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The best time to buy an Apple iPhone? Right now

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Gimme! Gimme! Gimme! (Photo: Getty Images)

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Gimme! Gimme! Gimme! (Photo: Getty Images)

 

If you’re thinking about making the switch from Android to iPhone, or just need a smartphone upgrade, get ready: The best time to save money on an iPhone is…right now!

Apple recently announced the new iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro with the latest and greatest bells and whistles—including 5G wireless—you can put inside a smartphone. While the newest models start at just $699 for the Apple iPhone 12 Mini, the tech giant also dropped the price on previous models.

In fact, you can pre-order the Apple iPhone 12 for $800 (or $33.33 per month for 24 months) at Verizon. Want something bigger? Pre-order the Apple iPhone 12 Pro for $1,000 (was $41.66 per month for 24 months) at Verizon too. Both phones come out on October 23.

(Verizon Communications, Inc. is the parent company of Verizon Wireless and Yahoo Life.)

Once a year, Apple usually discounts older generations of the iPhone to clear inventory for the new generation. This year is no different with price drops on last year’s iPhone 11 ($599, was $699) and iPhone XR ($499, was $749). Not too shabby.

However, Apple quietly discontinued the 2019’s iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max altogether.

Meanwhile, retailers like Amazon are always selling new and renewed models of older iPhones. At the moment, you can get the Apple iPhone SE (64GB) for as little as $350. When it was released earlier this year in April, it cost $399—that’s a savings of $49.

So unless you just can’t survive without the very latest model, check out the best iPhone deals below:

Here are the best deals on previous models of the Apple iPhone:

Apple iPhone 8 Plus (64GB)—renewed, $332 (was $385), amazon.com
Apple iPhone 8 Plus (64GB)—renewed, $330 (was $386), amazon.com
Apple iPhone 8 Plus (64GB)—renewed, $320 (was $339), amazon.com
Apple iPhone 8 Plus (64GB)—renewed, $332 (was $385), amazon.com
Apple iPhone 7 Plus (128GB)—renewed, $290 (was $350), amazon.com
Apple iPhone 7 Plus (128GB)—renewed, $3090 (was $340), amazon.com
Apple iPhone 7 Plus (128GB)—renewed, $299 (was $315), amazon.com
Apple iPhone 7 (128GB)—renewed, $211 (was $229), amazon.com
Apple iPhone 7 (128GB)—renewed, $189 (was $400), amazon.com
Apple iPhone SE (64GB)—renewed, $350 (was $370), amazon.com
Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max (256GB) —renewed, $950 (was $1,260), amazon.com
Apple iPhone 11 (128GB)—renewed, $630 (was $850), amazon.com
Apple iPhone XS Max (64GB)—renewed, $530 (was $564), amazon.com
Apple iPhone XS (64GB)—renewed, $449 (was $484), amazon.com
Apple iPhone XS (64GB)—renewed, $440 (was $465), amazon.com
Apple iPhone XS (64GB)—Simple Mobile (pre-paid), $399 (was $600), amazon.com
Apple iPhone XR (64GB)—renewed, $384 (was $405), amazon.com
Apple iPhone X (64GB)—Simple Mobile (pre-paid), $502 (was $528), amazon.com
Apple iPhone X (64GB)—renewed, $380 (was $404), amazon.com

The reviews quoted above reflect the most recent versions at the time of publication.

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Review: PS5 is big and pricey, but boasts impressive speed and visual upgrades – Prince George Citizen

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Seven years after the release of the highly successful PlayStation 4, Sony has fired its latest salvo in the war to capture the hearts and minds of big-spending video game enthusiasts.

The PlayStation 5 launched Nov. 12, two days after archrival Microsoft debuted its new Xbox Series X and Series S units. The latest round of the console wars started with a bang, as both systems quickly sold out.

article continues below

Sony, however, is coming off a decisive victory in the last round of the battle. According to sales figures from Sony Interactive Entertainment, all versions of the PS4 combined have sold more than 113.5 millionunits as of Sept. 30, making it the second-highest selling home console behind the PlayStation 2.

In an effort to keep its edge in the video game arms race, Sony has released an expensive but powerful platform with a bold esthetic that breaks from past conservative design choices. While upgrading to Sony’s latest console will come at a cost — a unit that includes an Ultra-HD Blu-Ray drive has a recommended retail price of $629.99 while a digital-only version costs $499.99 — the improved experience will be difficult for dedicated gamers to pass up.

