Connect with us

Art

This weekend is a perfect time to Hop into the Arts District – OrilliaMatters

Published

 on


Well folks we are moving into December and the holiday season and Christmas events are coming up fast here in O-town! Lots of opportunities to support local artisans, creatives, and businesses in your Christmas shopping and events.

First off, Mariposa Arts Theatre’s production of The Christmas Tree is still playing at the Orillia Opera House, Thursday to Sunday until Dec. 6. There are both matinee and evening shows, and audience members are limited to 50 and seated socially distanced in the large Gordon Lightfoot auditorium.

This is a lighthearted yet poignant Norm Foster show that will be sure to put you in the holiday mood. Members of the Orillia Silver Band will also be playing holiday music for your enjoyment. For tickets, click here.

The Orillia Arts District is hosting a Holiday Art Hop this Friday night from 5 to 8 p.m. and this Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. All the galleries along Peter St. S. will be open with special guest artists and beautiful one-of-a kind art and gifts for you to buy.

Hibernation Arts has a special arts draw going on for this event. Anyone who spends $50 on art there is entered into a draw for a special arts goodie bag…so get in and get spending! Many of the galleries have great ideas for gift giving, including soaps, coasters, cards, mini works of art, purses, pillows and more. Come and see what Orillia’s arts district has in store for you this Friday and Saturday.

This Saturday and every Saturday until Christmas, both the Orillia Farmers’ Market and the Orillia Fairgrounds Farmers’ Market have special Christmas markets happening.

Full of Christmas tasty treats and cheer and excellent locally-made Christmas presents to be bought and enjoyed. The Orillia Farmers’ Market downtown also has two special Christmas markets on Wed. Dec. 16 and 23 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. for your last-minute Christmas shopping.

Of course, this Friday is Black Friday and many stores downtown and about town have Black Friday sales and events happening. As well, many stores in downtown Orillia are open until 7 p.m. Friday nights, until Christmas, to help you with your Christmas shopping. And parking is free in the downtown lots!

Please please support our locally-owned and operated, independent stores and restaurants here in town, on Black Friday, this holiday season, and throughout the year.

They are hanging on by the skin of their teeth, and we all want them to still be here at the end of this terrible pandemic. Winter season, after Christmas, is a hard time for them every year, so let’s make sure they all have good Christmas sales to tide them through. Please help if you can.

Hip Chick Design is having a Pop Up Shop from Dec. 1 to 13 at Creative Nomad Studios. Beth McKean will be having lots of her talented maker friends join her in this one-stop-shop for Christmas, open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Saturday.

Rustica Pizza Vino is having an outdoor Christmas market, featuring some of your favourite independent makers and creatives, Friday, Dec. 4 and 11, from 4:30 to 9 p.m. Shop safely outside in a beautiful setting and enjoy some mulled wine and dessert pizza too.

Does creating put you in the holiday spirit? Then there are some upcoming workshops that you will enjoy! Craig Mainprize is hosting a landscape painting workshop on Nov. 27 at 7 p.m. at Creative Nomad Studios. You will be safely seated with your household bubble, or socially distanced, so come check out this awesome workshop and learn from this accomplished landscape painter. For tickets click here.

Creative Nomad Studios is also the home of a wreath making workshop on Nov. 28 at 2 p.m. with Elegance of Nature Floral Design. This is your chance to tap into your creative side and come home with a beautiful decoration for your front door. This will put you in the holiday spirit for sure. For tickets, click here.

And, on Dec. 1 at 7 p.m., also at Creative Nomad Studios, come enjoy a Paint Night with local artist Dale Duncan. The painting is entitled A Frosty Eve, and the workshop is designed for painters and non-painters alike, so come with your enthusiasm and holiday spirit and take part. Tickets are available here.

Storytelling Orillia is hosting a Legendary Kitchen Party, online on Nov. 29, with great stories and music, to celebrate Canadian Storytelling Day. For more information and for the link to participate, email visitors@orilliamuseum.org.

If you are looking to have a festive family photo taken this year, Streets Alive Productions is again hosting a Merry Streets Alive Christmas, where you can have your photo taken by local photog Deb Halbot and collect a beautiful hand painted Christmas ornament as well. There are two dates for this fun opportunity. Dec. 5 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. the event will be outside The Eclectic Café and Dec. 12 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. it will be in the Peter Street Arts District.

Of course, all of these fun lead up to the holiday events can only happen if Simcoe Muskoka stays in the orange zone for Ontario, regarding Covid-19. It is up to all of us to wear our masks, wash our hands, social distance and do NOT hang out with multiple people, unmasked, in private homes. That is a prime way this virus is spreading. Please, for the sake of our business owners, creatives, makers, and our friends and neighbours, stay safe and follow the guidelines. Let’s make sure we stay in the orange zone for the holidays. Take care.

