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Stock market live updates: Dow slides 900, VIX jumps above 30, reopening stocks lead losses – CNBC

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Dow closes down more than 600 points

The market indexes finished a dreary Monday off of session lows but still down sharply. The Dow lost 650 points, while the S&P 500 fell 1.9%. The Nasdaq Composite was the relative outperformer but still sank 1.6%. — Jesse Pound

Pelosi finishes call with Mnuchin but ‘progress depends on’ McConnell

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s spokesman said on Twitter that the Democratic leader remains “optimistic” about a pre-election deal after Monday’s phone call with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. However, spokesman Drew Hammill said that Democrats are still waiting on the White House to accept its language around Covid-19 testing and that “our progress depends on Leader McConnell agreeing to bipartisan, comprehensive legislation.” — Jesse Pound

Market trimming losses in final hour

Stocks have eased back from their session lows as the end of the session approaches. The Dow last traded down 690 points, while the S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite were down 2% and 1.8%, respectively. — Jesse Pound

Volatility index climbs above 33

The Cboe Volatility Index extended its gain for the session to nearly 6 points and traded above the 33.4 level. The measure commonly known as the “fear gauge” is on track for its highest close since Sept. 3. If it closes above 33.6 it will the highest reading since June. — Jesse Pound

Final hour of trading: Stocks plunge to start the week

The major averages were sharply lower with an hour left in the trading session amid concerns over a spike in coronavirus cases and stalled stimulus talks. The Dow dropped 735 points, or 2.6%. The S&P 500 slid 2.1% and the Nasdaq Composite pulled back 1.9%. —Fred Imbert

Bernstein says no update from Pfizer on vaccine is potentially worrying

Pfizer management previously said that they expected to have an update on the company’s Covid-19 vaccine in October. But the month is now nearing its end and the company still hasn’t provided additional information, which Bernstein said could potentially be worrying. “Some investors have begun to ponder if this delay means the first interim analysis has missed, and, if so, what this means for the likely efficacy of the vaccine,” the firm said in a note to clients.

Pfizer, which reports earnings on Tuesday before the opening bell, is developing its vaccine candidate in partnership with BioNTech. — Pippa Stevens

S&P 500 still well above next support level, BTIG says

The S&P 500 was still trading about 5% above its next support level despite Monday’s sell-off, according to a note from BTIG’s Julian Emanuel and Michael Chu.

“The market is likely to drift lower near term (first SPX support at 3,209) in the face of Stimulus disappointment … Virus resurgence … and intensifying Election uncertainty,” the strategists said in a note Monday morning. — Jesse Pound

The election could be closer than investors think, strategist says

Wall Street may have been warming up to the idea of so-called Blue Wave as former President Joe Biden holds a sizeable lead in the national polls. However, Aegon Asset Management’s Frank Rybinski thinks investors should brace themselves for a very close contest.

“A lot of the local races are a lot closer” than the national polls, said Rybinski, the firm’s chief macro strategist. He also noted that a recent Gallup poll found that 56% of Americans thought they were better off today than they were four years ago.

“That’s the first reading [on that question] above 50% that we’ve had going back like 40 years,” he said. “If [former House Speaker] Tip O’Neill was right and all politics are local, you don’t get more local than  your own household finances. That tells me this is going to be a much tighter race than the national polls suggest.” —Fred Imbert

Longer term outlook ‘keeps me optimistic,’ Lindsey Bell says

Ally Invest Chief Investment Strategist Lindsey Bell pointed to rising Covid-19 cases and the sagging hopes for a stimulus deal as reasons for Monday’s sell-off. Still, she said the outlook for next year and beyond served as motivation for investors to hold firm.

“Put it all together, and the setting feels eerily familiar. I’m keeping my eye on 2021 projections and the longer-term outlook. That keeps me optimistic about staying invested,” Bell said. — Jesse Pound

Investors should buy this dip, UBS advisor says

Teresa Jacobsen, managing director at UBS Wealth Management, said she thinks investors should buy during Monday’s market sell-off despite uncertainties around stimulus and the coronavirus pandemic.

