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The Art of Skincare with La Prairie – Vanity Fair

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La Prairie has always been a skincare brand that has art at its core, but a new partnership with Fondation Beyeler strengthens this keen cultural connection.

Think high-performance luxury skincare and immediately La Prairie, the revered Swiss brand, comes to mind. The two are synonymous. Delve a little deeper under the skin of the lauded house, however, and you uncover something its loyal following has always known—the world of contemporary art courses through La Prairie’s veins.

The unconvinced need only take one look at the evidence. The brand’s founder, Dr. Paul Niehans, took inspiration from Bauhaus, the art movement steeped in an “art in everything” ethos, hence this sensibility is clear in everything La Prairie does. The unmistakable rich cobalt blue glass skincare jars and bottles designed by French-American sculptor Niki de Saint Phalle; the collaborations with world-class art fairs such as Art Basel in Basel, Hong Kong and Miami, where the brand supports and commissions up-and-coming as well as established artists, raising their profile on a global scale while also previewing their latest exquisite technologically driven skincare.

This time, however, its latest launch is not a bottle of serum targeting fine lines or a depuffing eye cream. In fact, there are no products to speak of. Rather, La Prairie has joined forces with Fondation Beyeler, one of the most prestigious art institutions in Switzerland, on a two-year partnership to support the Piet Mondrian Conservation Project. This collaboration, explains Greg Prodromides, La Prairie’s Chief Marketing Officer, not only highlights the importance of conserving art for posterity, “it takes our cultural engagement to another level”.

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Three-fold thinking behind the collaboration, says Prodromides, made this union a no-brainer. “Fondation Beyeler is another Swiss House like us that shares the same values of perfection and the quest for very high quality. It is also in line with the vision that we have: to build luxury with a higher meaning. Also, it is Piet Mondrian, an artist who has deeply influenced the expression of the house of La Prairie.” Mondrian, famed for his abstract geometric paintings, is widely considered one of the greatest artists of the 20th Century; when you consider his influence across the world of design, culture and fashion, it’s an accolade that cannot be argued with. Fondation Beyeler, the museum founded by Ernst Beyeler—the art collector and dealer behind Art Basel—holds one of the most prestigious collections of Mondrians in Switzerland.

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Fondation Beyeler

MARK NIEDERMANN

A paean to modern and contemporary art, it carries more than 400 Post-Impressionist, classical modern and contemporary works. This is why the temporary exhibitions, held three to four times a year—think pioneering artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Henri Matisse, Jeff Koons, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Pablo Picasso—see art lovers flock in from far and wide.

In 2022, the highly anticipated subject of choice will be Mondrian, and the institution is tasked with conserving four of his minimalist artworks—Tableau No 1; Composition with Yellow and Blue; Composition with Double Line and Blue; and Lozenge Composition with Eight Lines and Red. It is a task Marcus Gross, the Head of Conservation at Fondation Beyeler, sees not simply as a vocation, but as a calling and responsibility. “Our mission is the long-term preservation of art, hence we do very deep research on the technique and materials used by the artist and the condition of the artwork.”

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Piet Mondrian, Composition with Yellow and Blue, 1932. Fondation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel.

Robert Bayer

A remarkable commitment to conserving inimitable artworks is something the conservators at Fondation Beyeler are famed for. It is an intensive, holistic approach, which involves studying, documenting, analysing and, essentially, going beyond the perfunctory in order to display the original intention of the artist. Just like the technologically advanced, groundbreaking skincare formulas that La Prairie has built its reputation on, science, explains Gross, “plays a very important role. By using various scientific techniques and equipment, we are able to decide exactly how to preserve artworks in the future”.

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It is impossible to detach the role of conservation from the future of art, hence, explains Ulrike Erbsloh, Managing Director at Foundation Beyeler, the significance of La Prairie’s patronage. “Through this partnership,” he says, “we are able to communicate to the wider public that art conservation is absolutely crucial to artworks being preserved for future generations.”

Prodromides echoes Erbsloh’s sentiments adding, “Art is part of who we are. Our attitude, our DNA, a prism through which we look at the world. So this project is our way of contributing back to our communities and doing our part to make the world a little more beautiful, not just for today but also for the generations to come.”

Discover more at La Prairie.

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University of Alberta med students bring therapeutic art to isolated seniors – Global News

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A group of Edmonton seniors have contributed to an art display inside the Southgate Centre shopping mall.

The group used self-portraits to express how COVID-19 has impacted their lives.

Devonshire Continuing Care Centre resident Hazel D’hont said it’s been a challenging few months.

“I do feel lonely. My daughter and son can only visit me by the desk (at the front of the facility),” she said. “If the doors were wide open (and back to normal), they would come anytime.”