And last minute, the award recipients for the Orillia Regional Arts and Heritage Awards are announced Wed. Nov. 25 at 7 p.m. on the Orillia Museum of Art and History YouTube channel, here. It starts at 7 p.m. and will be available after that time. Enjoy!

Please send your arts news to annaproctor111@gmail.com by Tuesday at noon to be included.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

10 year-old uses art and music as emotional outlet during pandemic – CTV Toronto

Published

 on


TORONTO —
The last 10 months haven’t been easy for 10 year-old Anushka Sabeshan.

“It’s been pretty hard. I get anxious about these things,” she told CTV News Toronto. “My classmate tested positive, my dad tested positive, so it’s just been like a whole rollercoaster for me. And I feel like a lot of kids around the world are feeling that way right now.”

The Markham, Ont. girl has been channeling her feelings and emotions through different artistic platforms, like painting.

“This art like shows like how I want it to be, or how it is now, or how it’s changed and they just really express my feelings,” Sabeshan explained. “I’ve also been creating music.”

It’s Sabeshan’s music that caught the attention of her teacher and classmates. As part of a school project, the students were tasked with creating a song about COVID-19. Sabeshan’s song, ‘Mayhem,’ was so well received that her family allowed it to go public. A production team also helped her put together a music video.

“My song is about a child through the pandemic, and it shows how this can affect kids, too,” Sabeshan said. “Not being able to see my friends and not being able to go out to restaurants and all that stuff, it sucks.”

Sabeshan’s younger brother Devin helped with the video The six-year-old says he shares many of his sister’s emotions.

“I felt really bad about COVID,” he told CTV News Toronto. “I wish it would go away.”

The siblings hope ‘Mayhem’ brings a feeling of calm to other young people during this difficult time.

“I think my music people will help other people just to reassure them that they’re not alone. Like, other people are feeling these feelings, too,” Sabeshan said. “It also is to create awareness for everybody to stay safe so we can get through this faster.”

“[Anushka] sings them a song to make them happy,” Devin says. “That’s what she does for other kids.”

‘Mayhem’ was put together with the help of Enliven Entertainment and Steve Cliff Valentine, who produced the music, along with Jeysan Sivakumar, who directed the video.

Sabeshan’s advice for other kids experiencing complex feelings during this time is to find something to do that makes them happy, or that they feel passionate about.

“I will definitely keep making paintings and making music,” she told CTV News Toronto. “And I encourage all people around the world to find things like what they like and just do them, just to take your mind off the pandemic.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Outdoor Gallery Stratford project brings art to life – The Beacon Herald

Published

 on


Article content continued

“I want to flip that idea on its side and have the viewer engage in the evolution of the art piece itself – watching it change and seeing a bit of the creative process as it goes,” Dunnem said.

Dunnem used hot and cold water and soap to turn natural wool from a stuffing-like texture to fabric that wouldn’t fall apart. She used plant-based dye to colour the material and then cut more than 360 pieces that were affixed to the tree using its bark as a natural adhesive.

Peg Dunnem (Cory Smith/The Beacon Herald)

The project is similar to another soft sculpture piece Dunnem created in the summer that incorporated the gallery’s trees.

“I’ve always had a close relationship with nature and trees,” she said. “I spend a lot of time out in the woods and the forest. Even as a young child we spent our summers in a remote area where there were no other humans, so I adopted the trees as more than trees – as friends – and that’s been ingrained.”

After Dunnem has attached the last piece of wool Thursday, the project will live on – kind of.

“I think there is just as much beauty in the deterioration and in the decay as there is in the actual artwork,” she said. “The sun, the light, the cold, the hot will start to break down the fibres, and bugs and spiders and natural material will start to hold on to the fibres as well, and it becomes its own piece of art without human intervention.”

The project has garnered attention both in person and on social media for those who can’t make it to the gallery, including someone from Austria, Dunnem said.

Gallery Stratford closed its doors to guests Dec. 24, and Brayham hopes to reopen in early April. Until then, outdoor artwork like Dunnem’s is a chance to both engage the public and encourage mindfulness and physical activity.

“Many of us right now are spending so much time on screens,” Brayham said, “so being present with the environment and present with art and with your feelings is so important right now.”

cosmith@postmedia.com

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Outdoor public art exhibit of painted canoe paddles comes to downtown Peterborough in February – kawarthaNOW.com

