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Telus skips Huawei, picks Ericsson and Nokia to build 5G network – Vancouver Sun

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Telus has opted to go with Ericsson and Nokia — skipping Chinese tech giant Huawei — to build its 5G network.

The Vancouver-based company announced Tuesday it had signed a deal with Sweden’s Ericsson and Finland’s Nokia to provide the components for its 5G network. No figures were given on how much the deal cost.

“Telus has a successful track record of building globally leading networks with amazing speeds, robust quality and extensive coverage that are consistently recognized as the best in the world,” Telus president Darren Entwistle said  in a statement.

“Our team is committed to rolling out superior network technology from urban to rural communities, fuelling our economy and driving innovation as we power Canadians into the 5G era through an unparalleled network experience.”

Entwistle promised in his statement the 5G boost would support post-pandemic economic recovery, virtual health, remote work and other practices now common as a result of COVID-19.

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Premier John Horgan skirts issue of restricting American’s access to B.C. businesses – Globalnews.ca

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B.C. Premier John Horgan did not directly address the issue Thursday of restricting U.S. citizens from businesses in B.C.

During a media availability Horgan says he understands businesses want to see the millions of travellers come back from the U.S.

Residents and health officials have expressed concern that U.S. citizens crossing the border could lead to a rise in COVID-19 cases in the province.

Cases have surged in many parts of the U.S. recently and the border between Canada and the U.S. has been closed to all but essential travel until at least July 21. A mandatory 14-day quarantine period for people entering Canada is in place until Aug. 31.

However, vehicles with U.S. licence plates are being spotted at Vancouver hotels and in more remote parts of the province.

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Read more:
Three new deaths as B.C. COVID-19 cases top 3,000

Last week, Horgan raised concerns over U.S. tourists stopping in Port Renfrew, B.C. after telling border officials they were driving directly to Alaska.

“Essential travel” includes U.S. citizens transiting through the province to Alaska, raising concerns of a so-called “Alaska loophole” to the border closure.

Read more:
Coronavirus: B.C. premier raises ‘Alaska loophole’ with feds amid U.S. vehicle sightings

Horgan was optimistic about how the spread of COVID-19 has slowed down in B.C., adding the province’s restart plan is going well.

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He said coping with the virus was the strategy all along in B.C.

–with files from Simon Little

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Coronavirus live updates: Quebec reports 137 new cases, 6 more deaths – Montreal Gazette

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People will also need to leave the premises as of 1 a.m., Dubé said, and dancing will be banned — everyone consuming drinks will need to be seated.

Customers will also be asked to sign a register so they can be traced in the event of an outbreak, but it won’t be required.

The measures come into effect tomorrow.

“We’re asking for a collective effort. I’m counting on people’s intelligence and for them to take what just happened seriously,” Dubé said, referring to an outbreak on the South Shore earlier this week following parties.

“If this doesn’t get the job done, there’s a next step: closing (venues) down,” Dubé said.

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Groups demand feds ban use of facial recognition technology – CP24 Toronto's Breaking News

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OTTAWA — Dozens of groups and individuals working to protect privacy, human rights and civil liberties want the Trudeau government to ban the use of facial-recognition surveillance by federal law-enforcement and intelligence agencies.

In an open letter to Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, they call the technology “highly problematic,” given its lack of accuracy and invasive nature, and say it poses a threat to Canadians’ fundamental rights.

They tell the minister that in the absence of meaningful policy or regulation governing facial recognition, it cannot be considered safe for use in Canada.

The letter is signed by Tim McSorley, national co-ordinator of the Ottawa-based International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group, and Laura Tribe, executive director of Open Media, who are spearheading the campaign.

It is endorsed by 29 other prominent groups including Amnesty International Canada, the Canadian Federation of Students, the Canadian Muslim Lawyers Association and Privacy International, as well as 46 academics, researchers, lawyers and other civil society members.

The letter also calls on the government to initiate a meaningful, public consultation on all aspects of facial-recognition technology in Canada and to establish clear, transparent policies and laws regulating its use, including reforms to federal privacy law.

The letter comes as concerns mount over police killing and mistreatment of Black and Indigenous people, prompting widespread discussion about curbing the powers and resources of law-enforcement agencies.

“At a time like this, the public should be certain of the fact that their rights and freedoms are protected,” the letter says.

The federal privacy commissioner said this week that U.S. firm Clearview AI will stop offering its facial-recognition services in Canada in response to an investigation by the commissioner and three provincial counterparts.

Clearview AI’s technology worries many privacy advocates because it apparently allows for the collection of huge numbers of images from various sources with the aim of helping police forces, financial institutions and other clients identify individuals.

Clearview’s retreat includes an indefinite suspension of the company’s contract with the RCMP, its last remaining client in Canada.

Federal officials have also used photo-matching technology to pinpoint people – all wanted on immigration warrants – who used false identities to apply for travel documents.

But the letter to Blair says inadequate regulation of facial recognition and a lack of information means it is impossible to know which police forces and intelligence agencies are using the tool, and to what ends, including during protests.

It cites studies that have found the technology to be inaccurate and especially prone to misidentifying the faces of women and people with darker skin.

“These errors can lead already marginalized communities to be even more likely to face profiling, harassment and violations of their fundamental rights,” the letter says.

This is particularly concerning given the technology’s use in situations where biases are common, including when individuals are travelling and crossing borders as well as in the context of criminal investigations, and national security and anti-terrorism operations, it says.

“If, as federal officials have said, the Canadian government is serious about ending racial disparities in policing, banning facial recognition surveillance is a clear first step.”

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