“On a day like today where you’re seeing volatility, this is giving investors a chance to build positions, and we’re encouraging clients to use that volatility do so,” Jacobsen said.

Jacobsen said there was the potential for a more dramatic sell-off in the short term but pointed to a strong earnings season so far and progress on vaccines as reasons for this to not be a protracted downturn.

“I think there a lot of positives over the longer term for investors,” she said. — Jesse Pound

Pelosi says two sides still differ on testing plan

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a letter to Democratic lawmakers that she and the White House still disagree about health care portions of an additional stimulus bill, including a testing strategy for the coronavirus.

“In all of our legislation, we have stressed the importance of testing, but the Administration has never followed through. The Republicans’ continued surrender to the virus – particularly amid the recent wave of cases – is official malfeasance,” Pelosi said. “We must come to agreement as soon as possible. But we cannot accept the Administration’s refusal to crush the virus, honor our heroes or put money in the pockets of the American people,” she said. — Jesse Pound

Monday’s double whammy serves as a ‘harsh reminder,’ strategist says

The sharp sell-off on Monday, triggered by a record surge in new coronavirus cases and waning hopes for a stimulus deal before the election, served as a reminder that we are not out of the woods yet in terms of the economic recovery, according to Ryan Detrick, chief market strategist for LPL. “The double whammy of a stalled stimulus bill and new highs in cases is a harsh reminder of the many worries that are still out there,” Detrick said. “Most of the recent economic data has been strong, but when you see parts of Europe going back to rolling shutdowns, it reminds us this fight is still far from over.” The Dow dropped 950 points at its session low in afternoon trading, and the S&P 500 last traded 2.7% lower.— Yun Li

Here are some of the biggest movers midday

  • Dunkin’ Brands — Dunkin’ shares spiked after the company said it was in early talks about potentially being acquired by Inspire Brands.
  • Hasbro — Shares of the toy maker fell sharply despite the company posting better-than-expected results for the previous quarter.
  • Lordstown Motors — The Ohio-based electric vehicle maker saw its stock briefly jump in the company’s public-market debut. The stock began trading on Monday after a reverse merger with DiamondPeak Holdings, a SPAC.

Click here to read more. —Fred Imbert

Markets at midday: Stocks drop, Dow heads for worst day since September

The major averages were sharply lower on Monday as concerns over the growing number of U.S. coronavirus cases and a lack of fiscal stimulus dented market sentiment. The Dow traded more than 700 points lower, or 2.6%, and was headed for its biggest one-day drop since Sept. 3. The S&P 500 slid 2.1% and was on pace for it worst day since Sept. 23. The Nasdaq Composite dropped 1.7%. —Fred Imbert

Volatily Index jumps above 30

The Cboe Volatility Index jumped about 3.7 points to trade above 31.20 on Monday morning. The index, often called Wall Street’s “fear gauge,” hasn’t closed above 30 since Sept. 8. The measure is still well below where it was during the coronavirus-sparked sell-off in March. — Jesse Pound

Stock sell-off accelerates

Stocks continued their downward march throughout morning trading. At the low, the Dow fell 714 points for a loss of 2.52%. The S&P 500 declined 2.14% at its low, while the Nasdaq Composite dipped 1.73%. — Pippa Stevens

Dow on pace to break below its 50-day moving average

Monday’s sell-off has put the Dow Jones Industrial Average on pace to close below its 50-day moving average level of 28,021.68 for the first time since Sept. 29. The moving average is a widely watched momentum indicator. The 30-stock average has not closed below 28,000 since Oct. 6 when the Dow closed at 27,772.76.

The S&P 500 fell 1.4% in morning trading to around 3,418, just above its 50-day moving average level of 3,409.08. — Gina Francolla, Yun Li

Airlines, cruise line operators lead declines

Amid a surge in Covid-19 cases and stalled stimulus talks, airlines and cruise line operators led stocks lower on Monday. The two groups are especially sensitive to an uptick in coronavirus cases.

