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Stock markets down again after big drop on Thursday – Business News – Castanet.net

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UPDATE: 9:10 a.m.

Canada’s main stock index plunged more than 300 points in late-morning trading, adding to its losses a day ago, while U.S. stock markets also sank again.

The S&P/TSX composite index fell 345.05 points to 16,103.84.

In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 530.25 points at 27,762.48. The S&P 500 index was down 86.38 points at 3,368.68, while the Nasdaq composite was down 426.87 points at 11,031.23.

The Canadian dollar traded for 76.23 cents US compared with 76.20 cents US on Thursday.

The October crude contract was down US$1.43 at US$39.94 per barrel and the October natural gas contract was down four cents at US$2.44 per mmBTU.

The December gold contract was down US$13.70 at US$1,924.10 an ounce and the December copper contract was up four cents at US$3.02 a pound.


UPDATE: 7:45 a.m.

Stocks are falling again on Wall Street in early trading Friday, adding to the market’s losses after its biggest sell-off since June.

The S&P 500 was down 1.2% after initially climbing 0.7% shortly after trading opened. Another slide in technology stocks, which led the selling a day earlier, outweighed gains in financial, industrial companies and elsewhere in the market. Declines in communications stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending also weighed on the market. The benchmark index remains on track for its first weekly loss after five weeks of gains.

Stocks fell after the Labor Department said that U.S. hiring slowed to 1.4 million last month, the fewest jobs since the pandemic began, even as the nation’s unemployment rate improved to 8.4% from 10.2%. The U.S. economy has recovered about half the 22 million jobs lost to the pandemic.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was down 189 points, or 0.6%, to 28,110 as of 10:20 a.m. Eastern time. It lost more than 800 points on Thursday. The technology-heavy Nasdaq was down 3% a day after a 5% skid.

Treasury yields headed higher, a sign that some investors were less pessimistic about the economy. The 10-year Treasury yield rose to 0.67%, up from 0.62% late Thursday.


ORIGINAL: 7:09 a.m.

Canada’s main stock index was up in early trading, helped by gains in the financial, industrial and metals and mining sectors.

The S&P/TSX composite index was up 32.21 points at 16,481.10.

Stocks opened higher on Wall Street Friday, a day after a big slump in technology companies pulled the market to its biggest drop since June. 

In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 199.92 points at 28,492.65. The S&P 500 index was up 9.08 points at 3,464.14, while the Nasdaq composite was down 38.72 points at 11,419.38.

Traders were encouraged to see a drop in the unemployment rate last month, even as hiring slowed. Treasury yields rose after the government’s monthly jobs report came out, a sign that investors are becoming less pessimistic about the economy.

The higher yields helped send bank stocks higher, since banks can lend money at higher rates once yields rise in the bond market.

European shares also opened higher on Friday and U.S. futures bounced back after a day of losses in Asia.

Germany’s DAX gained 0.4% to 13,101.39 and the CAC 40 in Paris jumped 0.8% to 5,048.18. Britain’s FTSE 100 climbed 0.4% to 5,874.37. U.S. shares looked set for a comeback, with the future for the S&P 500 up 0.3% and that for the Dow industrials 0.5% higher.

There was little going on in Asia to alter the markets’ downward trajectory after the U.S. benchmark S&P 500 gave up 3.5% on Thursday, its biggest loss in three months, and the Nasdaq fell 5% as high-flying technology companies took a tumble after months of spectacular gains.

There seemed to be no obvious trigger for the sell-off, with economic data coming in roughly where the market had expected and no companies issuing foreboding warnings. But the market felt due for a breather, analysts said.

“Altitude sickness?” asked Riki Ogawa of Mizuho Bank. “To be sure, the plunge after overly exuberant rallies of recent was in itself not counter-intuitive; but the precise motivation of, and triggers for, market moves remains an enigma.”

“While I don’t think its a healthy meltdown, getting rid of some of the short term speculator froth will offer up better levels for the Wall of Money to indulge as we know the Fed is not going anywhere soon,” Stephen Innes of AxiCorp said in a commentary.

The Nikkei 225 shed 1.1% to 23,205.43 while the Hang Seng in Hong Kong lost 1.3% to 24,095.45. Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 gave up 3.1% to 5,925.50 and the Shanghai Composite index slipped 0.9% to 3,355.37. South Korea’s Kospi lost 1.2% to 2,368.25.