Published

 on


Carlotta James of Peterborough Pollinators with her 7-year-old son Salvador Haines, who painted this canoe paddle for the Painted Paddle art exhibit, which features 20 canoe paddles painted by volunteer artists on display at various locations in downtown Peterborough throughout February. Salvador says his paddle art, called The Elements, "represents the balance in nature with flowers blooming during the day and its roots growing by night, surrounded by the four elements: light blue for air, dark blue for water, red for fire and green for earth. Also, there’s a secret word painted in the roots, can you find it?". (Photo: Peterborough Pollinators / Facebook)
Carlotta James of Peterborough Pollinators with her 7-year-old son Salvador Haines, who painted this canoe paddle for the Painted Paddle art exhibit, which features 20 canoe paddles painted by volunteer artists on display at various locations in downtown Peterborough throughout February. Salvador says his paddle art, called The Elements, “represents the balance in nature with flowers blooming during the day and its roots growing by night, surrounded by the four elements: light blue for air, dark blue for water, red for fire and green for earth. Also, there’s a secret word painted in the roots, can you find it?”. (Photo: Peterborough Pollinators / Facebook)

A new outdoor public art exhibit featuring 20 canoe paddles painted by volunteer artists in the community is coming to downtown Peterborough in February.

Presented by the Downtown Vibrancy Project, the Painted Paddle art exhibit will be installed in street-front windows at various locations through the downtown area, including the Peterborough & the Kawartha Tourism Visitor Centre, Le Petit Bar, St. Veronus, Boardwalk Game Lounge, Sam’s Deli, Black Honey Bakery, Cork and Bean, B!KE, Watson and Lou, Cottage Toys, By The Bridge, GreenUp Store, Night Kitchen, Peterborough Downtown Business Improvement Area office, Meta4 Gallery, The Avant-Garden Shop, Sustain, Bluestreak Records, and Peterborough Social Services.

For those interested in taking a self-guided tour of the Painted Paddle exhibit, a map of all locations will be available at linktr.ee/LoveForTheBoro.

Advertisement – story continues below

 

 

“Art brightens the spirit and has a way of making people feel good,” says Tracie Bertrand, director of tourism at Peterborough & the Kawarthas Economic Development. “The Painted Paddle art project will put a smile on people’s faces as they fondly reflect on their memories of being outdoors here in Peterborough and the Kawarthas.”

Some of the people and organizations who have contributed paddle art for the project include Peterborough mayor Diane Therrien, Hiawatha First Nation, Wiigwaas Hiawatha Store, Peterborough Police Service, Peterborough DBIA, GreenUP, Trent Gzowski College, Trent Veg Garden, Peterborough Pollinators, Princess Gardens Retirement Residence, Empress Gardens Retirement Residence, St. Anne’s School, VegFest, B!KE, the Art School of Peterborough, city councillors Kim Zippel and Kemi Akapo, mother-and-daughter team Eileen and Kendron Kimmett, local Anishinaabe artist Kyler Kay, and local artist Tiphaine Lenaik.

“The paddle creates a unique way to honour and acknowledge the original families in Treaty 20,” says Tim Cowie, lands and resource consultant with Hiawatha First Nation, one of many creative community members who lent their artistic skills to the Painted Paddle project. Cowie painted his paddle to look like a piece of birch bark (wiigwaas) and painted the clans (dodems) on his paddle to showcase the family ties of the Michi Saagiig.

Retired police officer Kelleigh Traynor-Hartnett paints a paddle on behalf of the Peterborough Police Service for the Painted Paddle art exhibit, which features 20 canoe paddles painted by volunteer artists. The self-guided exhibit will be on display at various locations throughout downtown Peterborough during February. (Photo courtesy of Peterborough DBIA)
Retired police officer Kelleigh Traynor-Hartnett paints a paddle on behalf of the Peterborough Police Service for the Painted Paddle art exhibit, which features 20 canoe paddles painted by volunteer artists. The self-guided exhibit will be on display at various locations throughout downtown Peterborough during February. (Photo courtesy of Peterborough DBIA)

Jill Stevens, economic development officer of Hiawatha First Nation, incorporated Michii Saagiig culture as part of their painted paddle installation.

“Having a paddle as the canvas was the perfect backdrop for the Hiawatha logo, which depicts someone paddling through manomin (wild rice) stands,” Stevens says.

The Painted Paddle exhibit will be on display in downtown Peterborough from Monday, February 1st until Friday, March 5th.

Advertisement – story continues below

 

 

Painted paddles from the exhibition will be available in a virtual auction beginning at 8 p.m. on Friday, February 19th and continuing until 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 4th, just before the March First Friday Peterborough art crawl.

Proceeds from the auction at www.32auctions.com/paintedpaddles will go towards the One City Employment Program, which provides meaningful work to those with barriers to traditional employment.

Salvador Haines at work on his paddle for the Painted Paddle art exhibit. The paddles will be auctioned off to raise funds for the One City Employment Program, which provides meaningful work to those with barriers to ?traditional employment.  (Photo: Peterborough Pollinators / Facebook)
Salvador Haines at work on his paddle for the Painted Paddle art exhibit. The paddles will be auctioned off to raise funds for the One City Employment Program, which provides meaningful work to those with barriers to ?traditional employment. (Photo: Peterborough Pollinators / Facebook)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending