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The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 – The Battlefords News-Optimist

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The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada (all times eastern):

7:45 p.m.

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Yukon is reporting five new cases of COVID-19, bringing the total number of active infections to 65.

Acting chief medical health officer Dr. Catherine Elliott says in a statement that two of the new cases are in rural communities while locations for the others are still being identified.

She says the territory has seen 527 cases since March 22, 2020, with 458 of them being since June this year.

There have been a total of six deaths related to COVID-19 with four recorded over the past two months.

6:15 p.m.

Alberta is reporting 69 new COVID-19 cases today and two additional deaths.

The province now has 606 active cases.

Ninety-eight of those people are in hospital, with 27 of those patients being treated in intensive care units.

There has been a total of 2,318 deaths in Alberta due to the disease.

6 p.m.

British Columbia has reached a new vaccination milestone, with 80 per cent of eligible people aged 12 and over getting their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Just over 54 per cent of people in that group have been fully immunized.

The province is reporting 76 new cases of the virus, and there are 692 active cases, with 12 people in intensive care.

Nearly 147,000 people who tested positive for COVID-19 have recovered.

5:55 p.m.

Saskatchewan is reporting 22 new cases of COVID-19 today, and no new deaths.

After 42 more people have recovered, the province has 242 active cases.

The province is also reporting 55 people in hospital, including 10 in intensive care.

The seven-day average of new COVID-19 cases in the province has dropped to 25, its lowest mark since Oct. 12, 2020.

Provincewide, 74 per cent of those aged 12 and older have now received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

Of those 12 and older, 59 per cent are fully vaccinated.

1:55 p.m.

Manitoba is reporting 36 new COVID-19 cases.

The five-day test-positivity rate stands at 3.6 per cent provincially and 3.2 per cent in Winnipeg.

12 p.m.

The federal government is seeking to assure Canadians who mixed and matched vaccines that they will not have a problem crossing borders.

Canadian health authorities have allowed mixing and matching but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been reluctant to sanction the practice, saying it should only be done in “exceptional situations.”

The different view raises questions about how easily Canadians who mixed and matched will be able to cross into the United States once it opens its land borders to its northern neighbour.

Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc says he believes data sharing and conversations between nations will lead to an “evolution” and “adjustment” of the more conservative approach of some countries.

11:50 a.m.

New Brunswick is reporting no new cases of COVID-19 today.

Health officials say there are seven active cases in the province and no one is hospitalized with the disease.

Officials say about 59.7 per cent of New Brunswickers aged 12 and older are fully vaccinated and 80.7 per cent have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

11:45 a.m.

Health officials say Prince Edward Island is free of COVID-19.

Officials are reporting no active cases on the Island.

Chief medical officer of health Dr. Heather Morrison says the last new case of COVID-19 was reported June 30.

She says more than 191,000 applications have been received for a P.E.I. Pass, which allows people travel to the Island, adding that 46 per cent of applications are from Atlantic Canadians.

11 a.m.

Quebec is reporting 76 new cases of COVID-19 today and no additional deaths attributed to the novel coronavirus.

The Health Department says hospitalizations dropped by one, to 77, and 21 people were in intensive care, a drop of two.

Authorities say 82,153 doses of vaccine were administered Monday, and Quebec’s public health institute says 83 per cent of residents over 12 have received at least one dose of vaccine and 56.1 per cent are adequately vaccinated.

The institute says there have been no reported deaths linked to the novel coronavirus in the province since July 15.

10 a.m.

The Nunavut government says Iqaluit’s COVID-19 outbreak is officially over after nearly a month with no new cases.

It has been 28 consecutive days without cases, which meets the threshold for the outbreak to be declared over.

Iqaluit’s first case of the pandemic was reported on April 15 and swelled to 253 cases in the northern city of about 8,000 people.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 20, 2021.

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Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world Tuesday – CBC.ca

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The latest:

Chinese authorities have announced mass coronavirus testing in Wuhan as an unusually wide series of COVID-19 outbreaks reached the city where the disease was first detected in late 2019.

The provincial capital of 11 million people in central China is the latest city to undergo city-wide testing. Three cases were confirmed in Wuhan on Monday, its first non-imported cases in more than a year.

China has largely curbed COVID-19 at home after the initial outbreak that devastated Wuhan and spread globally. Since then, authorities have tamped down and controlled the disease whenever it pops up with quick lockdowns and mass testing.

The current outbreaks are still in the hundreds of cases in total but have spread much more widely than previous ones. Many of the cases have been identified as the highly contagious delta variant.

The National Health Commission said Tuesday that 90 new cases had been confirmed the previous day.

-From The Associated Press, last updated at 7:05 a.m. ET


What’s happening in Canada

WATCH | Renewed concern over rising COVID-19 cases, delta variant: 

Despite Canada having one of the highest vaccination rates in the world, that might not be enough to slow the spread of COVID-19 driven by the highly contagious delta variant. 2:34


What’s happening around the world

A visitor submits her documents at the reception to receive a shot of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo on Monday. (Stanislav Kogiku/The Associated Press)

As of early Tuesday morning, more than 198.9 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported, according to Johns Hopkins University. The reported global death toll stood at more than 4.2 million.

In the Asia-Pacific region, Japan will focus on hospitalizing patients who are seriously ill with COVID-19 and those at risk of becoming so while others isolate at home amid worries about a strained medical system as cases surge in Olympics host city Tokyo.

Pakistan’s top health official says his country for the first time has administered one million doses of COVID-19 vaccine across the country in the past 24 hours. The latest development comes days after Pakistan imposed a lockdown in the southern port city of Karachi and in other high-risk areas.

In the Americas, the U.S. states of Florida and Louisiana were at or near their highest hospitalization numbers of the coronavirus pandemic on Monday, a trend driven by the still-spreading delta variant.

Nearly three out of four Americans above the age of 18 have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine as of Monday, according to the U.S. Centers for Disesae Control.

In Africa, Morocco will lengthen its night curfew as it tightens restrictions to counter a surge in infections.

In the Middle East, Iran on Monday reported 37,189 new cases of COVID-19 — a single-day high, according to Johns Hopkins University’s COVID-19 tracker. The country, which has been hit hard by several waves of the novel coronavirus, also saw 411 additional deaths.

In Europe, France’s overseas territory of Guadeloupe will to go into a new lockdown for at least three weeks.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he wanted to get the travel industry moving again with a simple user-friendly system to allow for trips abroad without importing new virus variants.

From The Associated Press, Reuters and CBC News, last updated at 6:55 a.m. ET

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Canada fines travellers for fake vaccination and testing papers – BBC News

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A Covid screening centre at the Vancouver airport

Getty Images

Canada has fined two travellers arriving from the US who, officials say, forged Covid-19 testing and vaccination documents.

Each was fined C$19,720 ($16,000, £11,500) after inspectors at the Toronto airport found their vaccine cards and proof of testing were fake.

It comes as Canada is set to ease travel restrictions on US visitors.

Around the world, nations are grappling with how to re-open their borders to travellers amid a virus surge.

According to a statement from the Public Health Agency of Canada, the two unnamed travellers had entered Canada from the US during the week of 18 July.

The Canada Border Services Agency, which inspects Covid travel documents for authenticity, determined that the duo had faked the documents that they had uploaded to the government’s ArriveCAN travel website.

“The Government of Canada will continue to investigate incidents reported and will not hesitate to take enforcement action where it is warranted to protect the health of Canadians from the further spread of Covid-19 and its variants of concern,” the agency said in a statement.

Canada did not identify the travellers or their itineraries. The health agency told Newsweek in a statement that they were Canadian citizens.

Canada loosened requirements for international travellers on 5 July. Anyone entering the country must provide proof of vaccination. The unvaccinated have to submit to multiple tests, and stay for three days in a government-run hotel before quarantining for 14 days.

Canada will begin letting vaccinated Americans enter the country starting on 9 August.

The US border with Canada and Mexico, however, remains closed to foreigners until 21 August.

Other countries are quickly amending their travel restrictions, depending on the rise or fall of new infections and vaccinations.

On Monday, the UK began allowing vaccinated Americans and Europeans to enter without undergoing quarantine.

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US Customs agents arrest Canadian woman attempting to smuggle drugs – CTV Toronto

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CALGARY —
A Canadian woman has been caught attempting to import a significant quantity of cocaine into the country, U.S. border agents report.

The suspect, who was driving a commercial truck loaded with watermelons and peppers, attempted to cross into Canada at the office in Sweetgrass, Mont. on July 29.

Upon further inspection of the truck, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers discovered a number of bags hidden among the cargo.

The substance inside the bags tested positive for cocaine, officials said. The total amount of drugs seized was 31.5 kilograms.

“Utilizing high-tech tools, our frontline CBP Officers used a combination of their training and experience to detect and seize 69.5 pounds of cocaine in the cargo environment,” said area port director Jason Greene, Sweetgrass Port of Entry, in a release.

“The ability to facilitate lawful trade and travel while sustaining a focus on enforcement, is critical to our border security mission.”

Charges are pending against the suspect, who has not been identified.

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