Wall Street’s unloading of technology shares on Thursday ended with Apple plunging 8%. Amazon lost 4.6% and Facebook gave back 3.8%.

Even with Thursday’s losses, Apple is still up 64.7% for the year, and Amazon is up 82.3%. Zoom’s gain for the year is still a whopping 460.4%.

The gains have been based on rosy assumptions about the virus’s impact on the economy, as well as on prospects for Congress and the White House coming up with another economic relief package.

The Canadian dollar traded for 76.30 cents US this morning, compared with 76.20 cents US on Thursday.

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The latest on the coronavirus outbreak for Sept. 24 – CBC.ca

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A protester blows a bicycle horn outside the Knesset in Jerusalem on Thursday, after Israel moved to further tighten its second countrywide lockdown amid soaring coronavirus case numbers. (Maya Alleruzzo/Associated Press)

Public health officials call for tighter restrictions, warn COVID-19 could spiral out of control 

Infectious disease experts say Canadian health authorities must tighten restrictions again, or hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 will increase exponentially in the coming weeks. Canada reported 1,248 new cases Wednesday, and Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam has outlined projections that show new cases could climb to 5,000 daily by October if we continue on the current course.

“To date, we’re not moving fast enough to get ahead of this,” Dr. Michael Gardam, an infectious disease physician based at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto, told CBC News. “I think we’re being lulled into a false sense of security because of the low numbers of hospitalizations and deaths [relative to earlier in the pandemic]. But they will come in the next six weeks or so.”

He said asking people nicely to tighten their social circles is not going to be enough. Gardam said Canadians grew fatigued with the restrictions imposed on their social circles earlier in the year and won’t be eager to return to them unless pressed. “I think we’re going to have to be a lot more forceful,” he said. Right now, “people are playing fast and loose with bubbles all over the place.”

The actions taken in the next two weeks could change the trajectory of the pandemic in the months to come, said Laura Rosella, an epidemiologist and associate professor at the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public Health. “There’s a lot of things with this pandemic that we can’t control, but we might be able to control who we interact with, especially socially, and who’s in our bubble,” said Rosella. “I would encourage everyone to rethink what their bubbles are given the new situation.”

Getting a handle on this COVID-19 surge means returning to restrictions implemented earlier in the pandemic, said Dr. Samir Gupta, a clinician-scientist at St. Michael’s Hospital and an assistant professor in the department of medicine at the University of Toronto. Speaking with Heather Hiscox on CBC Morning Live Wednesday, Gupta said Canadians “need to start making similar sacrifices to the ones we made the first time around,” which was successful with flattening the curve in the spring.

Click below to watch more from The National

IN BRIEF

Ontario sees 409 new COVID-19 cases, rolls out $1B updated testing and contact-tracing plan 

Ontario reported an additional 409 cases of COVID-19 on Thursday, as Premier Doug Ford said his government will invest $1 billion to expand testing and contact-tracing capacity heading into flu season, including some $30 million to “prevent and manage outbreaks” in priority settings such as long-term care facilities, retirement homes and schools.

The province’s network of labs is currently facing a backlog of 53,840 test samples, the most since cases of the infection were first detected in January. During a media briefing, health officials said that publicly funded testing sites are moving away from offering tests to asymptomatic people. Instead, the province will return to a more targeted approach as hospitals, testing sites and labs have reported being overwhelmed by public demand for tests.

“We know that over the summer, when we opened up testing to anybody who wanted it, we did not find cases,” said Dr. Barbara Yaffe, Ontario’s associate chief medical officer of health. “Right now, we need to focus on people who are symptomatic, people who are contacts, people in outbreaks, or in very specific populations where we have designated that testing needs to occur. Your average person out there who is not exposed to a case … should not be going for testing. There’s no value. In fact, what we found is when there’s very little COVID in that group, what we end up with is false positives, which just complicates things even more.”

Testing of asymptomatic people will be limited to pharmacies, an initiative announced by Ford earlier this week. According to Matthew Anderson, president and CEO of Ontario Health, the province hopes to have capacity for up to 50,000 tests per day some time in October.

No one likes wearing a mask — but with COVID-19 cases rising, you should put it on more often than you think 

Experts are warning that at this point in the pandemic, when the benefits of mask-wearing are growing clear and COVID-19 cases are rising rapidly, Canadians should be donning their masks as much as possible.

“Keep wearing your mask, as much as you can, especially with people you don’t live with,” Toronto’s medical officer of health, Dr. Eileen de Villa, stressed on Monday. Multiple experts who spoke to CBC News this week say that means keeping a mask on in a variety of settings, even if local bylaws don’t mandate it.

Dr. Zain Chagla, an associate professor of medicine at McMaster University and an infectious disease consultant at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, said masks are helpful when staying a couple of metres apart is challenging — “even if you’re on the patio, until you have to eat and drink, and then putting it back on afterwards,” he said. “We just have to kind of get people to make it a reflex.”

Edmonton-based health policy expert Timothy Caulfield agreed that people should strive to wear a mask around anyone from outside their own household. “If it’s an indoor environment and you can’t get that good two-metre space all the time, think about wearing a mask — even if it’s family members,” said Caulfield, Canada Research Chair in health law and policy and research director of the Health Law Institute at the University of Alberta.

Liberals boost some COVID-19 benefits in new bill 

The federal government tabled legislation Thursday to provide what it’s calling a “safe bridge” for Canadians who are still experiencing lost income due to COVID-19. The proposed new suite of measures aims to transition people from the Canada emergency response benefit (CERB) to an employment insurance program with expanded eligibility or to one of three new recovery benefits. Bill C-2 also provides for a 10-day sick leave benefit — something the NDP had demanded.

During a news conference in Ottawa, Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough said the CERB was introduced quickly at a time when most of the economy was at a standstill. As the country moves into economic recovery mode, the government is better placed to deliver financial support in a more sophisticated way, she said. “I think we’ve created, in Bill C-2, a much more elegant balance between the need to not disincentivize work but also support people who, regardless of effort, still aren’t working or have significantly reduced hours,” she said.

Qualtrough said the past few months have exposed gaps in the EI system, which is why the government wants to modernize it to better reflect Canada’s current labour market. Measures in the legislation offer greater flexibility on the work hours required for the EI benefit, making it easier for people to qualify for a one-year period.

Stay informed with the latest COVID-19 data from Canada and around the world.

THE SCIENCE

Quebec’s early March break contributed to province’s spring woes, study suggests 

COVID-19 could have been carried to Quebec by as few as 247 people coming home from travelling, according to a new genome sequencing study conducted by the Institut national de santé publique du Québec and the McGill Genome Center. The study looked at the genome sequences of 734 COVID-19 samples in Quebec between mid-February and April 1 and compared them to over 21,000 other samples elsewhere in the world.

In Quebec, the first confirmed case of COVID-19 was traced back to as early as Feb. 25, according to the study, but it and other early cases were well contained and did not lead to sustained transmission. “It was a trickle at first,” said Jesse Shapiro, an associate professor in the department for human genetics and head of genome sciences at McGill, noting that it was easier to manage the few cases of COVID-19 in the province at that time.

That trickle turned into a rush of new arrivals after the province’s early spring break, with hundreds of travellers returning to Quebec after travelling abroad. The study, which has not been peer reviewed, suggests what many already suspected: the early break, which began Feb. 29, was a key factor in the spread of the virus before the lockdown in mid-March.

According to the study, nearly one-third of the infections in Quebec came through Europe, with 12 per cent coming from France. Just under 31 per cent of the virus samples studied came from the Caribbean and Latin America, and around 24 per cent came from the United States. Few transmissions appeared to come from Asia.

AND FINALLY…

Disney postpones Black Widow, West Side Story

From left, president of Marvel Studios Kevin Feige, Scarlett Johansson, David Harbour, Florence Pugh, O-T Fagbenle, director Cate Shortland and Rachel Weisz of Marvel Studios’ Black Widow stand on stage at the San Diego Comic-Con last year in San Diego, Calif. (Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney)

The Walt Disney Co. has further postponed its next mega-movies from Marvel, including Black Widow, while also postponing Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story a full year in the company’s latest recalibration due to the pandemic.

Ten of Disney’s top films shuffled release dates Wednesday, uprooting several of the company’s major fall releases. The Scarlett Johansson Marvel movie Black Widow, last set for Nov. 6, heads now to May 7 of next year. Instead of opening next month, Kenneth Branagh’s murder mystery Death on the Nile moves to Dec. 18. That was the date set for West Side Story, but Spielberg’s musical will instead debut in December 2021.

Disney didn’t entirely abandon the season. The Pixar release Soul remains on the calendar for late November. But the delays of Disney’s upcoming blockbusters reinforce the growing exodus from 2020 among the movies that hadn’t already uprooted to next year.

