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The Art Angle Podcast: How Jeffrey Epstein Made the Art World His Hunting Ground – artnet News

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Welcome to the Art Angle, a podcast from Artnet News that delves into the places where the art world meets the real world, bringing each week’s biggest story down to earth. Join host Andrew Goldstein every week for an in-depth look at what matters most in museums, the art market, and much more with input from our own writers and editors as well as artists, curators, and other top experts in the field.

Over the past few weeks, the long-awaited trial of former Hollywood rainmaker Harvey Weinstein has unfolded in harrowing fashion, with one after another of his accusers taking the stand to allege patterns of sexual and psychological abuse. The grim courtroom proceedings are only the latest shockwave from the #MeToo movement, which grew from accusations against Weinstein into a national reckoning with sexual harassment, sexual assault, and other rampant abuses perpetrated by those in positions of power.

The art world has not been a safe haven from this heinous activity. In fact, one of the most notorious predators in the mainstream news cycle also cast a long shadow over this niche industry. This week on the Art Angle, Andrew Goldstein sits down with Artnet News deputy editor Rachel Corbett to discuss a serial predator whose victims inside and outside the arts will never have the chance to confront him: Jeffrey Epstein.

Many questions remain to be answered after Epstein, the former financier, arts patron, and convicted sex offender who counted numerous elite figures among his inner circle, was found dead of an apparent suicide in his jail cell while waiting to stand trial for charges of sex trafficking in New York. But his alleged crimes have taken on new life in the art world due to detailed, troubling accusations made by painter and former New York Academy of Art student Maria Farmer, who claims Epstein and his associates leveraged her creative ambitions against her for their own perverse ends.

Farmer’s disturbing story details how Epstein turned the largely unregulated art world into a hunting ground for new victims. The issues raised by her accusations also loom large over all creative fields, where personal relationships and favors from the top of the hierarchy can make or break the careers of young, talented people striving to make their mark.

Listen below and subscribe to the Art Angle on Apple PodcastsSpotifySoundCloud, or wherever you get your podcasts. (Or catch up on past episodes here on Artnet News.)

Please be advised: This episode contains accounts of sexual abuse that some listeners may find disturbing. 

Listen to Other Episodes:

The Art Angle Podcast: How the Art World Fell Under the Spell of the Occult

The Art Angle Podcast: Nicolas Party on Why Being an Art Star Is Like Being in Love

The Art Angle Podcast: What Do the Protests in Hong Kong Mean for Art?

The Art Angle Podcast: Four Predictions on How the Art World Will Transform Itself in 2020

The Art Angle Podcast: The Radical, Viral Artworks That Defined the 2010s

The Art Angle Podcast: How an Artist’s $120,000 Banana Ate the World

The Art Angle Podcast: New Yorker Art Scribe Calvin Tomkins on What Makes Great Artists Tick

The Art Angle Podcast: Is the Art World Causing a Climate Catastrophe?

The Art Angle Podcast: Art Basel Rules the Art Market. Is That a Good Thing for Art?

The Art Angle Podcast: How Yayoi Kusama Became an Unlikely Pop-Culture Phenomenon

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Spreading roots: City of Charlottetown calling for art proposals for tree appreciation program – Saltwire

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CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. — The City of Charlottetown is accepting proposals for Rooted in Art, an opportunity for P.E.I. artists to create temporary art installations inspired by Charlottetown trees.

Rooted in Art matches local artists with trees on public land in Charlottetown create an art installation on or around a tree.

The project was first held in fall 2020 and is meant to engage the community with nature in a new way and reflect the importance of the urban forest.

Nancy Coles contribution to Rooted in Art hangs on a littleleaf linden tree in Victoria Park. - Michael Robar
Nancy Coles contribution to Rooted in Art in 2020 hangs on a littleleaf linden tree in Victoria Park. – Michael Robar

This year, four artists will be selected to install temporary art installations in different locations in the city. The structures will be on display over two weeks in October.

All Island artists are eligible to submit proposals for Rooted in Art, with a limit of one proposal per artist.

Applications will be accepted until Aug. 30 at 4 p.m. and can be sent by email to [email protected] or delivered to City Hall at 199 Queen St.

More information on the project and application requirements is available online.

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Canada's largest women's festival, Kingston Women's Art Festival, returns – Kingstonist

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On Sunday, the Kingston Women’s Art Festival will return to City Park to celebrate women artists. Bring the family, browse, and enjoy original art designed and created by women. Sasha Jiminez French, local multi-disciplinary artist, is volunteering her time to help ensure the festival returns to full strength after the

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Windsor Public Library wants to show you local art while you ride your bike – CBC.ca

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Windsor Public Library wants to showcase the city’s downtown art. It plans to have two cycling tours to show it off.

Becky Mayer, a librarian at the Windsor Public Library organized the tours. She said the main reason she wanted to do this is because people think there’s nothing to do or see in Windsor.

“I often ride my bike around and I see a lot of cool and weird stuff,” said Mayer. “So, I just thought that maybe a few people would want to join me on a weird stuff tour.”

Mayer said she’ll be bringing Betty the Bookmobile along for the journey. She said the ride will be pretty casual and if someone has a story to tell she’s happy to give them space to share.

“I’m fine with talking as well. If you want to have a silent tour, that’s also cool. Like, it’s very, very casual. Go with the flow. We’ll see what happens,” Mayer said.

The first tour starts at 6 p.m. August 16, the second tour is on August 20 starting at 10 a.m. The tours last about an hour and starts at the library’s Central Branch at the corner of Ouellette Avenue and Pitt Street.

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