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The first PlayStation 5 teardown reveals some hardware secrets – Ars Technica

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We’re still a bit over a month away from the official launch of the PlayStation 5, but we’ve already got the first public teardown of the console hardware courtesy of Sony itself.

The Japanese video (with English subtitles) Sony posted Wednesday morning answers quite a few nagging questions left from previous announcements and recent hands-on time from some Japanese press.

Chief among them is a demonstration of how the system’s circular black stand works. When the PS5 is placed vertically, the stand is held in place with a single large screw. When that screw is removed, it can be stored in a compartment in the base, and a small cap fills in the screw hole in the system itself.

PS5 owners will use the same base when placing the PS5 horizontally, seemingly to give a flat surface for the system’s gentle curves to rest on. In this configuration, though, the base simply snaps into place along a set of marks on one of those white panels, no screw required.

Speaking of those white panels, the teardown video shows that they can be popped off easily without tools. Just “lift the back corner and slide it off,” as the video explains it. With the white panels off, users get easy access to the outside of the system’s cooling fan, which draws in air from both sides of the system through two long side vents on the front and a rear vent that runs the entire length of the system.

The inner shell also features two “dust catcher” holes that can be easily vacuumed out, according to Sony. That should be welcome news for PS4 owners who have gotten used to tearing open the system and blasting it with canned air to remove system-clogging dust.

Listing image by Sony / Youtube

Removing the outer panels also gives access to the system’s PCIe storage expansion slot. You’ll need a screwdriver to remove the small panel that protects this slot, but otherwise it seems relatively easy to access, especially compared to the internal storage on previous PlayStation consoles. The system’s 825GB of built-in high-speed storage is contained on a separate custom-controlled chip directly on the motherboard, though.

Because the system CPU runs at a “very high clock speed,” Sony says a new liquid metal thermal conductor was needed to “ensure long-term stable high-cooling performance.” Along those same lines, the system’s massive heat sink uses a heat pipe which Sony says has a “shape and airflow [which] make it possible to achieve the same performance as a vapor chamber.” That’s talking point is likely a direct reference to the Xbox Series X, which uses an actual vapor chamber for its cooling system.

A few other interesting tidbits revealed in the teardown:

  • The system sports four USB ports, one of which is a Type-C connection and the rest the older, rectangular Type-A standard. Of the Type A ports, the two on the rear provide USB 3.1 “SuperSpeed” 10Gbps connections, while the one on the front is a USB 2.0 “Hi-Speed” connection of just 480Mbps.
  • The system’s Ultra HD Blu-ray drive is self-contained unit that looks to be easily removable and replaceable, with “two layers of insulation to reduce drive noise when the discs spin,” Sony says.
  • Sony says the increased size of the PS5 over the PS4 allows for “a dramatic improvement in terms of processing power and quietness.”
  • The PS5 power supply draws 350W of power.
  • The PS5 makes use of Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth 5.1 for its wireless connections.

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Nokia and NASA to build moon's first cellular network – Siliconrepublic.com

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Nokia Bell Labs’ 4G LTE communications technology will help NASA advance its mission to land more people on the moon.

NASA has announced that Nokia will build the first ever cellular network on the moon. The Finnish company was selected as a partner for the space agency’s Tipping Point programme, which funds technologies at the cutting edge of space exploration.

The network will use 4G LTE – the precursor to 5G – technology on the moon’s surface. Nokia said it will transform lunar communications by delivering “reliable, high data rates while containing power, size and cost”.

Improved communications infrastructure on the moon is an aspect of NASA’s Artemis programme, which aims to land the first woman and the next man on the moon by 2024 and to establish a sustainable presence on its surface by the end of the decade. NASA said that Nokia’s system could “support lunar surface communications at greater distances, increased speeds, and provide more reliability than current standards”.

The LTE tech will be developed by Nokia Bell Labs. Partnering with spaceflight firm Intuitive Machines, the research company will build and deploy an “ultra-compact, low-power, space-hardened, end-to-end solution” on the moon’s surface in late 2022. The system will self-configure after deployment.