Find out more about COVID-19

Still looking for more information on the pandemic? Read more about COVID-19’s impact on life in Canada, or reach out to us at covid@cbc.ca if you have any questions.

If you have symptoms of the illness caused by the coronavirus, here’s what to do in your part of the country.

For full coverage of how your province or territory is responding to COVID-19, visit your local CBC News site.

To get this newsletter daily as an email, subscribe here

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Concerns over safety, confusion over rollout of Ontario's pharmacy testing plan – Ottawa Citizen

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Article content continued

Patients can look up test results online, similar to the public health reporting sites, and positive cases will receive a call both from the pharmacist and from Public Health.

Staff at The Medicine Shoppe pharmacy on Canotek Road, one of the 60 pharmacies in Ontario designated for testing, said they would be offering testing to people after-hours, and would likely roll out testing this weekend.

The Cedarview Guardian pharmacy on Strandherd Drive said it was working toward offering testing but would not be ready for Friday.

Rexall, with one location in Orléans designated for testing, did not return a request for comment Thursday.

Hurley said the government should be working to expand capacity at existing assessment centres rather than engaging private companies in testing.

“You already have hospitals running assessment centres, where the only people going in there are professionals, well-equipped, regulated and supported by people in infection control. There’s intense cleaning and the only thing going on in those environments is testing,” Hurley said.

“With pharmacies, there’s whole side industry selling groceries, but a lot of the clientele who are going to a pharmacy are people with medical conditions, or people who are elderly who are going in to pick up prescriptions, and they’re not people who can afford to contract coronavirus,” Hurley said. “The idea you would use a commercial facility to test people seems really unwise, and I can’t imagine this is the safest alternative.

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Canada's COVID-19 cases: Half of recent Winnipeg cases linked to bars, restaurants; Ontario, Quebec report more than 100 new school infections – Yahoo News Canada

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On Thursday, Sept. 24, Ontario and Quebec once again reported worrisome case updates, as health officials try to contain the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Their situations within their communities have had an impact in their schools, with the two provinces reporting a combined 120 new infections among students and staff.

In Manitoba, there are now 449 currently infected patients, a new record-high. The majority are in Winnipeg, as health officials warn against a worrisome trend that has been developing in the city’s bars, pubs and restaurants among those in their 20s.

On the west coast, Dr. Deena Hinshaw expressed her disagreement with Justin Trudeau’s claim that Alberta is among the provinces that is currently experiencing a “second wave.” In addition, 13 school outbreak alerts have now been declared over.

In British Columbia, health officials announced 148 new cases, which marks the second largest spike in daily COVID-19 cases since the start of the pandemic.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="For more on today’s top stories, and on how the novel coronavirus continues to spread across the nation, please refer to our live updates below on Yahoo News Canada.” data-reactid=”20″>For more on today’s top stories, and on how the novel coronavirus continues to spread across the nation, please refer to our live updates below on Yahoo News Canada.

11,138 active COVID-19 cases in Canada: 149,094 diagnoses, 9,249 deaths and 128,707 recoveries (as of Sept. 24, 6:30 p.m. ET)

  • Alberta – 1,462 active cases (17,190 total cases, including 261 deaths, 15,467 resolved)

  • British Columbia – 1,371 active cases (8,543 total cases, 229 deaths, 6,917 resolved)

  • Manitoba – 449 active cases (1,711 total cases, 19 deaths, 1,243 resolved)

  • New Brunswick – 6 active cases (199 cases, 2 deaths, 191 resolved)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador – 1 active case (272 total cases, 3 deaths, 268 resolved)

  • Northwest Territories – 0 active cases (5 total cases, 5 resolved)

  • Nova Scotia – 1 active cases (1,087 total cases, 65 deaths 1,021 resolved)

  • Ontario – 3,774 active cases (48,496 total cases, 2,836 deaths, 41,886 resolved)

  • Prince Edward Island – 1 active case (58 total cases, 57 resolved)

  • Quebec –  3,917 active cases (69,670 total cases, 5,810 deaths, 59,943 resolved)

  • Saskatchewan – 130 active cases (1,835 total cases, 24 deaths, 1,681 resolved)

  • Yukon – 0 active cases (15 total cases, 15 resolved)

  • Nunavut – 0 active cases (4 false positive cases)

  • CFB Trenton – 0 active cases (13 total cases, 13 resolved)

Dr. Hinshaw doesn’t agree with Trudeau’s assessment that Alberta is in its ‘second wave’

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, did not agree with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s claim that the province is in its “second wave” of the COVID-19 pandemic.

During a public address on Wednesday, the prime minister said “in our four biggest provinces, the second wave isn’t just starting, it’s already underway.” However, Hinshaw said there are some key differences to consider between Alberta and other provinces when trying to define what exactly is a second wave.

“The concept of a second wave implies that we don’t have any control or influence over the circulation of the virus,” said Hinshaw. “In Alberta, I don’t think that that’s where we’re at right now.”

Hinshaw noted that the province has seen an increase in daily case counts for the last few months, but they have “remained relatively stable.” Alberta also hasn’t seen a “very large spike of uncontrolled spread.”

The chief medical officer noted that the province doesn’t necessarily need to have a second wave in its future. Instead, they can see a stable, relatively slow burn of a constant case count over time, or even small ripples that go up and down.

“To date we have not seen any single factor that seems to be driving the majority of cases, and therefore we have not imposed any additional restrictions,” said Hinshaw.

“Again, whether or not we have a steep sharp second wave is entirely within our hands, and we can prevent that without any additional formal restrictions.”

Hinshaw announced Thursday that the province’s labs have identified 158 new cases of COVID-19. One more person has died, while 215 patients have recovered, setting Alberta’s active case count to 1,462.

The most recent victim is part of the outbreak at the Foothills Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary. So far, the outbreak at the hospital has led to 29 linked cases, including 17 patients and three deaths.

Hinshaw also provided an update about the developing COVID-19 situation in schools.

There are now active alerts in 97 schools with 163 active cases among them. Throughout Alberta, that means there are only four per cent of schools that have a case.

Alerts at 13 schools have been declared over, with no signs of transmission being identified after all close contacts among students and teachers were forced to self-isolate.

Thirty-two schools have had outbreaks, meaning there have been at least two cases within a 14-day period. Seven of those outbreaks have seen likely transmission between individuals in the school setting.

“I remind everyone that although two confirmed cases in a school may qualify as an outbreak,” said Hinshaw. “It is not a sign that a school is unsafe”

Hinshaw says all throughout the pandemic, they’ve noticed a consistent correlation between the amount of cases in the community and the amount of cases among people 5-19 years old.

During the province’s peak week in April, labs tested 2,257 school aged children, resulting in 216 cases. Since school started in Alberta on Sept. 1, the province has “actually seen a week over week decrease,” among school aged children, despite consistent testing outputs.

Top Manitoba doctor shares troubling trend as province reaches new record-high for active cases

Manitoba's top doctor is pleading with the public to follow COVID-19 protocols when visiting restaurants, pubs and bars, as cases continue to spike in the province's largest city. (Getty Images)Manitoba's top doctor is pleading with the public to follow COVID-19 protocols when visiting restaurants, pubs and bars, as cases continue to spike in the province's largest city. (Getty Images)
Manitoba’s top doctor is pleading with the public to follow COVID-19 protocols when visiting restaurants, pubs and bars, as cases continue to spike in the province’s largest city. (Getty Images)

Dr. Brent Roussin, Manitoba’s chief public health officer, said the province is seeing an increasing number of COVID-19 cases among people in their 20s who were in bars, pubs and restaurants in Winnipeg. 

In recent weeks, about half of the patients in Winnipeg have been linked to those venues.

“It doesn’t mean they necessarily acquired it there, but that’s a staggeringly high number of people who were at these sites during their acquisition period,” said Roussin on Thursday.

Crowding and the number of people in attendance have been common problems that have raised concerns for health officials. Roussin said there have been individuals who have visited more than one bar in a single evening. In one instance, an individual visited multiple bars while symptomatic, which resulted in 36 close contacts.

“We know that we should be decreasing our time in enclosed spaces, crowded places and reducing prolonged contact,” said Roussin. “We certainly shouldn’t be out and about when we’re symptomatic.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Throughout Manitoba, there are now a record-high 449 active cases of COVID-19. Of those currently infected individuals, 364 of them are in the Winnipeg health region, according to provincial data.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”88″>Throughout Manitoba, there are now a record-high 449 active cases of COVID-19. Of those currently infected individuals, 364 of them are in the Winnipeg health region, according to provincial data. 

Of the remaining 37 new cases, four were identified in the Interlake-Eastern health region, two in Southern Health and one in Prairie Mountain, which used to be the province’s epicentre in August.

