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The Hubble Space Telescope Spotted Impossible Quasar Tsunamis – Dual Dove

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Researchers utilizing the Hubble Space Telescope have spotted recently quite the unthinkable. Quasars transmitting outbursts of energy have been discovered running through their galaxies. The Space Telescope Science Institute had teamed up with the researchers from the Virginia Tech and realized the recent discovery.

They reported three of the most energetic quasar tsunamis ever detected. Those outbursts not only represent a challenge for scientists, but they also bring vital information to theorists. It has been long known the scientists’ work of trying to comprehend how those outflows form and accelerate. As for theorists, they sought to understand what forces are driving galaxy development.

The Hubble Space Telescope Offers Glimpses Into Quasar Outbursts

The team’s observations noted that the outbursts are 100 times more kinetic energy than the entire output of the Milky Way galaxy. Quasars are recognized as profoundly lightened galactic cores, which researchers believe circle the supermassive black holes.

The black holes don’t discharge the radiation directly, but the radiation occurs when the black hole’s gravity interacts wit the matter close to it. The outbursts from quasars are nothing like that. They resemble some spheres of energy extending outward at a wide length per second.

Utilizing the Hubble Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (measures the spectra or the wavelengths of radiation), the researchers measure 13 quasar outbursts. The spectra indicated them which elements are contained in the outflows, and the velocity and temperature, as well. The measurements of only one outburst’s acceleration, for example, is from 19,000 km/s to 20,500 km/s, approximately 42,5 million to 46 million miles/hour.

“Putting the observed outflows into our simulations solve these outstanding problems in the galactic evolution,” stated Jeremiah P. Ostriker, a cosmologist from the Columbia University. The team has published information on the research in a bunch of papers in The Astrophysical Journal Supplements.


Ethelene is the main editor on DualDove, she likes to write on the latest science news.

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Uranus is losing its atmosphere because of its weird wobbly magnetic field – Yahoo Tech

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Voyager 2 may have long ago left our solar system and headed out into interstellar space to explore the unknown, but scientists are still learning from the data it collected as it passed by the other planets in our system. A new analysis of 30-year-old data has revealed a surprising finding about the planet Uranus — the huge magnetic bubble surrounding it is siphoning its atmosphere off into space.” data-reactid=”12″>Voyager 2 may have long ago left our solar system and headed out into interstellar space to explore the unknown, but scientists are still learning from the data it collected as it passed by the other planets in our system. A new analysis of 30-year-old data has revealed a surprising finding about the planet Uranus — the huge magnetic bubble surrounding it is siphoning its atmosphere off into space.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Atmospheres being lost into space can have a profound effect on the development of a planet. As an example, Mars is thought to have started out as an ocean-covered planet similar to Earth but lost its atmosphere over time. “Mars used to be a wet planet with a thick atmosphere,” Gina DiBraccio, space physicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and project scientist for the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN mission, said in a statement. “It evolved over time to become the dry planet we see today.”” data-reactid=”13″>Atmospheres being lost into space can have a profound effect on the development of a planet. As an example, Mars is thought to have started out as an ocean-covered planet similar to Earth but lost its atmosphere over time. “Mars used to be a wet planet with a thick atmosphere,” Gina DiBraccio, space physicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and project scientist for the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN mission, said in a statement. “It evolved over time to become the dry planet we see today.”

Uranus’s atmospheric loss is driven by its strange magnetic field, the axis of which points at an angle compared to the axis on which the planet spins. That means its magnetosphere wobbles as it moves, which makes it very difficult to model. “The structure, the way that it moves,” DiBraccio said, “Uranus is really on its own.”

