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The ultimate guide for installing the Google Play Store on Amazon Fire tablets – Android Police

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Amazon’s Fire tablets are incredibly popular, mostly because they’re incredibly cheap. However, none of them come with access to the Google Play Store, which is how most Android devices download and install applications. Instead, Fire tablets come bundled with the Amazon Appstore, which has a much smaller library and lacks any Google-made apps and services. No YouTube, no Chrome, and so on.

The good news is that it’s not incredibly difficult to install the Play Store on a Fire tablet, and the whole process can take as little time as 10 minutes. This complete guide for installing the Play Store on Fire tablets has detailed instructions for every model produced since 2014, with added troubleshooting steps if you run into issues.

IMPORTANT INFO

  1. Remove your tablet’s microSD card if you have one installed. If you don’t, the Play Store and its required may be automatically installed to the microSD card, which can cause issues. You can put the card back in once you’re done.
  2. There is no way to manage a Fire tablet through Google Family Link, even after the Play Store is installed.
  3. Apps installed through the Play Store might not work with Amazon FreeTime app management. I haven’t personally tested this, but that’s what many people have reported in the comment section.
  4. Some apps hide themselves from the Play Store on Fire tablets, because Fire tablets are not SafetyNet-certified by Google (more info here). Netflix is one app that does this. For those applications, you can try finding them on the Amazon Appstore or downloading them on APKMirror.

Enable installation from unknown sources

The first step in this process is to enable apps to be installed from outside the Amazon Appstore. This allows you to open and install applications from downloaded APK files, which is how we’ll get the Play Store running.

First, go to the main ‘Home’ page on your home screen and open the Settings app. If you just got your tablet, it’s probably near the bottom of the list. Then tap the ‘Security & Privacy category (older models might just say ‘Security’), find the switch for ‘Apps from Unknown Sources,’ and turn it on.

This process is slightly different on newer Fire tablets. If tapping ‘Apps from Unknown Sources’ brings up a list of apps, find the Documents app on the list and slide the switch to ON for ‘Allow from this source’.

Now you’re ready to download and install the APKs needed to get the Google Play Store running.

Install the Play Store

The next step is to download the proper APK files for the Play Store. You technically have to install four different applications Google Account Manager, Google Services Framework, Google Play Services, and finally the Google Play Store. The first three apps handle basic account services and add APIs, while the last app is the store itself.

Because different Fire tablets run different versions of Android with varying hardware, the exact APKs you have to install depend on what Fire tablet you have. If you’re not sure which model you have, open the Settings app again, tap on ‘Device Options & System’ (it might also just be called ‘Device Options’), and look at what is listed under ‘Device Model.

If you’re not already reading this on your Fire tablet, open the Silk web browser and type andp.lc/firetabletplay into the address bar to jump straight to this post.

For the Google Account Manager and Google Services Framework applications, find the appropriate links for your device from the table below, and tap the main ‘Download APK’ button on the linked page. Don’t open the downloaded files yet, we’ll do that later.

For these last two applications, click the link for your device, then select the version closest to the top of the list which doesn’t have “beta” in the name. Again, don’t open the files yet, just download them.

Now it’s time to install the apps. Find the Documents app on your tablet (it might also be called ‘Docs’) and open it. Then, find your device’s Downloads folder. For example, on the Fire HD 8, downloaded files can be found by tapping ‘Download’ in the side menu, or by selecting the ‘Local Storage’ tab and tapping the Download folder.

Finding downloaded APKs on a Fire HD 8

You should see all four APK files ⁠— if not, go back and see which one you missed (or just download all of them for good measure). Open the apps in the below order, and when the installation is complete, press ‘Done’ and not ‘Open’. Installing the apps out of order will cause the Play Store to not work. Also, if you have an SD card, make sure to take it out during these installations.

  1. com.google.gsf.login
  2. com.google.android.gsf
  3. com.google.android.gms
  4. com.android.vending

Once you have installed all four apps, hold down the power button, and tap ‘Restart’ to restart your tablet. Older tablets might only have the option to power off — if so, let the tablet shut down, then hold down on the power button to turn it back on.

