Connect with us

Business

Sudbury public health reports another five cases of COVID-19 – Sudbury.com

Published

 on


Public Health Sudbury & Districts (PHSD) has reported five new cases of COVID-19 on that same day that Ontario has reported a record high number of COVID-19 cases. The latest case count follows PHSD’s record high Friday November 6, where no less than 20 news cases were added to the count.

PHSD said  these newest cases, numbers 163 to 167 are all in Greater Sudbury. Four of the cases are described as close contacts of confirmed cases, and one case has no known epidemiological link (unknown exposure). All are following PHSD direction and are self-isolating said a news release Saturday evening.

Travel, gatherings, and households

Public Health Sudbury & Districts is reminding everyone that the safest options are to avoid non-essential travel, limit indoor gatherings to your own household, and otherwise be outdoors or go virtual, practise physical distancing, masking, and handwashing, and of course, stay away if you have any symptoms.

As much as possible, Ontarians are encouraged to limit outings to essentials like going to work or school, picking up groceries, attending a medical appointment, or engaging in outdoor physical activity. For all outings, continue to practise COVID-safe behaviours like distancing and wearing a face covering.

Although permissible for up to 10 people indoors and 25 outdoors, in-person gatherings of any size should be limited and should always include distance and masking when distancing is not possible. Limiting our contacts and in-person interactions as much as possible is critical in reducing the spread of COVID-19. Unless people are from the same household, keep 2 metres (6 feet) apart and wear a face covering if distancing is not possible. Face coverings must be worn in all indoor public spaces, and they must also be worn in other indoor spaces where distancing is not possible.

As of October 3, 2020, the Province of Ontario is pausing social circles and advising that all Ontarians allow close contact only with people living in their own household and maintain two metres physical distancing from everyone else. Individuals who live alone may consider having close contact with another household.

 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Asian shares open higher following stellar month of gains – Reuters

Published

 on


(Corrects to China’s index, not futures, in paragraph 3)

SYDNEY/NEW YORK, Dec 1 (Reuters) – Asian share markets opened slightly higher on Tuesday buoyed by the prospect of a COVID-19 vaccine, reversing the previous day’s dips as investors took profits at the end of a record-breaking month.

MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan added 0.26% on Tuesday after closing the month 9% higher, the best November since 2001. Japan’s Nikkei and Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 were each 0.9% higher, while South Korea was up 1.4%.

China’s blue-chip CSI300 index was 0.72% higher on Tuesday, after data on Monday that pointed to a continued recovery in the world’s second-largest economy against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We’ve seen clearly a huge wave of liquidity coming to equities in response to the vaccine news and in response to U.S. election news,” said Hamish Tadgell, a portfolio manager at SG Hiscock & Company.

“But there are still risks, and as a result we could see the market pull back, I think, particularly as we come into sort of the Christmas period.”

Wall Street was weaker on Monday, partly driven by a rebalancing of portfolios, as investors cashed in on gains after a strong month punctuated by updates of COVID-19 vaccines progressing and hopes of a swift economic rebound next year.

“There was profit taking around the world so we ended a record month with a whimper not a bang, and you know, taking a little bit of a breather,” said Interactive Brokers Chief Strategist Steve Sosnick.

“I think that markets are pricing in, if not fully pricing a recovery, they are pricing in the vast majority of it (and) it’s very hard to meet these elevated expectations.”

MSCI’s gauge of stocks across the globe was roughly flat. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index futures were down 0.36%, while China’s CSI 300 futures were 0.36% higher.

In the United States the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.91% on Monday while the S&P 500 lost 0.46%. The tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite ended down 0.06%.

Moderna Inc applied for U.S. emergency authorization for its COVID-19 vaccine after full results from a late-stage study showed it was 94.1% effective with no serious safety concerns.

“U.S. markets were a little bit lower, that’s what was holding us back a little bit,” said Chris Weston, head of research at Melbourne brokerage Pepperstone. “People are pretty optimistic for a good 2021.”

The dollar was under pressure on Tuesday, after closing out its worst month since July with a little bounce and as investors reckon on even more U.S. monetary easing.

Oil prices were slightly lower on uncertainty about whether the world’s major oil producers would agree to extend deep output cuts at talks this week.

U.S. crude eased back 11 cents to $45.23 a barrel on Tuesday, while Brent crude futures were largely unchanged at $47.86.