In addition, Roussin announced a case of COVID-19 in connection to Grant Park High School in Winnipeg, involving an individual who was at the school between Sept. 15-17. The risk of further spread is considered “low.”

The outbreak at Winnipeg’s John Pritchard School in Winnipeg has now been linked to 26 cases. However, not all the individuals were necessarily at the school. 

On Thursday, Roussin also announced one more COVID-19 related fatality, involving a woman in her 90s who lived at the Parkview Place personal care home in Winnipeg. Nineteen people have now died in Manitoba in connection to the virus.

Another day with over 400 cases in Ontario, 31 new infections in schools

Ontario reported 409 new cases on Thursday, which marks the fifth time over the past seven days that it has surpassed the 400 daily cases mark. 

Before the recent stretch, Ontario had not recorded over 400 cases in a 24-hour stretch since June 2. 

The latest patients were identified after the province completed 30,634 tests for COVID-19, leading to a positivity rate of 1.3 per cent — tied for its second highest output since late-June. 

Of the 409 new cases, 151 were identified in Toronto, 82 in Ottawa, 46 in Peel, 34 in York, 26 in Waterloo, 12 in Middlesex-London and 11 in Halton. All the other 27 public health units reported fewer than 10, while 15 reported no new patients at all. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Thirty-one new cases were identified in schools across Ontario in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch. Twenty-four of those include students, three involve staff, while the other four have not yet been identified by the Ministry of Health. Of the province’s 4,828 schools, there are now 178 that have had a case of COVID-19, with 210 total cases among them.” data-reactid=”98″>Thirty-one new cases were identified in schools across Ontario in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch. Twenty-four of those include students, three involve staff, while the other four have not yet been identified by the Ministry of Health. Of the province’s 4,828 schools, there are now 178 that have had a case of COVID-19, with 210 total cases among them.

Of the most recent 409 cases, 195 of them were among people 20-39 years old, the most of any age group. There were also 91 cases among those 40-59, and 64 among those 19 and under. Thirteen new cases were identified among long-term care residents and five among health-care workers. 

Throughout Ontario, one more person has died and 286 more patients have recovered from the respiratory virus. There are now 3,774 active cases, the most since June 9. Of those currently infected patients, there are 88 in hospital, which includes 27 in intensive care and 11 who require a ventilator.

On Thursday, Doug Ford and his provincial government announced that they’ll invest $1 billion on COVID-19 testing and contact tracing efforts as cases continue to rise around Ontario. In an effort to contain the spread and shorten wait times, Ford has asked people without COVID-19 symptoms, who are not at risk, to avoid getting tested. As of Thursday, there are 53,840 tests that are in the province’s backlog.

Quebec reports one of its largest spikes since May, 89 new cases in schools

Quebec reported 582 new cases on Thursday, the second most in a 24-hour stretch since May 27.

Earlier this week on Monday, the province announced 586 cases of COVID-19.

It’s now the sixth straight time that the province has recorded more than 400 cases, and the 13th straight time that it has reported more than 200. The last time Quebec had a similar stretch was in late-May to early-June; since then it has enjoyed multiple stretches where it consistently reported fewer than 100 daily cases as it contained the spread of COVID-19 within the province.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Of the most recent cases, 247 were identified in Montreal, 103 in Quebec City, 53 in Montérégie, 36 in Outaouais, 29 in Laval and 25 in Estrie. Of the 18 regions, eight of them reported fewer than 10 cases, while four reported no new patients at all.” data-reactid=”110″>Of the most recent cases, 247 were identified in Montreal, 103 in Quebec City, 53 in Montérégie, 36 in Outaouais, 29 in Laval and 25 in Estrie. Of the 18 regions, eight of them reported fewer than 10 cases, while four reported no new patients at all.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Throughout Quebec schools, 89 new cases were identified among students and 23 among staff. Since 29 more school cases have recovered, there are now 576 currently infected students and 72 staff in the province. So far, at least 359 class bubbles have been sent home and asked to learn remotely, up by 34 since Wednesday’s report. Of the province’s 3,089 schools, 457 of them have had a case of COVID-19, up by 30.” data-reactid=”111″>Throughout Quebec schools, 89 new cases were identified among students and 23 among staff. Since 29 more school cases have recovered, there are now 576 currently infected students and 72 staff in the province. So far, at least 359 class bubbles have been sent home and asked to learn remotely, up by 34 since Wednesday’s report. Of the province’s 3,089 schools, 457 of them have had a case of COVID-19, up by 30.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its output from two days prior. Most recently, it completed 25,553 tests for COVID-19, as it continues to push its capacity. 

