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'Some may be given as national gifts': China will share its lunar samples with other countries – National Post

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“We will share with the relevant countries and scientists overseas, and some of them may be given as national gifts in accordance with international practices.”

When asked if China would share any samples with the United States, which limits its NASA space agency from directly cooperating with China, Wu said existing U.S. restrictions were “unfortunate.”

“The Chinese government is willing to share lunar samples with like-minded institutions and scientists from various countries,” Wu said.

“To be able to cooperate or not depends on U.S. policy,” Wu said.

China was willing to cooperate with U.S. agencies and scientists on the basis of equal benefit and win-win cooperation, he said.

China has not disclosed the amount of samples that it had retrieved. The plan was to collect 2 kg (4.41 lb) of rocks and soil.

“We will announce this soon,” Hu Hao, chief designer of the third phase of China’s lunar exploration program, told Reuters on the sidelines of the briefing.

“We have not taken them out (of the probe) yet.”

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You can see Uranus, Mars and the moon get close in a rare night sky sight tonight – Yahoo Eurosport UK

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 Uranus and Mars will be visible close together in the night sky tonight, January 21, 2021.
Uranus and Mars will be visible close together in the night sky tonight, January 21, 2021.
Uranus and Mars will be visible close together in the night sky tonight, January 21, 2021.Uranus and Mars will be visible close together in the night sky tonight, January 21, 2021.
Uranus and Mars will be visible close together in the night sky tonight, January 21, 2021.

Look up tonight (Jan. 21) to see Uranus and Mars nestled together in the night sky — just don’t forget your binoculars.

Yesterday (Jan. 20) on Inauguration Day in the U.S., the two planets were in conjunction, meaning they appeared very close together in the sky. Tonight, the planets will share the same “right ascension,” with Mars passing just 1.75 degrees to the north of Uranus, according to Earthsky.org. (Your fist held at arm’s length covers about 10 degrees of sky.) The moon will also be shining nearby, making it a good landmark to start from when looking for the planets.

Uranus, the seventh planet in our solar system, which orbits 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers) from the sun, will be at a magnitude 5.8 in the sky. Meanwhile, Mars, the fourth planet from the sun, which orbits at an average distance of “just” 143.6 million miles (231.1 million km), will be visible at magnitude 0.2. 

The brightest planets in January’s night sky: How to see them (and when)

The lower the magnitude number a cosmic object has, the brighter it is (there are even seriously bright objects with negative magnitudes), so Mars will be significantly brighter in the sky than Uranus. But, while Uranus will be tough to spot, both will still be visible with the help of binoculars, though the planets will be too far separated to fit within a telescope’s field of view, according to in-the-sky.org

To try and find Uranus, first “find the crescent moon and the Red Planet in the couple of hours after it gets dark. Scan your way over from Mars toward the moon, and you should be able to find the faint, bluish disk of Uranus,” NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory said in its monthly “What’s Up” skywatching series. 

Now, while Uranus and Mars will be putting on this show in the night sky, they won’t be the only planets hanging out tonight. Both Jupiter and Saturn are still officially in the evening sky, though the light from the setting sun makes it so they are not visible, according to Earthsky.org.

Email Chelsea Gohd at cgohd@space.com or follow her on Twitter @chelsea_gohd. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

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Mars and Uranus conjunction: How to see the planet's in the sky – Daily Express

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The relatively nearby Mars and the far out Uranus are adorning the night’s sky, and are visible right now. Mars is the planet next out behind Earth in the solar system’s pecking order, while Uranus is the seventh.

However, Uranus is a true giant of the solar system and can be spotted on a clear night when its orbit aligns with Earth’s.

Uranus is a staggering 2.9 billion kilometres from the Sun and takes 84 years to complete an orbit of the star.

The planet aligns with Earth roughly once a year, and this time around it can be seen travelling alongside Mars.

Mars, which has a similar orbit to Earth, has been travelling near to our planet for several months, but as Earth’s orbit is slightly smaller, it is currently outpacing the Red Planet.

Both planets are separated by just 1.75 degrees – with one degree being close to a thumb’s width held at arm’s length.

To spot the two planets, look in the southwest skies come nightfall.

Above the Moon, you will see a ‘star’ with a red hue, which is actually Mars.

As the Moon moves away from Mars, the planet will become more visible as there is less light pollution from our lunar satellite.

READ MORE: NASA InSight’s ‘mole’ fails mission after two years on Mars

“But Mars still shines on a par with the sky’s brightest stars.

“Uranus, on the other hand, is quite faint, well over 150 times fainter than Mars.

“Uranus is said to be the outermost of the sun’s planets visible with the eye alone.

“But seeing it with the eye requires a very dark sky, and probably no Moon (certainly no nearby Moon).”

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B.C. researchers find evidence of ancient predatory sand worms that were two metres long – National Post

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The trace fossils showed feather-like structures around the upper parts of the burrows, which the researchers believe would have been caused by the worms dragging their struggling prey under the ocean floor to eat them.

The lower, horizontal part of the burrow. Photo by Yu-Yen Pan /Simon Frazer University

The study’s lead author, earth sciences student Yu-Yen Pan, said the giant burrows are much larger than other trace fossils of ocean worms found in the past.

“Compared to other trace fossils which are usually only a few tens of centimetres long, this one was huge; two-metres long and two to three centimetres in diameter,” she said in a press release. “The distinctive, feather-like structures around the upper burrow were also unique and no previously studied trace fossil has shown similar features.”

The researchers say that these worms likely would have fed similarly to the bobbit worm, often called the “sand striker.”

Bobbit worms wait in their burrow for unsuspecting prey, then explode upwards, grabbing the prey in their mouths and pulling them back down into the sediment.

Field excursion at Yehliu, Taiwan. Photo by Masakazu Nara /Simon Frazer University

The researchers also found evidence that led them to believe the worms secreted mucus after each feeding that rebuilt and reinforced their burrows, allowing them to lie in wait for their next victim without being seen.

Pan and an international team that studies the ancient sea floor has named the homes of these worms Pennichnus formosae.

According to the study, previous research on Eunicid polychaetes, the family that these ancient worms and bobbit worms belong to, was limited because they only stuck a small portion of their bodies out from the ocean floor.

These trace fossils have allowed researchers to better understand the activity and habits of the ancient species.

Predatory ocean worms have existed for over 400 million years, and while these ancient burrows are long when compared to others that had previously been studied, giant marine worms are not just creatures of the ancient past.

Bobbit worms can grow up to three metres long themselves, and lay in their burrows just beneath the ocean floor today.

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