United Airlines dropped 4.6%, while Delta, American, Alaska Air and JetBlue were all down more than 3%.

Norwegian Cruise Line, Royal Caribbean and Carnival all declined more than 7%. — Pippa Stevens

BlackRock downgrades Treasuries ahead of election

BlackRock on Monday downgraded U.S. Treasuries and upgraded their inflation-linked peers ahead of the election on a growing likelihood of significant fiscal expansion, which could trigger a rise in price pressures. “Markets are increasingly reflecting a unified Democratic government outcome that may lead to a significant fiscal expansion,” Mike Pyle, BlackRock’s global chief investment strategist said in a note. “This electoral outcome would bring forward the market pricing of the higher inflation regime that we were already reflecting in our strategic asset views.” The benchmark 10-year yield, which moves opposite prices, hit a four-month high of 0.84% last week. — Yun Li

Netflix, Amazon in the green

Amid a broad sell-off on Monday, Netflix and Amazon were among the stocks trading in the green. The two tech companies are seen as beneficiaries of stay-at-home trends, and as Covid-19 cases surge across the U.S. and the world, investors wagered they could be set to accelerate gains. Each stock was about 1.5% higher during early trading. — Pippa Stevens

Cramer says the market should focus on Dunkin’ bid, not poor SAP results

CNBC’s Jim Cramer shrugged off the steep slide in SAP shares after the software company’s disappointing earnings report, saying he believes its quarterly results should not guide broader investor behavior.

“I thought that the market should have focused on Dunkin’ Donuts, because here has been a red-hot stock, doing incredibly well, and then gets a bid anyway,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.” “If we just focus on Dunkin’, what does it say about so many of our stocks that have actually been doing well?”

He also noted a positive analyst note on Calvin Klein-owner PVH, as well as an upgrade for the stock of Kontoor Brands, which owns the Wrangler brand. “The whole process of being casual at home, another positive thesis, so I’m seeing too much good, not enough bad, to let SAP color this morning,” he said. – Kevin Stankiewicz 

Stocks decline as stimulus talks stall

Stocks dropped out of the gate on Monday as stimulus talks drag on. The Dow Jones Industrial Average declined 303 points for a loss of 1%, while the S&P 500 shed 0.96%. The Nasdaq Composite opened 0.82% lower. A surge in Covid-19 cases across the country also weighed on sentiment. — Pippa Stevens

SAP plunges 20% as company sends a warning on Covid impact on business

As Covid-19 cases surge, a warning from Europe’s biggest software company that businesses are holding back on spending added to the chill in markets Monday morning.

SAP cut its earnings and revenues forecast for 2020, noting that its customers are spending less, as virus cases surge in Europe. “Lockdowns have been reintroduced in some regions, recovery is uneven and companies are facing more business uncertainty,” SAP said.

SAP also said it was shifting more of its efforts to cloud computing, a move that is expected to depress its margins. JPMorgan cut its rating on the company to neutral from overweight.

SAP shares were down 20% Monday, wiping about $30 billion off its valuation in its worst trading day in 12 years. — Patti Domm

Here are Monday’s biggest analyst calls of the day: Apple, Palantir, Winnebago, Lululemon & more

  • Evercore ISI added Apple to the tactical outperform list.
  • JPMorgan initiated Zscaler as overweight.
  • Bank of America upgraded Kontoor Brands to buy from neutral.
  • Raymond James upgraded D.R. Horton and Toll Brothers to outperform from market perform.
  • Atlantic Equities reinstated Apple as overweight.
  • JPMorgan added Lululemon to the focus list.
  • Morgan Stanley initiated Palantir as overweight.
  • Citi upgraded Winnebago to buy from neutral.

Pro subscribers can read more here.Michael Bloom

Covid cases spike over the weekend

Coronavirus cases are spiking in the U.S. and abroad, raising concerns about the pandemic into the winter months. The U.S. reported 83,757 new Covid-19 cases on Friday, passing the last record of roughly 77,300 cases seen in mid-July, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. On Saturday, the U.S. reported another 83,718 new coronavirus cases.