Restart (or power off, and back on again) after you finish installing the Play Store.

After your Fire tablet has booted back up, open the new Play Store app from the home screen. From there, the Play Store should ask you to login with your Google account, and then finally allow you to download and install apps.

Fixes for common problems

If the Play Store or other Google apps aren’t working correctly, here are some fixes for common issues.

“This account already exists on your device”

If you get the error “This account already exists on your device” when signing into Chrome or another Google app, or if the app won’t detect your Google account at all, follow these steps:

  1. Completely close the app you’re having issues with (e.g. swipe it away in the Recents/multi-tasking screen).
  2. Open the Settings app, tap Apps & Permissions, then select ‘Manage all applications.’ These options might have different names, depending on your version of Fire OS.
  3. Find the app you’re having issues with in the list, tap on it, and select ‘Permissions’.
  4. Switch all available permissions to ‘On’. Enabling the Contacts permission alone did the trick in my testing, but you might as well enable everything for good measure.
  5. Open the app again.

In Chrome’s case, you also have to open the browser, tap on the Settings menu, and tap the ‘Continue as…’ blue button at the top of the screen.

Troubleshooting

If you’re having a different issue than the ones listed above, here are some generic troubleshooting tips.

Reboot your tablet

This might be obvious, but it’s a good step to take. Hold down the power button, tap the ‘Power Off’ option, and turn your tablet back on by holding down the power button again. Once it has booted back up, open the Play Store from the home screen and see if it works.

Clear app data

When I initially wrote this guide, I wasn’t able to sign into the Play Store until I cleared the app’s local data. This will essentially reset the Play Store app to its original state, and should fix most problems you might encounter.

Open the Settings app, select the ‘Apps & Notifications’ section (or whatever else has ‘Apps’ or ‘Applications’ in the name), and tap ‘Manage All Applications.’ Find the Play Store in the list of apps and tap it.

You have to perform two steps on this info screen. First, press the ‘Force Stop’ button to stop the Play Store from running. Then press the ‘Storage’ menu option and tap ‘Clear Data’. Now return to the Play Store app and see if it works.

If that didn’t help, follow the above steps again, but restart your tablet before trying to open the Play Store. If that didn’t work either, try force-stopping and clearing data for Google Play Services in addition to the Play Store.

Reset the tablet

If you still can’t get the Play Store to work, your best option is probably to factory-reset your tablet and try again. Make sure you don’t restore from a backup when you’re setting up the tablet again, unless the backup was made before you tried to install the Play Store.

Stuff to do afterwards

Congrats, your Fire tablet now has the Google Play Store! Pat yourself on the back. Now that the hard part is over, here are some things you should do or keep in mind.

Install Google apps

Now that you have the Play Store, you can download all the Google apps you couldn’t download before! Here are some suggestions if you’re reading this on your Fire tablet, the links will take you right to the app’s Play Store page.

Google
Google
Price:
Free
YouTube
YouTube
Price:
Free
Google Photos
Google Photos
Price:
Free
Gmail
Gmail
Price:
Free
Google Calendar
Google Calendar
Price:
Free
Google Keep - Notes and Lists
Google Keep - Notes and Lists
Price:
Free
Google Duo - High Quality Video Calls
Google Duo - High Quality Video Calls
Price:
Free

Set Chrome as default browser

If you use Chrome as your main browser, you might want to install it on your Fire tablet and set it as the default browser. First, download it from the Play Store on your Fire tablet, either by searching “Chrome” on the store or by tapping the below link.

Google Chrome: Fast & Secure
Google Chrome: Fast & Secure
Price:
Free

Once that’s done, open the Settings app and navigate to ‘Apps & Notifications’ > ‘Default apps’ > ‘Browser app’. Finally, select Chrome from the list. Now all links should open in Chrome by default, and Chrome Custom Tabs should work.