Voyager 2 took this image as it approached the planet Uranus on Jan. 14, 1986. The planet's hazy bluish color is due to the methane in its atmosphere, which absorbs red wavelengths of light.
<figcaption class="C($c-fuji-grey-h) Fz(13px) Py(5px) Lh(1.5)" title="Voyager 2 took this image as it approached the planet Uranus on Jan. 14, 1986. The planet’s hazy bluish color is due to the methane in its atmosphere, which absorbs red wavelengths of light. NASA/JPL-Caltech” data-reactid=”22″>

Voyager 2 took this image as it approached the planet Uranus on Jan. 14, 1986. The planet’s hazy bluish color is due to the methane in its atmosphere, which absorbs red wavelengths of light. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Due to the wobbling of the magnetosphere, bits of the atmosphere are drained away in what are called plasmoids — bubbles of plasma which pinch off from the magnetic field as it is blown around by the Sun. Although these plasmoids have been seen on Earth and on some other planets, they had never been observed on Uranus before the recent analysis of old Voyager 2 data.

“Imagine if one spacecraft just flew through this room and tried to characterize the entire Earth,” DiBraccio said. “Obviously it’s not going to show you anything about what the Sahara or Antarctica is like.”

“It’s why I love planetary science,” DiBraccio said. “You’re always going somewhere you don’t really know.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The research is published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.” data-reactid=”29″>The research is published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

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Sunlit Peaks in the Himalayas – NASA

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As the International Space Station (ISS) was traveling over India towards the day-night terminator, an astronaut shot this photograph of Earth’s third-highest summit, Kangchenjunga, and its surrounding peaks warmly lit by the setting Sun. With the Sun low in the sky, the light was passing through more atmosphere, which scatters it towards the red end of the visible spectrum.

Kangchenjunga rises more than 8500 meters (28,000 feet) above sea level. It stands on the border of Nepal and India about 120 kilometers (75 miles) east-southeast of Mount Everest. The apex of Kangchenjunga is surrounded by valley glaciers, some of which (like Yalung) are discernable in the shadows of this image. Just out of reach of the Sun’s rays, a deck of low-lying clouds lingers over the valley floors.

Thirteen other mountain peaks on Earth rise higher than 8000 meters (26,000 feet). These are known by mountaineers and climbers as the “eight-thousanders.” Oblique views such as this one give the dauntingly dangerous terrain a three-dimensional appearance and depth.

Astronaut photograph ISS061-E-92131 was acquired on December 16, 2019, with a Nikon D5 digital camera using a 500 millimeter lens and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations Facility and the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by a member of the Expedition 61 crew. The image has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast, and lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory as part of the ISS National Lab to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by Andrew Britton, Jacobs, JETS Contract at NASA-JSC.

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Uransus is losing its atmosphere because of its weird wobbly magnetic field – Digital Trends

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Voyager 2 may have long ago left our solar system and headed out into interstellar space to explore the unknown, but scientists are still learning from the data it collected as it passed by the other planets in our system. A new analysis of 30-year-old data has revealed a surprising finding about the planet Uranus — the huge magnetic bubble surrounding it is siphoning its atmosphere off into space.

Atmospheres being lost into space can have a profound effect on the development of a planet. As an example, Mars is thought to have started out as an ocean-covered planet similar to Earth but lost its atmosphere over time. “Mars used to be a wet planet with a thick atmosphere,” Gina DiBraccio, space physicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and project scientist for the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN mission, said in a statement. “It evolved over time to become the dry planet we see today.”

Uranus’s atmospheric loss is driven by its strange magnetic field, the axis of which points at an angle compared to the axis on which the planet spins. That means its magnetosphere wobbles as it moves, which makes it very difficult to model. “The structure, the way that it moves,” DiBraccio said, “Uranus is really on its own.”

Voyager 2 took this image as it approached the planet Uranus on Jan. 14, 1986. The planet’s hazy bluish color is due to the methane in its atmosphere, which absorbs red wavelengths of light. NASA/JPL-Caltech

Due to the wobbling of the magnetosphere, bits of the atmosphere are drained away in what are called plasmoids — bubbles of plasma which pinch off from the magnetic field as it is blown around by the Sun. Although these plasmoids have been seen on Earth and on some other planets, they had never been observed on Uranus before the recent analysis of old Voyager 2 data.

“Imagine if one spacecraft just flew through this room and tried to characterize the entire Earth,” DiBraccio said. “Obviously it’s not going to show you anything about what the Sahara or Antarctica is like.”

“It’s why I love planetary science,” DiBraccio said. “You’re always going somewhere you don’t really know.”

The research is published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

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