Its purpose will be “critical communication capabilities” for transmitting data, Nokia said. This will include command and control functions, remote control of lunar rovers, real-time navigation and streaming high-definition video.

It will also give astronauts wireless connectivity for voice and video communications, biometric data exchange and more, which are vital for “long-term human presence” on the moon.

Nokia CTO and president at Nokia Bell Labs, Marcus Weldon, said the system has been built on the company’s “rich and successful history in space technologies, from pioneering satellite communication to discovering the cosmic microwave background radiation produced by the big bang”.

The technology has been specially designed to withstand the harsh conditions of launch and landing on the moon, Nokia said, and to function in the extreme conditions of space. The company added that it plans to further commercialise its LTE product and investigate how 5G can be applied to space-exploration technologies.

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First iPad Air 4 Unboxing Video Shared Online – MacRumors

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The first unboxing video of the fourth-generation iPad Air has been shared online. The short video offers the first in-person look at the iPad Air‘s new Sky Blue color, packaging, and Touch ID in the power button.

Other than some demo videos from a Chinese media event last month, this unboxing video appears to be the first of its kind, ahead of more detailed unboxings and reviews expected from the press this week.

The new ‌iPad Air‌ features a 10.9-inch ‌edge-to-edge display, the A14 Bionic chip, Apple Pencil 2 support, and a range of color options including Silver, Space Gray, Rose Gold, Green, and Sky Blue.

Pre-orders of the fourth-generation ‌iPad Air‌ began on Friday, 16 October, and the first shipments are set to arrive on Friday, 23 October.

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Health Canada Urges B.C. Residents to Download COVID Alert App as Province Drags Feet – iPhone in Canada

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Health Canada is urging residents in British Columbia to download Canada’s COVID Alert app, as the province drags its feet to support the exposure notification app.

According to the Vancouver Sun, Health Canada told Postmedia News the COVID Alert app is still useful to have, despite the latter has not been officially supported yet in B.C.

“The COVID Alert app is free and voluntary, and is another tool to help limit the spread of COVID-19 and prevent future outbreaks,” said Health Canada spokesperson Maryse Durette, to Postmedia News.

“At all levels of uptake, COVID Alert can help reduce transmission. The more people who use the app the more effective it will be,” added Durette.

B.C. and the federal government are still in talks about the roll out of COVID Alert, added Health Canada. Alberta, the Yukon Territory, Northwest Territories and Nunavut have also not officially adopted COVID Alert yet.

Durette said, “It’s still helpful to download COVID Alert from anywhere in the country, even if you can’t use it to report a diagnosis. That way, you’ll be notified if you come into contact with someone from a reporting province or territory or when people in your area are able to report a diagnosis.”

The B.C. Ministry of Health told Postmedia last week it was working with the federal government to get COVID Alert app active in the province. Clearly, B.C. is not working fast enough when other provinces have been able to support COVID Alert in a shorter timeframe.

Canada’s COVID Alert app is based on Google and Apple’s exposure notification framework, which leverages Bluetooth on devices for anonymous “handshakes” in the background. The app does not use GPS info or collect any user data. It has been vetted as safe by Canada’s privacy commissioner and provincial counterparts.

When someone tests positive for COVID-19, they can anonymously alert others that may have been in contact using COVID Alert, by obtaining a one-time use from their provincial health authority.

Provinces currently supporting COVID Alert:

  • Manitoba
  • New Brunswick
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Ontario
  • Quebec
  • Saskatchewan
  • Nova Scotia
  • Prince Edward Island

Still waiting for:

  • Alberta
  • British Columbia
  • Northwest Territories
  • Nunavut
  • Yukon

The federal government of Canada recently acknowledged there was a bug within iOS that affected the COVID Alert app, and urged Canadians to update to iOS 14.0.1 to resolve the issue.

Since October 15, COVID Alert has been download downloaded over 4.5 million times, with 1,696 one-time keys issued.

Download links: 

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