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Space buffs upset as Canada's 'historically significant' Kennedy Antenna meets scrap metal end – The Province

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The Kennedy Antenna was set up in Ottawa at a Department of National Defence compound in 1962 to track Alouette 1, Canada’s first satellite

Get ready to say goodbye to the Kennedy Antenna – a parabolic dish used to track the 1962 satellite that established Canada as the third country in space.

The Canadian Space Agency says the 60-foot artifact from the country’s pioneering space era will become scrap metal, according to Blacklock’s Reporter.

“This is historically significant,” said Marcus Leech, president of the Canadian Centre for Experimental Radio Astronomy of Smiths Falls, Ont.

“It’s a shame, but the Space Agency succumbed to pressure to remove it.”

The Kennedy Antenna was set up in Ottawa at a Department of National Defence compound to track Alouette 1, Canada’s first satellite.

But “it was left unused for many years,” the CSA wrote in a contract notice to scrap dealers.

Leech said his group was unsuccessful in trying to raise funds to save it from the scrap heap.

“Nobody could raise the budget to simply relocate it, so it’s being demolished,” said Leech.

“Our group worked for about seven years to restore it for use in radio astronomy, but with an exceedingly meager budget and ongoing site access issues it was clear we weren’t going to be successful. The Space Agency asked that we abandon the project. This is sad for us.”

The antenna, named for its now-defunct Massachusetts manufacturer D.S. Kennedy Company, was decommissioned in 1987 while the Alouette satellite remains in space after 58 years with long-expired batteries.

“It is still in orbit but it is not active,” said CSA spokesperson Andrea Matte.

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Is there really life on Venus? How do we find out? – KitchenerToday.com

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Last week, an unlikely research project made a startling discovery: Phosphine gas in the atmosphere of Venus. That’s something that, as far as we know, is created by living organisms. Our efforts to find signs of life on other worlds, and a lot of our space dreaming in general, tend to focus on Mars. But all of a sudden we need to take a closer look at our other planetary neighbour.

So how can we find out if there’s really life right next door? What do we know about Venus and why has it been so hard to figure out so far? What else could possibly cause the presence of Phosphine and what would it mean, to space exploration and everything else, if this is really true?

GUEST: Neel Patel, space reporter, MIT Technology Review

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COVID-19 Today: School, child care cases for Newmarket, York Region, and Ontario – NewmarketToday.ca

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Newmarket (reported Friday, Sept. 25, at 5 p.m.)

Schools

  • 0 school-related cases
  • 0 schools closed

Licensed child care facilities

  • 0 child care centre cases
  • 0 child care centres closed

York Region (reported Frisday, Sept. 25, at 5 p.m.)

Schools

  • 1 school outbreaks*
    • Blue Willow, Woodbridge (1 student, 1 staff)
  • 0 schools closed
  • 12 confirmed cases
  • 7 students
  • 5 staff/visitors
  • 8 (-2) schools under surveillance**:
    • Carrville Mills (1 staff), in Thornhill
    • Little Rouge (1 student), in Markham;
    • St. Michael the Archangel (1 staff); Tommy Douglas Secondary (1 student), Our Lady of Fatima (1 staff), in Woodbridge;
    • Maple High (1 student), Dr. Roberta Bondar (1 student) in Maple
    • Kleinburg P.S. (1 student) in Kleinburg
  • Surveillance closed for Sir Wilfrid Laurier (1 staff) and J. Addison (1 student), in Markham

*An outbreak is declared when 2 or more cases are confirmed within a 14-day period, with at least one case acquired in the school

**Schools with a laboratory-confirmed case that was not transmitted within the school 

Licensed child care facilities

  • 4 child care centre outbreaks*
  • 2 active outbreaks
    • Childventures Early Learning Academy, Aurora (1 staff)
    • Montessori School House, Maple (1 child, 1 staff)
  • 1 case child
  • 4 cases staff/visitors

*An outbreak is declared with one or more confirmed case in children or staff

Ontario (reported Thursday, Sept. 24 at 10:30 a.m.):

Cases in schools

  • 238 (+29) school-related cases
  • 110 (+10) students; 50 (+10) staff
  • 78 (+9) individuals not identified 
  • 198 (+20) of 4,828 schools with a case (4.10%)
  • 2 schools closed
    • Fellowes High School, Pembroke (1 student, 4 staff cases)
    • Monsignor Paul Baxter Catholic School, Ottawa (2 students, 2 staff)

Cases in child care centres and homes

  • 109 (+2) cases at child care centres and homes
  • 54 (+2) children
  • 55 staff
  • 36 (-1) of 5,111 child care centres with current cases (0.70%)
  • 10 (-1) child care centres currently closed (.20%)

York Region Public Health reminds parents and guardians to check your child daily for symptoms of COVID-19. For more information and resources, including how to protect yourself and others, visit york.ca/SafeAtSchool
 
You can download Canada’s COVID Alert in Apple and Google app stores or visit ontario.ca/covidalert

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A dazzling full 'harvest moon' is set to illuminate Vancouver skies next week – Vancouver Is Awesome

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While the weekend forecast calls for rain, Vancouver skies are expected to clear next week, which is just in time for the glorious full Harvest moon. 

Earlier this month, locals were treated to a full corn moon. Last year, September’s full moon was a full ‘harvest moon,’ which takes place in two years out of three. However, since October’s full moon falls closest to the fall equinox this year, it will carry the harvest title. 

According to the Old Farmer’s Almanac, “this full Moon name is attributed to Native Americans because it marked the time when corn was supposed to be harvested.”

The Harvest Moon gets was given its name because farmers needed its silvery light to harvest crops. It has since inspired a rather dreamy, beautiful song by Canadian icon Neil Young, too.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac also notes that Native peoples would give distinctive names to each reoccurring full moon to mark the change of seasons. As such, many of these names arose when Native Americans first interacted with colonialists. 

The October moon will be at its fullest in Vancouver on Thursday, Oct. 1 at 2:05 p.m. 

Stargazers should opt to travel as far away from city lights as possible in order to avoid light pollution that will obscure the clarity of heavenly bodies. While this works best in more remote places, anywhere that has a higher elevation will also provide more ideal viewing conditions.

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