The U.S. on Sunday set a new daily record of 68,767 cases on a seven-day average, according to a CNBC analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University. 

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows said the U.S. is not going to control the coronavirus pandemic on Sunday. “We’re not going to control the pandemic,” Meadows told CNN. “We are going to control the fact that we get vaccines, therapeutics and other mitigations.”

Cases are also spiking around the world, with Italy, France and Spain seeing outbreaks worsen. Spain ordered a nationwide curfew on Sunday and Italy tightened restrictions over the weekend.

Global cases are over 43 million and U.S. cases are more than 8.6 million. — Maggie Fitzgerald

AstraZeneca says its coronavirus vaccine produces immune response

Shares of AstraZeneca rose 0.8% in the premarket after the company said its coronavirus vaccine candidate triggered an immune response among adults.

“It is encouraging to see immunogenicity responses were similar between older and younger adults and that reactogenicity was lower in older adults, where the COVID-19 disease severity is higher,” an AstraZeneca spokesman told CNBC via email. “The results further build the body of evidence for the safety and immunogenicity of AZD1222.” —Fred Imbert, Sam Meredith

Ant Group on track for largest IPO on record

China-based Ant Group will raise $34.5 billion in its dual initial public offering, making it the biggest listing of all time. The financial technology giant said it will split its stock issuance across Shanghai and Hong Kong, issuing 1.67 billion shares in each location. Based on where the company priced the new shares, Ant Group’s valuation stands at $313.37 billion.

The prior largest IPO on record was Saudi Aramco, which raised just over $29 billion in its IPO. — Arjun Kharpal, Pippa Stevens

Dunkin jumps after announcing potential merger

Shares of Dunkin’ Brands surged 17% in premarket trading after the company said in a statement that it is exploring a deal with Inspire Brands that would take the Dunkin’ Donuts parent private. Dunkin’ has already reclaimed its pre-pandemic highs. — Jesse Pound

Stimulus hopes dwindle

With the election less than two weeks away, hopes are dwindling that an agreement on additional stimulus measures will be reached by Nov. 3. Over the weekend White House chief of staff Mark Meadows and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused each other of moving the goalposts on stimulus talks in separate interviews with CNN. — Pippa Stevens

Dow futures drop more than 200 points

U.S. stock futures came under pressure during early trading on Monday as Covid-19 cases across the country surge. Futures contracts tied to the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 264 points, indicating a more than 300-point drop at the opening bell. S&P 500 futures shed 0.88%, while Nasdaq 100 futures declined 0.7%.

The U.S. reported more than 83,000 new Covid-19 cases on both Friday and Saturday, topping the previous high of 77,300 new cases in July, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Amid the spike, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows said in a CNN interview that “We’re not going to control the pandemic. … We are going to control the fact that we get vaccines, therapeutics and other mitigations.”

The major averages are coming off a week of losses. The Dow and S&P each snapped a three-week winning streak, while the Nasdaq posted its first down week in five. — Pippa Stevens

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Conservatives press Trudeau government over COVID-19 vaccine after U.K. approval – News 1130

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OTTAWA – The Trudeau government is facing increasing pressure to give a clear timeline for COVID-19 vaccine distribution, after news the U.K. approved on Wednesday the Pfizer candidate for emergency use.

The U.K. is the first western country to approve a COVID-19 vaccine, a move that has prompted the federal opposition to once again ask why Canada didn’t move faster.

A statement from Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole says our allies have plans to get vaccines to their people in days or weeks, and yet the prime minister has no timeline and no plan.

“The U.K. has approved Pfizer’s vaccine and are ready to begin vaccinating people next week, yet Canadians still have no idea when they’ll get vaccines,” he says. “Our allies around the world have plans to get vaccines to their people while Prime Minister Trudeau has no timeline, no plan for distribution, and no plan on who will get vaccines first. Canadians deserve certainty.”