Drawings inside Southgate Centre.


Courtesy: Danielle Portnoy

The 87-year-old woman said she has missed the regular programming that happened before COVID-19.

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“We did all kinds of things, especially bingo. I love bingo,” D’hont said. “You just kind of sit around now… and it’s been like that for many months.”

Read more:
Edmonton seniors’ centre reopens to help with socialization through COVID-19

The therapeutic art project that she took part in was created by two medical students at the University of Alberta.

Asad Makhani and Danielle Portnoy have prior experience working in long-term facilities doing recreational therapy.

Read more:
Workers inside Good Samaritan Southgate say resident care is being neglected

Makhani works part-time at Devonshire and Portnoy’s late father lived in a long-term care facility. The project’s name “Seniors Advocacy Movement” was chosen because the acronym SAM matches her father’s name.

“When I visited my dad, I felt that even before the pandemic, many people there were lonely and isolated. So now, with family restricted from visiting, it must be worse,” Portnoy said.

Asad Makhani and Danielle Portnoy


Asad Makhani and Danielle Portnoy.


Courtesy: Danielle Portnoy

The students chose the project because they had seen research that community art programs help combat isolation in seniors.

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“It’s a way to show their feelings,” Portnoy said. “And then putting it in Southgate makes it like they are socializing with people in the mall… but distantly.”

Asad, who helped participants with the activity, said the residents were excited about painting.

“We sat down one-on-one and a lot of them were really excited to participate in the activity. They mentioned they hadn’t painted in so long,” he said. “They were a lot happier. They were more engaged. It was a drastic change in their mood.”

The two students hope to bring the project to other long-term care facilities in the city.

Read more:
‘From here to the box’: Seniors voice terrifying concerns on long-term care amid COVID-19

“As long as it’s following Alberta Health guidelines, we would like to provide canvas and paint and expand to other long-term care facilities in the city,” Portnoy said.

D’hont said the art project was fun, but she valued the interaction it brought the most.

“It was nice to have more people around me. It certainly was. If we can open our doors once again… I’ll be happy.”

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Rhiannon Giddens on making art during a pandemic, and how music bridges divides – CBC.ca

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Grammy Award-winning musician Rhiannon Giddens says the pandemic is forcing artists to re-examine why they make art in the first place.

“I do think that art and commerce are uneasy bedfellows,” the singer-songwriter and founding member of old-time string band Carolina Chocolate Drops told The Current‘s Matt Galloway.

“So I think this is the moment, since nobody’s making money … to go, OK, so what is the role of art in society and how can we decouple this?”

Giddens is well-known for making music across genres; she also co-founded the group Our Native Daughters, an Americana-folk band. And like many performers, Giddens has had to adapt her approach to making music during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

She’s kept busy in recent months by taking part in virtual concerts and collaborating with other artists from their respective locations around the world.

“At a moment where I really needed to make some music and to be in that space, it was a kind of a godsend,” Giddens said about the experience.

Watch Rhiannon Giddens and Yo-Yo Ma’s virtual collaboration

[embedded content]

But, she added, she misses the interaction and feedback she normally gets from performing for live audiences.

“Nothing’s being fed back to me because I’m not performing. So I have to figure out how to keep the well stocked, you know?”

Part of that comes from these creative moments, even if they’re from a distance, she said.

She’s also trying to find the positives in every moment, and the purpose of difficult situations like the pandemic.

“For me, it was stopping,” said Giddens, who realized how burnt out she was once her gigs and tours were cancelled because of the pandemic.

While that has been a challenge, she said she doesn’t get worked up about it.

“I just kind of firmly remain grateful and thinking about what I can do with what I have, the advantages that I have, in terms of making art that hopefully will speak to someone and … make a small difference.”

Music as a bridge

Giddens told Galloway she has always been intrigued by how music reveals the commonalities among people.

She hopes to explore that idea further in her new role as artistic director of Silkroad. Started by cellist Yo-Yo Ma in 1998, the Boston-based non-profit organization seeks to create music that sparks “radical cultural collaboration.”

There are things that bind us. And I’ve always been interested in how that is reflected in our culture and our arts and our music.– Rhiannon Giddens

“When you look at history, when you look at different cultures, we actually are very similar,” she said. “There are things that bind us. And I’ve always been interested in how that is reflected in our culture and our arts and our music.”

Giddens was born and raised in North Carolina to a white father and Black and Native American mother. Although she now lives in Ireland with her two children, she remains vocal about the political and social issues currently gripping the United States, including the Black Lives Matter movement and the upcoming presidential election.

A MacArthur ‘Genius Grant’ recipient who plays several instruments, Giddens is best known for her work on the banjo. She said the instrument parallels the history of America because it was created by African descendants before being adopted as a white ethnic cultural instrument.

Watch Giddens’s song Cry No More, recreated in the wake of Breonna Taylor’s death.

[embedded content]

While many Americans are unaware of this history, she added, it’s important to understand it.

“So much of the heart of what American culture is, a lot of it comes from the struggles and the story of Black America,” she said. “And the conversation that is being had between cultures like that is America. That is American music. And the banjo very nicely represents that.”

She said her own personal experience informs her belief that music can serve as a powerful bridge.

“I think it comes from being a neither nor,” she said. “That’s what I am. I was neither Black nor white. I was neither city nor country. I’m neither classical nor folk. 

“I’ve spent a lot of time in each world … and I think [I] have a deep understanding of each world. But I’ve come to accept pretty early on that my job is as a bridge between those worlds.”


Written and produced by Idella Sturino.

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Revival House mural part of local push for more public-art projects in Stratford – The Beacon Herald

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Two local artists are nearly finished creating a mural on the side of a shipping container in a Stratford restaurant’s parking lot as part of an initiative by the Stratford City Centre BIA and the regional tourism organization to bring more public art to the city.

Stratford artists Claire Scott and Amparo Villalobos were recently commissioned to a paint a mural on a shipping container in the parking lot at Revival House in downtown Stratford by the Stratford City Centre BIA in an effort to bring more colour and public art to the city. (Galen Simmons/The Beacon Herald)

Over the past few weeks, those who have passed by the rear parking lot at Revival House in Stratford may have noticed a colourful, new addition to the normally drab space.

At the far east side of the lot, Stratford artists Claire Scott and Amparo Villalobos have been painting a colourful and striking mural on the side of a large shipping container as part of a public-art initiative launched this year by the Stratford City Centre BIA and RTO4, the regional tourism organization for Waterloo and surrounding region.

“For a number of years, we’ve been looking at different walls, speaking with different owners of buildings, and just trying to convince them in general to be able to secure a wall for a mural, which is a little bit more difficult than you would imagine,” said Rebecca Scott, general manager of the Stratford City Centre BIA.

“We’re in this premier art town, and we don’t have a ton of public art going on.”

In January, the BIA partnered with RTO4 to embark on one of these mural projects. Though they had a Toronto artist lined up, the project was pushed to the side as the BIA focused its effort and budget on pandemic responses and recovery efforts.

But the project wasn’t forgotten and, by the time summer began to wind down, Rebecca Scott approached Revival House restaurant owner Rob Wigan about having some local artists paint a mural on a shipping container sitting in the restaurant’s back parking lot.

“We didn’t think we were going to be able to do a mural this year, and then toward the end of the summer we started to look at some of the objectives we had throughout the year and we tried to start the ball rolling again after a big pause,” Rebecca Scott said.

Without the time to secure permission and permits to do a mural on the side of a building, the Revival House shipping container seemed to be the perfect way to bring some colour to the city and start business owners and local artists thinking about where and how additional murals could be painted in the years to come.

For the Revival House Mural, Claire Scott and Villalobos were asked to design something that fit the title, #LoveWins – one that Rebecca Scott and the BIA felt was fitting in a year when every member of the community has come together to support one another through the pandemic.

“The phrase #LoveWins is pretty self-explanatory,” Villalobos said Friday, alongside Claire Scott, as the pair took advantage of the unseasonably warm weather to get the mural as close to complete as possible. “We’ve tried to incorporate the idea of freedom and a combination of all the things we feel are attractive about Stratford and things that correspond with the experiences we’ve had over the years in Stratford.”


Stratford artists Claire Scott and Amparo Villalobos work on their #LoveWins mural as collaborator Kris Kleist captures their progress on camera in the rear parking lot at Revival House in Stratford Friday afternoon. (Galen Simmons/The Beacon Herald)

Though the artists submitted a basic design to the BIA depicting what they intended to paint, they said they were given a lot of freedom to explore their creativity and almost improvise the piece as they worked.

The result of that improvisational art is a symphony of colour and imagery, both recognizable and abstract, that immediately draws the eyes of passersby.

“We’re really just building upon layers and feeling the moment.  … It’s kind of this reflection to inspire artists to keep doing what they’re doing and symbolizing the appreciation for the spaces that we do have,” Claire Scott said.

Both the BIA and the artists hope this mural and those to come will help transform more of Stratford’s outdoor spaces into places where locals and visitors can congregate – once it’s safe to do so – to enjoy live events and music.

Claire Scott and Villalobos expect they will complete their mural by the end of this weekend. Those who pass by and like what they see are encouraged to snap a photo of the mural and share it on Instagram with #LoveWins.

gsimmons@postmedia.com

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