The increased processing power of the PS5 is seen through the quality of the graphics. Titles that have built from the ground up for the console, like the punishing action role-playing game “Demon’s Souls,” look stunning. The difference in visual quality will be more striking from gamers upgrading from a base PS4, which did not support 4K resolution, rather than the more recent PS4 Pro.

A notable part of the visual upgrade comes from the PS5’s use of ray tracing, an advanced rendering technique to realistically depict light and shadow. Until recently, ray tracing was considered too resource-intensive to use effectively in video-game development.

Games available at launch that support ray tracing include “Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales” and “Demon’s Souls.” Spider-Man’s bio-electrical powers provide a nice example of what the technology can do — and seem to come without a performance cost.

As impressive as the eye candy is, the speed of the PS5 is arguably a more noteworthy improvement over its predecessor. Load times are markedly faster for PS5 games; even games with massive maps and environments to handle like “Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla” have little downtime.

As a result of this extra processing power, the PS5 is a bit more unwieldy than its sleek precursor. The version of the PS5 with the Blu-Ray drive is 39 centimetres wide, 26 cm deep and 10.4 centimetres high, making it Sony’s largest console. The digital-only version is about a cenitmetre shorter. The units can be set horizontally or vertically to give some options, but it will take up a good chunk of your entertainment centre.

Sony is pivoting from the traditional all-black colour scheme to a two-toned black-and-white look. The PS5 also has a contoured design that sets it apart from the clean lines of the PS4. Whether the new look works or not is, of course, an exercise in subjectivity, but the PS5 is certainly bolder in appearance than its clinical counterpart.

The design choice is mirrored in the accessories available at launch, which include the DualSense wireless controller, a wireless headset, an HD camera, a controller charging station and a media remote control, for those who wish to use the PS5 as a launch point for their favourite streaming services.

The DualSense controller is a significant change from Sony’s long-running DualShock design. The controller has more heft to it and features cleaner lines in its construction. It features haptic feedback, which is intended to make instances in a game that cause the controller to vibrate feel more realistic. A nice feature is that the controller’s touchpad is now covered and resistant to the possibility of getting smudged with greasy fingerprints.

Most PS4 games are playable on the PS5, and are easily ported over with a USB drive. Saved games will have to be expressly moved over, either by removable drive or through the cloud service provided by the PS Plus service, which comes at an added cost.

PlayStation 4 controllers can be used, but only to play PS4 games. Those wanting to enjoy local multiplayer on a PS5 game will have to shell out for another DualSense controller, which costs about $90.

Staying on the leading edge of console gaming will always tax an entertainment budget, and upgrading to a PS5 is no different.

A PlayStation 5 console was provided for review purposes.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 30, 2020.

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Review: PS5 is big and pricey, but boasts impressive speed and visual upgrades – The Battlefords News-Optimist

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Seven years after the release of the highly successful PlayStation 4, Sony has fired its latest salvo in the war to capture the hearts and minds of big-spending video game enthusiasts.

The PlayStation 5 launched Nov. 12, two days after archrival Microsoft debuted its new Xbox Series X and Series S units. The latest round of the console wars started with a bang, as both systems quickly sold out.

article continues below

Sony, however, is coming off a decisive victory in the last round of the battle. According to sales figures from Sony Interactive Entertainment, all versions of the PS4 combined have sold more than 113.5 millionunits as of Sept. 30, making it the second-highest selling home console behind the PlayStation 2.

In an effort to keep its edge in the video game arms race, Sony has released an expensive but powerful platform with a bold esthetic that breaks from past conservative design choices. While upgrading to Sony’s latest console will come at a cost — a unit that includes an Ultra-HD Blu-Ray drive has a recommended retail price of $629.99 while a digital-only version costs $499.99 — the improved experience will be difficult for dedicated gamers to pass up.

The increased processing power of the PS5 is seen through the quality of the graphics. Titles that have built from the ground up for the console, like the punishing action role-playing game “Demon’s Souls,” look stunning. The difference in visual quality will be more striking from gamers upgrading from a base PS4, which did not support 4K resolution, rather than the more recent PS4 Pro.

