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This Record-Breaking Astronaut's Dog Is Really Glad to See Her. But. – Futurism

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Look: We here at Futurism Dot Com are not immune — like every other media outlet on the internet — to the occasional shameless Internet Dog post.

Among our ranks are dog owners; our office is dog-friendly. Also, we’re shameless. So here’s a video of NASA astronaut Christina Koch coming home to her dog after returning from her record-setting 328-day spaceflight:

The dog’s name, for the record, is LBD, which stands for Little Brown Dog. And look at our fawning contemporaries in media, covering this particular story:

Ah, yes, CNN: That regal news operation, just bowled over by this dog. Time magazine, that old stalwart, argues that this dog could not be happier.

We beg to differ.

Allow us to introduce you, dear reader, to the Master Returns subreddit, which is full of videos of dogs who are far happier to see their owners — who weren’t even in space! — than Christina Koch’s dog, which could do better:

Reunited with Ruby after almost four weeks away from MasterReturns

See? This dog certainly did better:

WELCOME HOME A soldier’s worry her beloved dog wouldn’t remember her while she was deployed in Africa quickly dissolved by the pup’s public freakout at the airport from MasterReturns

This dog absolutely owns lesser dogs with a greeting involving pirouettes:

It’s been a whole 2 hours since we’ve seen each other from aww

See? That’s all. We just expect more of that dog.

Related: Welcome back, Christina Koch. Not that you needed a reminder, but Earth is full of assholes, and only dogs are good. Also, LBD, do better.

MORE #FUTURISM_PETS CONTENT: These Cats Refuse to Die of Coronavirus Before Their Humans

EVEN MORE #FUTURISM_PETS CONTENT: If You Don’t Adopt These Animals the FDA Experimented on You’re a Bad Person

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Is there really life on Venus? How do we find out? – News 1130

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In today’s Big Story podcast, last week, an unlikely research project made a startling discovery: Phosphine gas in the atmosphere of Venus. That’s something that, as far as we know, is created by living organisms. Our efforts to find signs of life on other worlds, and a lot of our space dreaming in general, tend to focus on Mars. But all of a sudden we need to take a closer look at our other planetary neighbour.

So how can we find out if there’s really life right next door? What do we know about Venus and why has it been so hard to figure out so far? What else could possibly cause the presence of Phosphine and what would it mean, to space exploration and everything else, if this is really true?

GUEST: Neel Patel, space reporter, MIT Technology Review

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

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Is there really life on Venus? How do we find out? – HalifaxToday.ca

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Last week, an unlikely research project made a startling discovery: Phosphine gas in the atmosphere of Venus. That’s something that, as far as we know, is created by living organisms. Our efforts to find signs of life on other worlds, and a lot of our space dreaming in general, tend to focus on Mars. But all of a sudden we need to take a closer look at our other planetary neighbour.

So how can we find out if there’s really life right next door? What do we know about Venus and why has it been so hard to figure out so far? What else could possibly cause the presence of Phosphine and what would it mean, to space exploration and everything else, if this is really true?

GUEST: Neel Patel, space reporter, MIT Technology Review

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The 'Red Planet' approaches – Coast Reporter

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This summer has been pretty interesting with Comet NEOWISE, the Perseids and some close lunar/planetary appulses in September. (Yes, it’s my new vocabulary word of the month.) October, however, is all about Mars – but the COVID-19 threat we’re facing limits our options somewhat. 

Opposition occurs when Earth passes between the sun and a celestial object – they’re opposite to each other in the sky. Because of our orbital periods – 365 days for Earth and 780 earth days for Mars – a Mars opposition happens about every 26 months. However, the accompanying composite of Hubble images from previous oppositions illustrates that there’s more to it than just that. For example, although opposition is Oct. 13, we’re actually slightly closer on Oct. 6. 

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First, neither planet has a circular orbit; Earth’s is slightly elliptical and Mars’ is much more so. Hence, the close approach distance varies according to how close or far from the Sun each planet is. Second, Earth and Mars orbit in slightly different planes; Mars can be above or below the plane of Earth’s orbit and therefore a bit further away. As well, Mercury and Venus slightly affect Earth’s orbit and Jupiter affects everything, so all the orbits change slowly over time. Finally, we’re in the northern hemisphere; a near-winter opposition puts Mars much higher in the sky at night and we look through much less atmosphere. Although Mars isn’t quite as close as it was in July 2018, it will be about 30 degrees higher – better seeing. 

The Astronomy Picture of the Day site (APOD) at https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ for Sept. 11 has a striking photo of Mars emerging from behind the Moon taken on Sept. 6 from Brazil, one of five occultations this year. The photo, lovely as it is, illustrates the problem of viewing Mars for most of us: you need a telescope. While you can see Jupiter as a small disc and four moons with good binoculars and a tripod, Mars at its best is only a third that size. Without the current pandemic, I’m sure the Sechelt observatory would be open to the public for this opposition and people could stare to their hearts’ content, but at this point it doesn’t look good. Any changes will be posted on the club website. 

As in September, Jupiter and Saturn are low in the south after sunset, after their opposition in late July. The New Moon on the 16th coincides with its perigee (large tides) and it will pass Jupiter and Saturn a week later on the 22nd and 23rd. Interestingly, it will be a Full Moon on the 1st AND the 31st. 

Remember, all of the movements of moon and planets described can be checked out on the web at: www.heavens-above.com. The next regular meeting of the Astronomy Club should be Oct. 9 at 7 p.m. using Zoom. Information on the speaker and topic and how to register for the meeting will be on the club website at https://sunshinecoastastronomy.wordpress.com/ the week of the meeting.

– Richard Corbet

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