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The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Monday, Mar. 29, 2021 – OrilliaMatters

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The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 4:00 a.m. ET on Monday March 29, 2021.

There are 965,404 confirmed cases in Canada.

<b>_ Canada: 965,404 confirmed cases (43,590 active, 898,934 resolved, 22,880 deaths).<sup>*</sup>The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.</b>

There were 4,321 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 114.69 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 30,466 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 4,352.

There were 28 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 204 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 29. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 60.2 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 27,346,309 tests completed.

<b>_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 1,016 confirmed cases (six active, 1,004 resolved, six deaths).</b>

There was one new case Sunday. The rate of active cases is 1.15 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been two new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 1.15 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 218,755 tests completed.

<b>_ Prince Edward Island: 156 confirmed cases (12 active, 144 resolved, zero deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 7.52 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of eight new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is one.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people. 

There have been 123,708 tests completed.

<b>_ Nova Scotia: 1,711 confirmed cases (25 active, 1,620 resolved, 66 deaths).</b>

There were two new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 2.55 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 23 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is three.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.74 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 414,886 tests completed.

<b>_ New Brunswick: 1,577 confirmed cases (115 active, 1,432 resolved, 30 deaths).</b>

There were six new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 14.72 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 87 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 12.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 3.84 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 260,514 tests completed.

<b>_ Quebec: 308,311 confirmed cases (7,837 active, 289,827 resolved, 10,647 deaths).</b>

There were 917 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 91.4 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 5,972 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 853.

There were two new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 48 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is seven. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 124.17 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 7,036,923 tests completed.

<b>_ Ontario: 343,140 confirmed cases (18,405 active, 317,408 resolved, 7,327 deaths).</b>

There were 2,448 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 124.92 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 14,266 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 2,038.

There were 19 new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 86 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 12. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 49.73 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 12,226,419 tests completed.

<b>_ Manitoba: 33,922 confirmed cases (1,179 active, 31,809 resolved, 934 deaths).</b>

There were 55 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 85.48 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 570 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 81.

There was one new reported death Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of seven new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is one. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.07 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 67.72 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 581,892 tests completed.

<b>_ Saskatchewan: 33,031 confirmed cases (1,950 active, 30,648 resolved, 433 deaths).</b>

There were 248 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 165.44 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,394 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 199.

There were three new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 15 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is two. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.18 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 36.74 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 651,440 tests completed.

<b>_ Alberta: 146,340 confirmed cases (7,698 active, 136,659 resolved, 1,983 deaths).</b>

There were 644 new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 174.09 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 4,406 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 629.

There were three new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 20 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is three. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 44.85 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 3,654,483 tests completed.

<b>_ British Columbia: 95,677 confirmed cases (6,362 active, 87,866 resolved, 1,449 deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 123.59 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,737 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 534.

There were zero new reported deaths Sunday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 28 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.08 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 28.15 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 2,143,116 tests completed.

<b>_ Yukon: 73 confirmed cases (one active, 71 resolved, one deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Sunday. The rate of active cases is 2.38 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.38 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 8,487 tests completed.

<b>_ Northwest Territories: 42 confirmed cases (zero active, 42 resolved, zero deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Sunday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people. 

There have been 15,825 tests completed.

<b>_ Nunavut: 395 confirmed cases (zero active, 391 resolved, four deaths).</b>

There were zero new cases Sunday. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 10.16 per 100,000 people. 

There have been 9,785 tests completed.

This report was automatically generated by The Canadian Press Digital Data Desk and was first published March 29, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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Get the flu shot: Public Health – Quinte News

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Local public health officials says getting the flu shot this year is especially important to reduce the risk of illness during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Since many people are vulnerable to serious risks related to the flu, officials say everyone can help reduce the spread by getting vaccinated.

In a release, Hastings Prince Edward Public Health points out that it’s safe to get the flu vaccine at the same time as, or any time before or after the COVID-19 vaccine.

They point out influenza can be a serious disease and can lead to pneumonia or organ failure.