Install Google Play on other device profiles

Since the Play Store isn’t a system-level application on Fire tablets, the install process only applies to the device profile you’ve been using. If you want to add the Play Store for other users on the same device, the steps are a bit different, because Amazon’s Fire OS won’t let you have different versions of Play Services and the Play Store installed on each profile thanks to Florian Wolters on Stack Overflow for pointing this out.

This is an extremely tedious process that will probably take longer than the original guide. Believe it or not, the below steps are still the easiest way to get the Play Store on other device profiles, with the fewest ways of screwing something up.

The easiest way to get the Play Store on another user profile is to extract the APKs already installed on the first profile and install them on the second profile. We only need to grab the files for Play Services and the Play Store.

On the user profile that already has the Play Store:

  1. Install ML Manager from the Play Store and open it.
  2. In the list of applications, find Google Play Services, and tap the ‘Extract’ button.
  3. Find Google Play Store in the list, and tap the ‘Extract’ button.

Now the two APKs have been saved to the ‘ML Manager’ folder in your tablet’s internal storage. Because user profiles can’t access the files from other profiles, you have to copy the two APKs somewhere else, log into the second profile, and copy them to the second profile’s files. The easiest way to do this is using Firefox Send.

  1. Open Firefox Send (send.firefox.com) on your tablet’s browser (Silk, Chrome, whatever).
  2. Tap the ‘Select files’ button, tap the menu button on the right, and select ‘Show internal storage’.
  3. While still in the file browser, open the left side menu and select your tablet (it should be the only item that says how much storage is remaining).
  4. Open the ML Manager folder, hold down on one of the files until ‘1 selected’ appears, then tap the second file. It should say ‘2 selected’ at the top.
  5. Tap the Upload button.
  6. When the files have finished uploading, you’ll get a link. You’ll need to open that link on the second profile, so write it down, email it to the other user, log into Google Keep on the web and put it in a note, whatever works best for you.

Now you have everything you need, so it’s time to switch to the other user profile.

On the user profile that doesn’t have the Play Store:

  1. Open the web browser and go to the link you got in the previous step.
  2. Download the ZIP file with the two APKs inside.
  3. Open the Amazon Appstore, search for ‘ES File Explorer,’ and download it.

Now, go back to the very start of this guide, and follow the instructions just like before. When you get to the steps where you have to download APKs, only download and install the first two items Google Account Manager and Google Services Framework. Once you install those two apps, you need to install the APKs you just copied from the first profile.

  1. Open ES File Manager from the home screen.
  2. Tap on the menu button at the top-left, tap ‘Local’, and tap ‘Download’.
  3. Tap the ZIP file you downloaded earlier (it’s probably called ‘Send-Archive’).
  4. You should see two APKs. Just like before, these have to be installed in the correct order.
  5. Tap the one that starts with ‘com.google.android.gms’ (this one is Google Play Services), then tap ‘Install’.
  6. Now tap the one that starts with ‘com.android.vending’ (this one is the Play Store), then tap ‘Install’.

Now reboot your tablet again, log into the second profile, and see if the Play Store works. If you encounter issues, take a look at the Troubleshooting section above.

There you have it the ultimate guide to installing the Google Play Store on Amazon’s Fire tablets. If you’re having troubles, leave a comment, and we’ll do our best to help. Your feedback might even help us improve this guide!

  • Thanks:
  • Zampacto (Fire 10 2019 help),
  • Trevor (Chrome login fix)

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PlayStation 5 games reveal event June 4: How to watch, start time and what to expect – CNET

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Sony’s invite for its June 4 PlayStation event


Sony

The coronavirus pandemic may have shut down the annual E3 video game show this year, but Sony’s still planning to hold events to discuss its upcoming PlayStation 5 video game console before the launch this fall.

The latest will be a video game reveal, slated for June 4. The event, which PlayStation CEO Jim Ryan touted as a first look at games that’ll be made for the console, will be held entirely online and will last about an hour.

“The games coming to PS5 represent the best in the industry from innovative studios that span the globe,” Ryan said when announcing the event. “Studios, both larger and smaller, those newer and those more established, all have been hard at work developing games that will showcase the potential of the hardware.”

