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Statistics Canada to detail October inflation reading – BNN

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Inflation in Canada unexpectedly picked up in October, partly on the back of rising home ownership costs.

Annual inflation accelerated to 0.7 per cent, from 0.5 per cent in September, Statistics Canada reported Wednesday in Ottawa. That exceeded the 0.4 per cent anticipated by economists in a Bloomberg survey. An index of replacement costs for homeowners rose by the most in 30 years last month, the agency said.

Even with the increase, price pressures remain muted as the nation grapples with the aftermath of the pandemic and renewed restrictions. The Bank of Canada predicts persistent slack in the economy and labor market will keep inflation below its two per cent target until at least 2023, allowing policy makers to keep interest rates historically low for the foreseeable future.

“October marks a mild high-side surprise for Canadian inflation,” Doug Porter, chief economist at the Bank of Montreal, said in a report to investors. “But the big picture is that inflation remains below one per cent, and probably isn’t going far with the economy about to face some further near-term challenges amid renewed restrictions.”

The acceleration narrows gap between Canada and inflation in the U.S., which has been hovering around one per cent.

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The homeowners’ index, derived from the price of new homes, rose 1.4 per cent, the largest monthly increase since June 1991, the agency said.

On a monthly basis, prices rose 0.4 per cent, compared with a 0.2 per cent median forecast in the Bloomberg survey. Food and shelter costs were the main upward contributors.

Core inflation measures — often seen as a better gauge of underlying price pressures — ticked up to an average of 1.77 per cent in October, the highest reading since February, from 1.7 per cent in September. Economists were forecasting core inflation at 1.73 per cent.

–With assistance from Erik Hertzberg.

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Former B.C. resident participating in AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine trial – Global News

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A former Vancouver resident is sharing his first-hand experience as one of the thousands of people who’ve agreed to participate in COVID-19 vaccine trials around the world.

Peter Wearing, who now lives in Arizona, is participating in the Stage 3 trial for the Oxford University-AstraZeneca vaccine.

The U.K.-based drug maker’s vaccine is seen as an important part of the vaccine solution, as it does not need to be transported at supercooled temperatures, and is being offered at a fraction of the price of its rivals.

Read more:
AstraZeneca releases coronavirus vaccine data. Here’s what Canadians should know

Both elements make it particularly promising for the developing world.

“I felt that I was healthy and I’ve had vaccines in the past and never had adverse reactions, so I felt that I’ll do my part,” Wearing told Global News.

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Canadian in charge of Moderna’s international vaccine manufacturing


Canadian in charge of Moderna’s international vaccine manufacturing

“My first visit I signed lots of paperwork, they took four vials of blood, I had a physical from a doctor.”

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He was then given two shots, two months apart — the second just two days ago. Wearing isn’t sure if he’s getting the actual vaccine, or is in a control group getting a placebo.

He said some people do get reactions typical of a flu vaccine, such as rashes or fevers, but he did not.

Read more:
AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine manufacturing error raises questions

“You don’t even really feel it going in, it’s that fine of a needle. The next day your muscle is a bit tender,” he said.

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Oxford and AstraZeneca reported in November that their vaccine appeared to be 62 per cent effective in people who received two doses, and 90 per cent effective when volunteers were given a half dose followed by a full dose.


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Federal government, provinces and Canadian Armed Forces ramp up COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan


Federal government, provinces and Canadian Armed Forces ramp up COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan

It later emerged that they’d discovered the half-dose advantage due to a manufacturing error that saw some people get a lower dose unintentionally. The company may conduct a future clinical trial specifically around the half-then-full dose program.

Wearing said it was important for him to participate because he still remembers an era when children commonly got polio. Vaccine development was critical to eradicating that disease.

“I have a lot of friends that are anti-vaxxers. I mean, they’re pretty serious about it, they’ve even challenged me on this,” he said.

“About five years ago I took the time to read what they said is their research, and then I read the counter-research. I’m a science guy, I like science, and in the end I came down on the side of traditional science.”

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Wearing said he’s given a two-year commitment to the project, and doctors will continue to take blood samples to test Wearing for antibodies to the virus.

Read more:
B.C. reports 711 new COVID-19 cases, 11 deaths

But he’s also been told that if he is, in fact, in the placebo group he will be given the actual vaccine if and when it wins approval in the U.S.

“The fact that this is coming out so fast, less than a year, is really exciting,” he said.

Canada has preordered 20 million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine, but it is unclear when it could win regulatory approval.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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'People should not go out' — Pandemic hitting Windsor-Essex harder than ever, top doc says – Windsor Star

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Article content continued

Roughly 1,000 of those cases were reported since Nov. 1

WINDSOR, ON. Friday, Dec. 4, 2020 -- This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows the breakdown of COVID-19 exposure types in the region as of Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. (VIA THE WECHU / WINDSOR STAR)
This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows the breakdown of COVID-19 exposure types in the region as of Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. Photo by Via the WECHU /Windsor Star

Approximately 25 per cent of recent cases have no epidemiological link, Ahmed said, meaning those individuals do not have a known exposure source, like a household contact with COVID-19 or exposure through a known workplace outbreak. In other words, a quarter of the region’s cases are being attributed to community spread.

The other most common infection source is household contact.

“When someone is infected, they are potentially infecting pretty much everyone else in their house,” Ahmed said. “Maybe, yes, you are healthy. Maybe you can recover from the virus, but some people cannot…. It’s something to be mindful of in terms of our responsibility in our activities when we are not at home.”

WINDSOR, ON. Friday, Dec. 4, 2020 -- This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows the region's rate of COVID-19 infection is roughly 73 cases per 100,000 population as of Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. (VIA THE WECHU / WINDSOR STAR)
This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows the region’s rate of COVID-19 infection is roughly 73 cases per 100,000 population as of Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. Photo by Via the WECHU /Windsor Star

The case rate for Windsor-Essex is currently 73 per 100,000 population, far exceeding the 40 case threshold that landed the region in the “red zone” with tightened restrictions on social gatherings, among other things.

Wastewater COVID-19 surveillance being performed by a team of University of Windsor researchers shows the prevalence of virus indicators in wastewater — shed by residents in fecal matter — is “clearly surpassing the active cases, so in the next couple of weeks we may see more cases,” Ahmed said.

WINDSOR, ON. Friday, Dec. 4, 2020 -- This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows wastewater data collected by a team of University of Windsor researchers looking at the presence of COVID-19 indicators in the region's fecal matter on Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. (VIA THE WECHU / WINDSOR STAR)
This graph from the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit shows wastewater data collected by a team of University of Windsor researchers looking at the presence of COVID-19 indicators in the region’s fecal matter on Friday, Dec. 4, 2020. Photo by Via the WECHU /Windsor Star

Last week, approximately 6,500 COVID-19 tests were completed in Windsor-Essex, with about four per cent of those tests coming back positive.

To deal with the increased demand for testing, Erie Shores HealthCare is expanding its testing capacity and adding 50 additional appointments to its schedule, Ahmed said. That announcement comes one day after the top public health doctor expressed his concern over a days-long wait for testing appointments in the region.

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How the Wealthy Could Start a Black Market for Vaccines – Inside Edition

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  1. How the Wealthy Could Start a Black Market for Vaccines  Inside Edition
  2. Facebook to remove COVID-19 vaccine-related misinformation  CTV News
  3. How many people need to be vaccinated for a return to normal?  Quartz
  4. Belgium’s only dry ice manufacturer overloaded | Corona vaccine | COVID-19 | World News  WION
  5. Hackers target groups in COVID-19 vaccine distribution, says IBM  Reuters
  6. View Full coverage on Google News



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