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The worst passwords of 2020 show we are just as lazy about security as ever – ZDNet

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It’s that time of year again — when we see whether or not password security has improved over the past 12 months. 

Going back to 2015, the worst passwords still commonly used included “123456” and “password.” Fast forward five years, and these examples are still very much alive. 

After analyzing 275,699,516 passwords leaked during 2020 data breaches, NordPass and partners found that the most common passwords are incredibly easy to guess — and it could take less than a second or two for attackers to break into accounts using these credentials. Only 44% of those recorded were considered “unique.”

See also: NSA publishes list of top vulnerabilities currently targeted by Chinese hackers

On Wednesday, the password manager solutions provider published its annual report on the state of password security, finding that the most popular options were “123456,” “123456789,” “picture1,” “password,” and “12345678.”

With the exception of “picture1,” which would take approximately three hours to decipher using a brute-force attack, each password would take seconds using either dictionary scripts — which compile common phrases and numerical combinations to try — or simple, human guesswork. 

As one of the entrants on the 200-strong list describes the state of affairs when it comes to password security, “whatever,” it seems many of us are still reluctant to use strong, difficult-to-crack passwords — and instead, we are going for options including “football,” “iloveyou,” “letmein,” and “pokemon.”

The 10 most common passwords of 2020, based on NordPass’ dataset, are listed below:

screenshot-2020-11-16-at-15-09-49.png

CNET: Rules for strong passwords don’t work, researchers find. Here’s what does

When selecting a password, you should avoid patterns or repetitions, such as letters or numbers that are next to each other on a keyboard. Adding a capital letter, symbols, and numbers in unexpected places can help, too — and in all cases, you should not use personal information as a password, such as birthdates or names. 

While vendors need to be reminded that allowing easy and simple combinations do nothing to protect the privacy and security of users, it is also up to us to take responsibility for our own accounts. 

TechRepublic: Hackers for hire target victims with cyber espionage campaign

If you find it hard to remember complex passwords for different accounts, you may want to consider using a password locker. If you need somewhere to start, check out our recommendations for the best password managers and vaults in 2020

Previous and related coverage


Have a tip? Get in touch securely via WhatsApp | Signal at +447713 025 499, or over at Keybase: charlie0


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Westland Insurance marks 40th anniversary with charity campaign – Insurance Business Canada

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In celebration of its 40 years of business, Westland Insurance Group will be handing out grants to various charities across Canada – specifically local charities in the communities the broker operates in.

The broker’s “40 Weeks of Giving” campaign will see Westland support a cause every week for the next 40 weeks. The campaign began last week, and two charities have already received donations from Westland – the first recipient being the Burns Bog Conservation Society, which works to protect Canada’s fragile ecosystems; and the second recipient being the Canadian Mental Health Association, which works to reduce the impact of mental illness and addiction.

Westland Insurance, founded in 1980, has over 150 locations across five provinces – BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario.

Read more: Westland Insurance Group acquires Diamond Insurance Agencies

Recently, it acquired Calgary-based Diamond Insurance Agencies. The acquired brokerage focuses on residential, auto, life, travel, recreation, farm, and commercial insurance services.

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The Hennessey Venom 800 wants to give Ford's F-150 an edge over Ram's TRX – Driving

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Ram’s new TRX is a factory-built monster truck, with a 703-horsepower Hellcat V8 that tops the charts in terms of truck performance. Neither GM or Ford can rival that performance in a stock truck — but what they lack in factory support, they gain in aftermarket enthusiasm.

Yes, that’s where Hennessey comes in, with its new Venom 800 supertruck. Based on the latest generation F-150, the Venom 800 features a 5.0-litre V8 fitted with a 3.0-litre supercharger bigger than the engines of some cars.

The supercharger produces eight pounds of boost, helping to produce 805 horsepower and 727 lb-ft of torque when running on E85. Other horsepower aids include an upgraded stainless-steel exhaust system and new intake, fuel pump, and fuel injectors. All these tweaks make the truck pretty quick, with a quoted zero-to-96-km/h time of 3.6 seconds.

It also has massive six-piston Brembo brakes with 15.1-inch rotors on the front to bring it to a stop, as well as a six-inch lift kit, 20-inch wheels with 35-inch tires, and more aggressive shocks with external reservoirs.

Visual upgrades include a new front bumper, special Hennessey grille, LED light bar, and a numbered plaque on the interior. The Hennessey Venom 800 will be limited to 100 units, and costs US$149,500. That price includes the donor vehicle, as well as a three-year 36,000-mile warranty.

Hennessey already makes a 6×6 variant of the Ram TRX that makes 1,200 horsepower, and it’s only a matter of time before the performance brand takes the regular TRX to the next level as well.

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$2M from angel donor helps Edmonton toddler receive life-saving treatment – CTV Edmonton

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EDMONTON —
It was July 17 and Kaysen Martin’s second birthday had come and gone.

A day that had more significance than just adding another candle to the cake. It was also the deadline for Kaysen’s family to raise $2.8 million for a one-time gene therapy treatment to combat a rare disease called Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type 1 (SMA 1).

Fast forward four-and-a-half months.

An “angel donor” donated the remaining $2 million Kaysen needed to receive the therapy drug Zolgensma to treat the disease that affects the muscles used for lung support, swallowing, and crawling.

“It was a huge sigh of relief,” Kaysen’s mom, Lana Bernardin, told CTV News Edmonton. “It did take longer and, you know, it was complicated, but at the end of the day, we’re here, it’s done, (the drug) is in him and that’s all that matters.”

His family raised hundreds of thousands of dollars before the July 17 deadline thanks to community, and celebrity, donations.

Canadian actor Ryan Reynolds donated $5,000 to the cause while Edmonton-born actor Nathan Fillion put out a call for help on Twitter.

“To be able to come forward today and say that this has happened, we made it happen as a community is like amazing,” said Bernardin.

Which means adding more candles on Kaysen’s birthday cakes for years to come.

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