His point is being echoed by Tory MPs, with Marilyn Gladu saying, “It’s too bad that the Liberals’ lack of planning has resulted in Canadians going to be delayed months.”

Conservative MP Michael Barrett claims Canada didn’t act fast enough to ensure we had access to immunizations when our allies do.

“They’re going to start vaccinating their population. We’re seeing that by the end of the first quarter, the promise from the Liberals is that we’ll have six-million doses, which is about three-million vaccinations,” he says.

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The latest on the coronavirus outbreak for Dec. 2 – CBC.ca

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  • Coronavirus tracker: Follow the spread of COVID-19 as case numbers remain high in most of Canada.
  • Quebec hospitalization rates have doctors there concerned that allowing Christmas gatherings could lead to untenable January scenario.
  • Sask. corrections minister under fire because of COVID-19 outbreak at Saskatoon jail. .
  • U.S. advisory panel makes near-unanimous recommendations on priority groups to first receive a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Read more: Neskantaga First Nation residents deal with evacuation, pandemic stressors because of water crisis; some of Canada’s biggest retailers say Ontario lockdown rules ‘might actually be making things worse.’

Bob Underhill, 84, and his wife Patricia, 82, who is suffering from Alzheimer’s, kiss through a face mask as they are allowed to resume visits with physical contact in London, U.K. at The Chiswick Nursing Centre, which introduced a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test with results ready in 30 minutes. (Kevin Coombs/Reuters)

Vaccine public opinion polling reflects polarization seen throughout pandemic

Since attention has turned to vaccines and what appears to be the likelihood in the near future that at least one will be authorized as safe to use for most Canadians, the Conservatives in Ottawa have focused their attacks on the federal government’s plan to acquire and distribute the doses, writes CBC’s Éric Grenier.

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole has claimed that Canada will be “near the back of the line” for vaccines because of the country’s dependence on companies with production facilities outside the country. But this week’s Léger poll suggests a minority of Canadians share O’Toole’s concern — while 37 per cent of Canadians are worried Canada might not get the vaccine at the same time as the United States and the United Kingdom, 48 per cent said they are “not that concerned” and feel “a few months won’t make much of a difference.”

The Léger poll suggests Conservative voters are the ones most likely to be concerned about delays — and the ones least likely to say they would take the first vaccine made available to the public. According to Léger, about half of Conservative voters believe that the current federal government is withholding information about vaccines, with only 15 per cent of Liberal voters holding a similar view.

Trust in a vaccine could have an impact on Canadians’ willingness to get in line, and it appears to be taking on a partisan hue, writes Grenier.

On average, recent polls conducted by Abacus, Angus Reid and Léger suggest only 34 per cent of Canadians would get immunized as soon as possible, while 41 per cent said they would wait a little before getting the needle. Between 11 and 15 per cent of those polled said they would not get vaccinated at all.

In the Reid, Abacus and Léger surveys, an average of just 27 per cent of Conservative voters said they would get vaccinated as soon as possible, compared to 43 per cent of Liberals and 39 per cent of New Democrats.

Click below to watch more videos from CBC News

As Canada prepares to distribute millions of doses of COVID-19 vaccines in January, Chair of the National Advisory Committee on Immunization Dr. Caroline Quach-Thanh and David Levine, who managed the H1N1 vaccine rollout for Montreal, say this vaccination campaign won’t be without challenges. 3:56

IN BRIEF

Quebec hospitals filling up, doctors concerned Christmas gatherings could push them over the edge

Quebec hospitals usually see a rise in visits to the emergency room in early January, but as of Wednesday morning, nearly one-third of the province’s emergency rooms are operating at full capacity or greater.

For now, the province plans to allow Quebec residents up to two gatherings between Dec. 24 and Dec. 27, with a maximum of 10 people in attendance and with no limit on the number of households those people would come from.

Dr. Vincent Bouchard-Dechêne, an internal medicine specialist at Notre-Dâme Hospital in Montreal, doesn’t see how hospitals can deal with an increase in COVID-19 patients after the holidays while still providing service to people with other ailments.