Along with our sister site GameSpot, CNET’s global team will cover Sony’s event, as well as other conferences that have shifted online. And our coverage will include the real-time updates, commentary and analysis you can only get here.

Sony said more events will occur after its June showcase.

US

Sony’s event starts June 4 at 4 p.m. ET.

UK

Sony’s event starts June 4 at 9 p.m. BST.

Australia

Sony’s event starts June 5 at 6 a.m. AEST.

Where

You can watch it live on Sony’s official PlayStation website.

It’ll be also streamed live on Sony’s PlayStation YouTube page and live on the PlayStation Twitch page.

We’ll embed the YouTube link in this post closer to the time, so you’ll be able to watch the event in this post.

What we can expect

Sony appears to understand some fans were disappointed with a gaming showcase Microsoft held in early May. That event, which was billed as a first opportunity to see gameplay for titles coming to the upcoming Xbox Series X, was criticized as mostly being a collection of trailers rather than a look at what it’ll be like to play new games. Microsoft has another event planned for July, when it plans to show off new games from its own development studios — including 343 Industries, makers of the hit Halo space combat series and its newest title, Halo Infinite.

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Image bricks some Android phones when used as wallpaper – Engadget

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Chris Velazco/Engadget

Never mind a text character crashing your phone — if you’re on Android, your choice of wallpaper could be a larger problem. Users have discovered (via Android Authority and 9to5Google) that an innocuous landscape photo is “soft-bricking” some Android phones when it’s used as a background. Your phone isn’t completely dead if it happens, but it’ll get stuck in a loop that turn the lock screen on and off, even after a reboot. Your recourses are to either use safe mode to delete the photo file or use the bootloader to reset the device entirely.

The issue may come down to the color spaces your phone supports and how they’re handled. Dylan Roussel from 9to5 discovered that the source image uses the RGB color space instead of Android’s preferred sRGB, and Android 10 doesn’t convert it where the Android 11 preview does — that causes problems any time an incompatible phone has to display the picture, which is a problem if you’ve just set the photo as your wallpaper. Other images will likely lead to the same issue.

We’ve asked Google for comment. This is easy enough to avoid if you’re aware of it. It could be a serious problem if pranksters trick unsuspecting people, however, especially if they don’t know how to recover. If nothing else, it’s a reminder to get wallpapers only from sources you trust.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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Here Are The Excellent Free PlayStation Plus Games For June 2020 – Forbes

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Well, it turns out the leaks were partly right and partly wrong.

I wrote about two games that had been leaked as possible PS Plus games for the month of June: Marvel’s Spider-Man (which seemed very unlikely) and Star Wars: Battlefront II (which seemed more likely).

Turns out, the second leak was correct. Star Wars: Battlefront II joins Call Of Duty: WWII as the two free games for PS+ subscribers this June.

That’s quite a haul—two major, AAA shooters. One historical, the other space opera. Both quite different in terms of gameplay, map size and so forth, but also both first-person competitive shooters.

It’s almost like something got mixed up at Sony over the past two months. May’s two games were both sims—a city-building sim and a farming sim, which you can see here—now June’s games are both FPS’s.

That’s . . . odd, to say the least. Normally we’d get one shooter and one sim or something along those lines.

Whatever the case, I can’t recommend Call Of Duty: WWII highly enough. The new War Mode alone is worth the price of admission (or, since it’s free, the download file and your precious time).

This game was already announced and released on PS Plus a few days ago, making it a sort of May/June hybrid. I assumed Sony would release two more games but I guess it’s just these two.

I’m less enthusiastic about Star Wars: Battlefront II but that may be partly because of the game’s disastrous launch. I should play it again now that some time has passed and EA and DICE have fixed some of its more glaring issues. It’s certainly a gorgeously designed game and fun if you’re into Star Wars.