No one has died in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, but one more fatality was added to its death toll (5,810) that occurred between Sept. 17-22. Instead, the province noted that 257 more patients have recovered, meaning there are now 3,917 currently infected patients in Quebec, which 184 people in hospital and 31 in intensive care.

Quebec currently leads the way in active and total cases, as well as COVID-19-related deaths throughout the pandemic.

British Columbia records its second largest spike in cases, 30 exposure events so far in schools

Dr. Bonnie Henry, British Columbia’s provincial health officer, announced 148 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday, which marks the second largest one-day spike since the start of the pandemic.

On Sept. 17, 165 cases were announced for a record-high.

With the latest increase in cases, Henry was asked if the province plans on taking further precautions to limit gatherings around the province. Since late-August, officials have increased fines for party organizers, and have also closed nightclubs and banquets.

Henry said the province has taken necessary enforcement measures for some of the university parties that have taken place as of late, but that the measures they have in place have been “relatively successful in the last few weeks”.

“It’s not the number [of cases], in and of itself, that’s the issue,” said Hinshaw. “What is important for us is to say, ‘Can we manage this outbreak, this pandemic? Make sure that we’re doing everything we can to prevent transmission.

“Obviously, I would prefer if we had far fewer people being infected, because we know every time somebody transmits it to somebody else, there’s a risk that is going to be somebody who gets very sick or dies.”

In the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, two more people have passed away in Fraser Health, which increases B.C.’s death toll to 229. In addition, 148 people have recently recovered.

Throughout the province there are now 1,371 active cases of COVID-19, the fewest since Sept. 7. There are also 3,417 people who are self-isolating and are being actively monitored by B.C. public health, since they were in contact with a known COVID-19 patient. 

Henry said there have been 30 school exposure events throughout its more than 2,000 schools. However, by B.C.’s definition, there have been no outbreaks that have identified so far.

“That is not surprising to me,” said Henry. “With millions of children going back into the schools in the last few weeks, this is to be expected.”

<h2 class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Updates from across Canada” data-reactid=”126″>Updates from across Canada

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="No new cases were identified in Nova Scotia or Newfoundland and Labrador, which continue to have one active case of COVID-19 each. As of Prince Edward Island’s last update on Wednesday, there remains one active case in its province as well.” data-reactid=”127″>No new cases were identified in Nova Scotia or Newfoundland and Labrador, which continue to have one active case of COVID-19 each. As of Prince Edward Island’s last update on Wednesday, there remains one active case in its province as well.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Two new cases were identified in New Brunswick. One of the cases involves an individual in their 40s, who is currently in Ontario and will stay there until they have recovered. They live permanently in the Fredecition region. The other patient is in their 60s in the Moncton region, and their reason for transmission is believed to be travel related. In addition, health officials notified the public that there is a Quebec resident in the Campbellton region who has tested positive; they will stay in N.B. until they recovered. However, they are not counted among the province’s six active cases.” data-reactid=”128″>Two new cases were identified in New Brunswick. One of the cases involves an individual in their 40s, who is currently in Ontario and will stay there until they have recovered. They live permanently in the Fredecition region. The other patient is in their 60s in the Moncton region, and their reason for transmission is believed to be travel related. In addition, health officials notified the public that there is a Quebec resident in the Campbellton region who has tested positive; they will stay in N.B. until they recovered. However, they are not counted among the province’s six active cases.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Saskatchewan reported five new cases of COVID-19, but that also eight more patients have recovered. Of the recently diagnosed, two are in Saskatoon, while there is one each in the Central West, Regina and South Central zones. Of the province’s total cases, 130 are considered active. The Saskatoon region is home to 75 of those currently infected patients, while throughout Saskatchewan there are eight people in hospital.” data-reactid=”129″>Saskatchewan reported five new cases of COVID-19, but that also eight more patients have recovered. Of the recently diagnosed, two are in Saskatoon, while there is one each in the Central West, Regina and South Central zones. Of the province’s total cases, 130 are considered active. The Saskatoon region is home to 75 of those currently infected patients, while throughout Saskatchewan there are eight people in hospital.

Timelines of cases prior to August:

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