A notable part of the visual upgrade comes from the PS5’s use of ray tracing, an advanced rendering technique to realistically depict light and shadow. Until recently, ray tracing was considered too resource-intensive to use effectively in video-game development.

Games available at launch that support ray tracing include “Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales” and “Demon’s Souls.” Spider-Man’s bio-electrical powers provide a nice example of what the technology can do — and seem to come without a performance cost.

As impressive as the eye candy is, the speed of the PS5 is arguably a more noteworthy improvement over its predecessor. Load times are markedly faster for PS5 games; even games with massive maps and environments to handle like “Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla” have little downtime.

As a result of this extra processing power, the PS5 is a bit more unwieldy than its sleek precursor. The version of the PS5 with the Blu-Ray drive is 39 centimetres wide, 26 cm deep and 10.4 centimetres high, making it Sony’s largest console. The digital-only version is about a cenitmetre shorter. The units can be set horizontally or vertically to give some options, but it will take up a good chunk of your entertainment centre.

Sony is pivoting from the traditional all-black colour scheme to a two-toned black-and-white look. The PS5 also has a contoured design that sets it apart from the clean lines of the PS4. Whether the new look works or not is, of course, an exercise in subjectivity, but the PS5 is certainly bolder in appearance than its clinical counterpart.

The design choice is mirrored in the accessories available at launch, which include the DualSense wireless controller, a wireless headset, an HD camera, a controller charging station and a media remote control, for those who wish to use the PS5 as a launch point for their favourite streaming services.

The DualSense controller is a significant change from Sony’s long-running DualShock design. The controller has more heft to it and features cleaner lines in its construction. It features haptic feedback, which is intended to make instances in a game that cause the controller to vibrate feel more realistic. A nice feature is that the controller’s touchpad is now covered and resistant to the possibility of getting smudged with greasy fingerprints.

Most PS4 games are playable on the PS5, and are easily ported over with a USB drive. Saved games will have to be expressly moved over, either by removable drive or through the cloud service provided by the PS Plus service, which comes at an added cost.

PlayStation 4 controllers can be used, but only to play PS4 games. Those wanting to enjoy local multiplayer on a PS5 game will have to shell out for another DualSense controller, which costs about $90.

Staying on the leading edge of console gaming will always tax an entertainment budget, and upgrading to a PS5 is no different.

A PlayStation 5 console was provided for review purposes.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 30, 2020.

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PlayStation 5: Man forced to sell his PS5 after wife discovers it's not an air purifier – GIVEMESPORT

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With all the buzz surrounding the release of the PlayStation 5, it’s been hard to get hold of the console – let alone pick one up for a discount.

However, a hilarious situation in Taiwan saw one gamer pick up a cheap console after the seller told his wife it was an “air purifier”. 

Reportedly, the unfortunate Taiwanese gamer picked up a PS5 and believed the only way to have it in the house without objection was to tell his other half it was an air purifier. 

Had it been a PlayStation 3 or 4, this story might have gone down better thanks to the over-active fans on both consoles, but Sony’s latest offering is a much quieter machine… although, it certainly does look like an air purifier.

The story – which first appeared on Facebook – explained that buyer Jin Wu arranged to meet his console seller over the phone. 

Two things raised his suspicions – firstly, a female voice that he said ‘did not sound like a gamer’ and secondly, the console was cheaper than the others he found online.

Jin Wu explained: “When the seller arrived, it turned out to be a middle-aged man. You could tell that he definitely played video games, just with a single look.

“Where did you buy this console?” Wu asked.

“Pchome,” the man replied, referencing a major Taiwanese online marketplace. 

“Oh, you’re really quick at reserving the console,” Wu replied. “Did you manage to reserve two consoles? If not, why are you selling this?”

Then things got really sad, really fast. 

“It’s my wife who wants to sell it,” said the unwilling console salesman. 

Wu says that he went quiet at this point, a little taken aback by the pain in the man’s eyes, before the surprising and hilarious punchline was finally revealed.

The seller said: “Seems like women can still tell the difference between a PS5 console and an air purifier.”

We’re not 100% sure if we believe Jin Wu that this really happened, but if it did, it’s absolutely hilarious.

We’ll accept it for now, with a huge pinch of salt and a good laugh.


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