“To limit gatherings during Christmastime would be the best gift we could give ourselves,” said Bouchard-Dechêne.

Premier François Legault has said he will make a final call on holiday gathering guidelines by Dec. 11, but Dr. Matthew Oughton, a physician with the Jewish General Hospital’s infectious diseases division, is among those questioning that timeline.

The characteristics of COVID-19, including the time it takes for its symptoms to appear, make it difficult for trends to change much between now and Dec. 11, some doctors say.

“That’s really at the fine cutting edge of where anything that you would do today, you’d really see changes reflected in the numbers by Dec. 11,” said Oughton.

Read more about what’s happening in Quebec 

Sask. minister under fire over COVID-19 outbreak at jail

Some NDP members of the legislature are calling on Saskatchewan’s corrections minister to resign amid an outbreak at the Saskatoon Correctional Centre.

Corrections and Policing Minister Christine Tell says the government is doing all it can to protect the inmates and staff at the jail, but has offered little in the way of specifics. In the past 10 days, the number of staff and inmates testing positive for COVID-19 at the centre has gone from none to 142.

“Why it came into the facility with all the precautions, I can’t answer that,” said Tell.

Advocacy groups are calling for the targeted release of inmates from the centre. Earlier this year, the province’s Public Prosecutions agency moved to reduce the numbers in the province’s jails, instructing prosecutors to review all new arrests with an eye to keeping non-violent accused out of jail.

The order was a response to fears about the coronavirus getting into the jail system, which has been a problem during the pandemic in a number of North American prisons and jails. A CBC News analysis earlier in the year found infection rates among those Canadians imprisoned or jailed were up to nine times higher than in the general population.

According to the government, decisions about releasing inmates at the Saskatoon facility who don’t pose a community risk would be made by Public Prosecutions.

Tell said the jail has been taking precautions to slow the spread, including mandatory masking, no longer charging inmates for soap and banning visitors.

NDP MLA Nicole Sarauer said the province’s handling and response should cost Tell her position.

“This is a minister who shouldn’t be a minister anymore,” Sarauer said.

Read more about the situation in Saskatchewan 

U.S advisory panel sets out priority groups for 1st vaccinations

Health-care workers and nursing home residents should be at the front of the line when the first coronavirus vaccine shots become available in the U.S., an influential government advisory panel said this week in a near-unanimous verdict.

The U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted 13-1 to recommend to the Centers for Disease Control those groups — which comprise about 24 million Americans — get priority in the first days of any coming vaccination program, when doses are expected to be limited.

About three million people in the U.S. live in nursing homes, long-term chronic care hospitals and other long-term care facilities. Those patients and the staff members who care for them have accounted for six per cent of U.S. coronavirus cases and a staggering 39 per cent of deaths, CDC officials say.

The recommendations are not binding, but the panel dates back to 1964 and for decades its advice has been widely heeded by doctors. But one potential complication is that it will be governors and state officials who ultimately have final say on the prioritization of specific populations in their jurisdictions.

The panel will meet again at some point to recommend who should be next in line. Among the possibilities: teachers, police, firefighters and workers in other essential fields, such as food production and transportation, could be among those under consideration then.

In Canada, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization, or NACI, has released preliminary recommendations that prioritize the elderly and others at severe risk of illness, including health-care workers, front-line staff and those with lower access to health care, such as Indigenous populations.

Read more about the recommendations 

(CBC News)

Stay informed with the latest COVID-19 data.

THE SCIENCE

U.K. approves Pfizer coronavirus vaccine for emergency use

Britain’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, which licenses drugs in the United Kingdom, approved Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use on Wednesday.

While the U.K. has ordered 40 million doses of the Pfizer vaccine — enough for 20 million people — Conservative Health Minister Matt Hancock said the first shipment will be 800,000 doses and will arrive “within days” to the National Health Service.