Call Of Duty: WWII

War Mode

Call Of Duty: WWII released in 2017. Developed by Sledgehammer Games, this is one of my favorite entries in the franchise this console generation. Only 2019’s Call Of Duty: Modern Warfare is better, as far as I’m concerned. Even Modern Warfare is missing one of the best modes that made WWII so great.

That’s War Mode, and it’s simply terrific. Unlike normal Call Of Duty multiplayer, War Mode maps are set up in multiple stages. Each “Operation” involves an offensive and defensive side.

For instance, in Operation Breakout, one side has to capture a base (by standing in a building with no enemies present); then proceed to build a bridge for a tank to cross a wide ditch (by interacting with a two-stage bridge while under heavy fire); then destroy an ammo depot (by planting a bomb and then guarding it until it explodes); then guide a tank to the enemy’s anti-aircraft guns (similar to guiding a Payload in Overwatch).

The opposing team tries to stop them, and this can be achieved at any of the four points in the Operation. If you prevent the opposing team from building before the timer runs out at the bridge, for instance, the match is over. The timer resets at each stage.

Other Operations have completely different objectives. In Operation Neptune, the attacking team has to storm the beaches at Normandy, while the defenders fire down from bunkers perched above the beach. Then the attackers must destroy all the radio equipment at another bunker further inland. Following that, the attackers have to plant and detonate three bombs each on two enemy cannons, while the defenders do their best to stop them and diffuse any bombs.

It’s an absolutely terrific game mode and some of the most fun I’ve ever had with any Call Of Duty game.

The game also has a strong historical campaign that takes place beginning with the storming of the beaches of Normandy that follows a squad of American soldiers as the push across Europe. It’s a story we’ve all heard before, but it has a really fascinating twist and a surprising ending that’s really stuck with me.

Traditional multiplayer is also very good, with plenty of maps and modes—like Domination and Team Death Match—to keep you busy.

Star Wars: Battlefront II

I’m looking forward to picking this game back up after so long, as everyone I talk to says it’s improved massively since launch.

While the game does have a campaign—unlike the previous Battlefront—it’s nothing to write home about. The real meat of this game is in its multiplayer modes.

Multiplayer modes include:

  • Blast — Basically deathmatch.
  • Extraction — Move cargo across a map past various checkpoints while the other team tries to stop you.
  • Ewok Hunt — Stormtroopers hunt down Ewoks at night on Endor. The other team is the Ewoks. When an Ewok kills a Stormtrooper, the player becomes an Ewok, gradually increasing that team’s size.
  • Strike — Team-based objective mode where two teams of 8 fight over an objective like planting a bomb or defusing it.
  • Supremacy — Non-linear battles where teams need to take down capital ships. This is the main mode in Battlefront II. Two large teams battle it out trying to fill the score meter which in turn signals a capital ship to extract the winning team. Once this happens the second phase begins, transforming the match from an outdoors battle to a close-quarters firefight. The invading team has to break into the ship and destroy it but has a limited number of lives.
  • Starfighter Assault — 12 vs 12 spaceship battles with AI bots thrown into the mix.
  • Galactic Assault — Large, team-oriented, objective-based maps. Teams of 20 with vehicles, reinforcements, heroes and so forth, with maps from all eras of Star Wars.
  • Hero Starfighters — You can unlock both Heroes and their starships in this game, but this mode lets you play all the Hero starships, such as the Millenium Falcon.
  • Hero Showdown — Two vs two combat between heroes like Yoda, Kylo Ren, Luke Skywalker, Darth Vader, Rey and Chewbacca.
  • Heroes vs Villains — 4 vs 4 hero battles. Each team has 35 lives and whichever team is left standing wins.
  • Co-op — 4-player teams fight AI bots, capturing segments of the map to win.
  • Instant Action — Large-scale offline battles against bots.

As you can see, there’s plenty in both these games to keep you occupied which is why this really is one of the most exciting PlayStation Plus months in a very long time.

Call of Duty: WWII is available now on PS Plus. Star Wars: Battlefront II will be available on June 2nd.

You can check out the free Xbox Game With Gold for June here.

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