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Spain adopts EU copyright law, paving way for Google News to return

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Spain has adopted a European Union copyright directive that allows third-party online news platforms to negotiate directly with content providers, the government said on Tuesday, setting the stage for Alphabet’s Google News to return to the country.

Google News, which links to third-party content, closed in Spain in late 2014 in response to legislation that forced it to pay a collective licensing fee to republish headlines or snippets of news.

The EU legislation, which must be adopted by all member states, requires platforms such as Google, Facebook and others to share revenue with publishers but it also removes the collective fee and allows them to reach individual or group agreements with publishers.

Google said it wanted to bring its news services back to Spain but would closely analyse the law before making any firm commitment.

“Based on the initial information… conditions look promising for the potential launch of Google News in Spain. However, we will need to see the final law before making any formal announcements,” a spokesperson said in an email.

Spain’s Culture Ministry said the new law brought national copyright legislation into step with the digital environment and would help artists and creators to receive fair remuneration for their work.

Arsenio Escolar, chairman of the CLABE publishers association, which groups around 1,000 news outlets including leading digital brands such as El Espanol and Eldiario.es, said he was pleased with the new legislation.

“We are satisfied because media publishers have regained the reins of the management of our rights, hijacked a few years ago by a law that we at CLABE have always considered unjust and harmful,” he said in an email to associates.

Reuters reported in February that some publishers represented by the AMI media association, which represents mainly the old guard of traditional media, were in favour of maintaining the old system.

AMI declined to comment on Tuesday.

(Reporting by Nathan Allen and Emma Pinedo; Editing by Susan Fenton and Gareth Jones)

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Twitter is testing a new way to let you add content warnings to posts – The Verge

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Twitter is piloting a new feature that will let users add specific content warnings to individual photos and videos sent out in tweets. The platform noted that the feature would be available to “some” users during the test.

Although Twitter currently has a way to add content warnings to tweets, the only way to do it is to add the warning to all your tweets. In other words, every photo or video you post will have a content warning, regardless of whether it contains sensitive material or not. The new feature it’s testing lets you add the warning to single tweets and apply specific categories to that warning.

As shown in the video that Twitter posted, it appears that when you’re editing an image or video, tapping the flag icon on the bottom right corner of the toolbar lets you add a content warning. The next screen lets you categorize the warning, with choices including “nudity,” “violence,” or “sensitive.” Once you post the tweet, the image or video will appear blurred out, and it’s overlaid with a content warning that explains why you flagged it. Users can click through the warning if they want to view the content.

If you fail to flag content when you post sensitive material, Twitter will — as it has already been doing — rely on user reports to decide whether or not your content should have a warning. In addition to its content warning experiment, Twitter announced yesterday that it’s trying out a “human-first” way to handle the reporting process. Instead of asking the user what rules the tweet is breaking, it will give the user the chance to describe what exactly happened, and based on that response, it will determine a specific violation.

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iOS 15.2 will help you spot third-party iPhone parts – Yahoo Canada Finance

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Apple’s seeming about-face on repairability will soon help you spot less-than-honest iPhone repair shops and part sellers. As Gizmodo notes, Apple has revealed iOS 15.2’s settings will include a “parts and service history” section (under General > About) that indicates not only whether the battery, camera and display have been replaced, but will indicate whether or not they’re officially sanctioned Apple parts. If a component is listed as an “unknown part,” it’s either unofficial, an already-used part from another iPhone or malfunctioning.

Just how much you’ll learn depends on your iPhone model. Anyone using an iPhone XR, XS or second-generation iPhone SE can only tell if the battery has been replaced. You’ll need an iPhone 11 or newer to also find out if there’s a display swap, and an iPhone 12 or later to know if the camera has been replaced. Apple stressed that these alerts won’t prevent you from using your device — you’re fine if you’re comfortable using unofficial parts and losing warranty coverage.

iOS 15.2 currently exists as a release candidate for developers, suggesting the finished version will be available relatively soon. It’s not yet clear if iPad owners will see a corresponding part history feature at some point.

The “unknown part” label might not thrill advocates for third-party component options. Apple clearly wants you to use official parts, and that means either taking it in for authorized service or (in 2022) buying parts from Apple. This might help you catch shops lying about the quality of their parts, though, and could be useful if you repair an iPhone yourself and want to be sure your fixes went smoothly.

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iOS 15.2 will help you spot third-party iPhone parts – Engadget

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Apple’s seeming about-face on repairability will soon help you spot less-than-honest iPhone repair shops and part sellers. As Gizmodo notes, Apple has revealed iOS 15.2’s settings will include a “parts and service history” section (under General > About) that indicates not only whether the battery, camera and display have been replaced, but will indicate whether or not they’re officially sanctioned Apple parts. If a component is listed as an “unknown part,” it’s either unofficial, an already-used part from another iPhone or malfunctioning.

Just how much you’ll learn depends on your iPhone model. Anyone using an iPhone XR, XS or second-generation iPhone SE can only tell if the battery has been replaced. You’ll need an iPhone 11 or newer to also find out if there’s a display swap, and an iPhone 12 or later to know if the camera has been replaced. Apple stressed that these alerts won’t prevent you from using your device — you’re fine if you’re comfortable using unofficial parts and losing warranty coverage.

iOS 15.2 currently exists as a release candidate for developers, suggesting the finished version will be available relatively soon. It’s not yet clear if iPad owners will see a corresponding part history feature at some point.

The “unknown part” label might not thrill advocates for third-party component options. Apple clearly wants you to use official parts, and that means either taking it in for authorized service or (in 2022) buying parts from Apple. This might help you catch shops lying about the quality of their parts, though, and could be useful if you repair an iPhone yourself and want to be sure your fixes went smoothly.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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