China and Russia have offered different vaccinations to their citizens ahead of late-stage testing, but Britain is the first to sign off on a COVID-19 vaccine through a Western-style regulatory process.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is set to meet on Dec. 10 to review the Pfizer product. Pfizer’s vaccine is among seven that Canada has pre-ordered, and Health Canada’s chief medical adviser, Supriya Sharma, has said regulators here are expected to make decisions on timelines similar to those followed by the U.S.

Final testing must still be completed for the shots made by U.S.-based Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech, but results appear to be effective at preventing mild to severe COVID-19 disease, with no known serious side-effects so far.

The vaccine itself does come with challenges in terms of deployment. It must be stored and shipped at ultra-cold temperatures of around -70 C, unlike some of the other vaccine candidates, and it will be delivered with a saline solution for dilution purposes.

AND FINALLY…

Nova Scotia study to examine COVID-19 shaming

Motorists go through checkpoints on July 3 leaving the Confederation Bridge in Borden-Carleton, P.E.I., as part of Atlantic Canada’s travel bubble. While the region has generally not seen virus outbreaks as in other parts of the country, shaming of those who test positive occurs, says a Dalhousie professor. (Brian McInnis/The Canadian Press)

A Dalhousie University professor hopes that a study of shaming during the COVID-19 pandemic can be a start to breaking the historical cycle. International development studies professor Robert Huish is looking for people who have been the targets of pandemic shaming to tell their stories.

Huish is starting his study in Nova Scotia, but hopes to expand it across Atlantic Canada and eventually across the country.

“There is always someone who is shunned, someone who is shamed, someone who is made to feel marginalized, and that’s been an unfortunate consequence of quarantine for thousands of years, Huish told Island Morning host Mitch Cormier.

The expected arrival of a vaccine, presented as a “light at the end of the tunnel” scenario, could paradoxically be a difficult time, Huish said. In the beginning there will not be enough vaccine for everyone, and the federal and provincial governments will prioritize groups to first be vaccinated. Many Canadians will have to physically distance and wear masks well into 2021.

“Allowing people to be vaccinated and then suddenly free of any of the ordinances that the rest of society is following, that could build huge resentment, stigmatization and all sorts of weird social complexities that we may not see coming,” he said.

Read more about the study here

Find out more about COVID-19

Still looking for more information on the pandemic? Read more about COVID-19’s impact on life in Canada, or reach out to us at covid@cbc.ca if you have any questions.

If you have symptoms of the illness caused by the coronavirus, here’s what to do in your part of the country.

For full coverage of how your province or territory is responding to COVID-19, visit your local CBC News site.

To get this newsletter daily as an email, subscribe here

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Watch live: Ontario Premier Doug Ford makes an announcement – CTV Toronto

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TORONTO —
Ontario Premier Doug Ford said he’s still pushing to “knock down” the 14-day quarantine for travellers returning into Canada from overseas.

Ford made the comment on Wednesday afternoon after being asked whether border restrictions between Canada and the United States should be tightened given the escalating number of COVID-19 cases in both countries. 

In response to the question, Ford said he still pushing to replace the quarantine with a rapid COVID-19 testing program, similar to what Alberta implemented earlier this year.

Under the plan, international travellers receive a COVID-19 test upon entering Canada before going into quarantine. If the test comes back negative, those travellers are allowed to leave quarantine but will have to take another test six or seven days after their initial arrival.

“We’re working with the federal government right now at Toronto Pearson to reduce the downtime once you come back,” Ford said. “You have to quarantine for 14-days, we want to knock that down.”

“I’m really pushing it because if you can land and you can get tested right away and then you get tested, I think it’s five to seven days later, and they both come out negative, you should be able to go on your way.”

Ford said he is expecting an answer later Wednesday afternoon on the status of the pilot project. 

Ford went on to say that he believes the federal government needs to “step it up” when it comes to travellers returning in to Canada and at the very least take people’s temperatures. 

“Don’t just let them walk off and hop in a taxi and away they go,” Ford said. 

He also said he believes that some people are not adhering the quarantine rules when arriving back in Canada. 

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