Statement from Hastings Prince Edward Public Health:

Getting the flu vaccine is especially important this year, to reduce your risk of illness during the COVID-19 pandemic. As many people are vulnerable to serious risks related to the flu, everyone can help reduce the spread by getting vaccinated. Your choice to get vaccinated will also help ensure critical health care resources are available to those who need them most. It’s safe to get the flu vaccine at the same time as, or any time before or after the COVID-19 vaccine, so do not delay – protect yourself with these important vaccines today!

Influenza is not caused by the viruses that cause COVID-19 or a cold. It can be a serious disease that causes some individuals to be in bed for a week or longer. It can also lead to complications such as pneumonia or organ failure. Vaccinated individuals are less likely to have severe complications and end up in the hospital – which will help ensure health care resources are available to those who need them most.

This year, residents are encouraged to seek their flu vaccination as soon as possible through their health care provider or a pharmacy. As public health resources continue to be redeployed to the COVID-19 pandemic, HPEPH is not able to offer community flu clinics to the general public this year. However, flu vaccination remains the best way to protect yourself and those you love from serious illness and complications. Getting your flu vaccine early is the best way to protect yourself from the flu, as it can take up to two weeks to build immunity. The vaccine is available to individuals over 2 years of age at local pharmacies, and everyone over 6 months of age can receive the flu vaccination from their health care provider. HPEPH is considering the feasibility of offering small flu vaccination clinics to populations who are unable to receive the vaccine through these avenues, but any such clinics are dependant on the rollout of COVID-19 vaccination and local case rates, as resources continue to be required for COVID-19 case and contact management.

“You got your COVID-19 vaccine – now it’s time to protect yourself, and those you love, from the flu,” says Dr. Ethan Toumishey, Acting Medical Officer of Health at HPEPH. “The COVID-19 vaccine has shown us how important and effective vaccines can be at reducing the severity of illness. While the COVID-19 vaccine reduces your risk of complications from COVID-19, it won’t protect you from the flu.”

To reduce the spread of illness in the community, all residents should continue public health precautions. The same measures that are helping control the spread of COVID-19 will help reduce the spread of seasonal influenza. If you have symptoms of the flu, stay home and follow testing guidance for COVID-19. Even if you are vaccinated against both the flu and COVID-19, you can still get a mild case of these illnesses and spread them to others. The same public health precautions that prevent the spread of COVID-19, will prevent the spread of the flu.

  • Stay home when you are sick
  • Get tested for COVID-19 (if advised by screening)
  • Wash your hands often
  • Cover your cough and sneeze
  • Clean frequently touched surfaces often
  • Get vaccinated.

For more information, visit https://www.ontario.ca/page/flu-facts

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Canada signs deal with Pfizer for millions of pediatric COVID-19 vaccine doses- PM Trudeau

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Canada has signed a deal with  Pfizer Inc to receive 2.9 million doses of their pediatric COVID-19 vaccine shortly after it is approved for use by Health Canada, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Thursday.

“We will be receiving enough doses in Canada to ensure that all children in Canada, aged five to 11, can receive the vaccine,” said Trudeau. The vaccine is currently being reviewed by Health Canada.

 

(Reporting by Julie Gordon in Ottawa, Editing by Franklin Paul)

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Canada government, provinces agree COVID-19 vaccine travel passport – officials

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Canada’s federal government and the 10 provinces have agreed on a standard COVID-19 electronic vaccination passport allowing domestic and foreign travel, government officials told reporters on Thursday.

The deal prevents possible confusion that could be caused if each of the provinces – which have primary responsibility for health care – issued their own unique certificates. The officials spoke on the condition they not be identified.

The document will have a federal Canadian identifying mark and meets major international smart health card standards.

“Many (countries) have said they want to see a digital … verifiable proof of vaccination, which is what we’re delivering,” said one official.

In addition, federal officials are talking to nations that are popular with Canadian travelers to brief them about the document.

The Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced earlier this month that from Oct 30, people wishing to travel domestically by plane, train or ship would have to show proof of full vaccination.

 

(Reporting by David Ljunggren; Editing by Alistair Bell)

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