Reporting by Paulina Duran in Sydney and Jessica DiNapoli in New York; Editing by Lincoln Feast and Stephen Coates

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Braid: Moderna boss won't push Canada aside in rush for COVID-19 vaccine – Calgary Herald

Published

 on


Article content continued

Minister of Health Patty Hajdu responds to a question during Question Period in the House of Commons Thursday October 8, 2020 in Ottawa. Photo by Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press/File

COVID-19 vaccines are a far more complex problem. The feds both purchase and distribute. They must work out timing and systems with each province and territory. Some vaccines require very complex shipping.

And first, federal regulators must also approve the vaccines.

“We will never interfere with the regulators’ work,” Hajdu said.

“They have to be independent so that they can make those decisions free of political influence. That can give Canadians comfort that whatever we approve will be safe.”

The Liberal record on political interference is not exactly stellar, so we will hold her to that.

But Hajdu, who has been pilloried as clueless and incompetent, strikes me as able, well meaning and fully attuned to the enormous challenges she faces.

She says she can’t pinpoint “an exact date” for distribution.

“It’s not all going to happen at once,” she notes. “In every country in the world this planning is going on right now, figuring out who the priority populations are to get these first vaccines.”

Maybe Canada failed to plan early enough to distribute something that did not yet exist. Surely there will be inefficiencies.

But we are in a silent war. As in all times of war, vast systems have to be re-shaped to effectively attack the enemy.

It’s difficult work but Canadians have long since proven we are very good at it.

Although Alberta’s pandemic is escalating daily – a record 1,733 new cases announced Monday – there’s also far more hopeful news than we could have imagined only a month ago.

Don Braid’s column appears regularly in the Herald

The original column has been altered to reflect Nov. 30 case count.

dbraid@postmedia.com

Twitter: @DonBraid

Facebook: Don Braid Politics

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Asian shares open higher following stellar month of gains – Reuters

Published

 on


Healthcare

Paulina Duran
Jessica DiNapoli

(Corrects to China’s index, not futures, in paragraph 3)

SYDNEY/NEW YORK, Dec 1 (Reuters) – Asian share markets opened slightly higher on Tuesday buoyed by the prospect of a COVID-19 vaccine, reversing the previous day’s dips as investors took profits at the end of a record-breaking month.

MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan added 0.26% on Tuesday after closing the month 9% higher, the best November since 2001. Japan’s Nikkei and Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 were each 0.9% higher, while South Korea was up 1.4%.

China’s blue-chip CSI300 index was 0.72% higher on Tuesday, after data on Monday that pointed to a continued recovery in the world’s second-largest economy against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We’ve seen clearly a huge wave of liquidity coming to equities in response to the vaccine news and in response to U.S. election news,” said Hamish Tadgell, a portfolio manager at SG Hiscock & Company.

“But there are still risks, and as a result we could see the market pull back, I think, particularly as we come into sort of the Christmas period.”

Wall Street was weaker on Monday, partly driven by a rebalancing of portfolios, as investors cashed in on gains after a strong month punctuated by updates of COVID-19 vaccines progressing and hopes of a swift economic rebound next year.

“There was profit taking around the world so we ended a record month with a whimper not a bang, and you know, taking a little bit of a breather,” said Interactive Brokers Chief Strategist Steve Sosnick.

“I think that markets are pricing in, if not fully pricing a recovery, they are pricing in the vast majority of it (and) it’s very hard to meet these elevated expectations.”

MSCI’s gauge of stocks across the globe was roughly flat. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index futures were down 0.36%, while China’s CSI 300 futures were 0.36% higher.

In the United States the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.91% on Monday while the S&P 500 lost 0.46%. The tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite ended down 0.06%.

Moderna Inc applied for U.S. emergency authorization for its COVID-19 vaccine after full results from a late-stage study showed it was 94.1% effective with no serious safety concerns.

“U.S. markets were a little bit lower, that’s what was holding us back a little bit,” said Chris Weston, head of research at Melbourne brokerage Pepperstone. “People are pretty optimistic for a good 2021.”

The dollar was under pressure on Tuesday, after closing out its worst month since July with a little bounce and as investors reckon on even more U.S. monetary easing.

Oil prices were slightly lower on uncertainty about whether the world’s major oil producers would agree to extend deep output cuts at talks this week.

U.S. crude eased back 11 cents to $45.23 a barrel on Tuesday, while Brent crude futures were largely unchanged at $47.86.


© 2020 Reuters. All Rights Reserved.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending