at Strategy Analytics. “Wiliot could potentially work with other Vision Fund investments such as Coupang or Flipkart for leaner e-commerce logistics.”

SoftBank invests in a range of technology companies around the world. Recent deals include investments in the logistics and warehouse robotics sectors. For example, its Vision Fund invested in JD Logistics’ $3.2 billion Hong Kong initial public offerin in May and SoftBank has placed $2.8 billion for a 40% stake in AutoStore, a Norwegian company that specializes in warehouse automation technology for e-commerce.

Wiliot’s encrypted and cloud-enabled chips connect products that move through global supply chains in crates, packaging and on pallets. The startup has raised a total of $270 million in venture capital over time and the latest round was over subscribed, says Stephen Statler, a senior vice president at Wiliot. “We’ve seen a consistent level of interest between financial and strategic investors in what we do,” he says.

Attention to autonomous warehouses, robotics and “smart” retail raise interest in object-finder tech, Statler adds. “One of the basics is to have a real-time view of inventory so when (a customer) does show up, you’re not constantly searching for what you want,” he says.

Wiliot belongs to a small high-tech sub-industry that designs chips for object identification akin to QR coding and RFID (radio-frequency identification) tags, says Morales. The global market for this space spans just 10 startups worth a few tens of millions of dollars, he says.

Over five years, Morales forecasts the space will grow to around $2 billion, but led by half the number of companies that are active now. “The logistics chip industry could eventually be measured in the trillions of units, as every product or thing can potentially be tagged with a battery-less, wireless tracker for real-time inventory management of the demand chain,” he says.

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How To Invest Money To Secure Your Family's Future – The Seeker

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How To Invest Money To Secure Your Family’s Future – The Seeker Newsmagazine Cornwall

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Elon Musk sold nearly $7 billion worth of Tesla stock—here’s how much money you’d have if you’d invested $1,000 in the company 10 years ago – CNBC

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk sold 7.92 million shares of the electric vehicle manufacturer worth about $6.88 billion between Aug. 5 and Aug. 9, according to a series of recent SEC filings.

As of Aug. 9, Tesla shares were valued at about $850 each at the close of trading. That price has fallen by a little over 9% since the close of trading on Aug. 4, when shares were $938 each, according to CNBC tracking.

As for how shareholders would fare longer-term, if you had invested $1,000 in Tesla one year ago, on Aug. 11, 2021, your investment would be up by about 23%, according to CNBC calculations, for a value of around $1,230, as of Aug. 10, 2022.

If you had invested $1,000 five years ago, on Aug. 11, 2017, your investment would be worth around $12,160.

And if you had invested $1,000 on Aug. 11, 2012 and given your investment a decade to grow, you’d have around $145,341 as of Aug. 10, 2022.

Musk’s latest sale comes despite his announcement earlier this year that there were “no further TSLA sales planned” after he sold about $8.4 billion worth of his company shares in April.

So what’s behind this latest move? The billionaire says it’s due to his ongoing legal battle with Twitter.

“In the (hopefully unlikely) event that Twitter forces this deal to close *and* some equity partners don’t come through, it is important to avoid an emergency sale of Tesla stock,” Musk tweeted, after replying yes to a question about if he was done selling shares.

Back in April, Musk announced his intention to buy the social media giant for $44 billion or about $54.20 per share. As of Aug. 10, Twitter shares were valued at about $44 each at the close of trading. A share of Twitter stock was valued at about $45 on April 14th when Musk made his announcement.

By July, however, the SpaceX CEO told Twitter that he wanted to cancel the deal. In a letter to the company, Musk’s lawyers claimed that Twitter failed to provide “information that would allow him ‘to make an independent assessment of the prevalence of fake or spam accounts on Twitter’s platform.'”

Twitter called Musk’s attempt to bail out of the deal a “model of hypocrisy” and said his claims “lack any merit,” according to a legal complaint filed by the company.

Although Musk is now pushing for a public debate with Twitter CEO Parag Agrawal, the head of the microblogging site said he plans to let the courts decide the fate of this deal, with a trial set to begin in October.

When it comes to the stock market, be sure to do your research before investing and remember that a stock’s past performance can’t be used to predict future earnings. An alternative option to investing in individual stocks is to invest in the S&P 500, a stock market index that tracks the stock performance of 500 large U.S. companies.

Although the S&P 500 shrank by nearly 6% compared to this same time period last year, the index has grown by 71.94% over the past five years and 198.58% over the past decade, according to CNBC calculations.

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Canada Pension Plan Investment Board loses 4.2% in Q1, net assets total $523B – Cornwall Seaway News

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TORONTO — Canada Pension Plan Investment Board says its fund, which includes the combination of the base CPP and additional CPP accounts, lost 4.2 per cent in its latest quarter.

CPPIB ended the quarter with net assets of $523 billion, compared to $539 billion at the end of the previous quarter.

The board says the $16 billion decrease in net assets for the quarter consisted of a net loss of $23 billion and $7 billion in net transfers from the Canada Pension Plan.

The board says the fund’s quarterly results were driven by losses in public equity strategies, due to the broad decline in global equity markets.

It also says investments in private equity, credit and real estate contributed modestly to the losses this quarter.

CPPIB CEO John Graham says he expects “turbulence” in the business and investment environment to persist throughout the fiscal year.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug.11, 2022.

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