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Three potential COVID-19 exposure sites identified in Windsor-Essex – BlackburnNews.com

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Three potential COVID-19 exposure sites identified in Windsor-Essex

Windsor-Essex County Health Unit, Windsor, January 16, 2020. Photo by Mark Brown, Blackburn News.


The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit has disclosed three locations where people may have been exposed to coronavirus.

On Tuesday afternoon, the health unit identified the Value Village store on Walker Road in Windsor.  Exposure dates there are September 25 and 26.

Two Walmart locations in Windsor-Essex are also on this list. The first is on Sandwich Street in Amherstburg with exposure dates each day between September 25 and September 30. The other location is on Dougall Avenue in Windsor. Exposure dates at that store are September 21 and September 26.

No additional details have been released on any cases connected to these businesses.

The health unit says the risk of contracting COVID-19 is low, but anyone who visited these locations on the listed exposure dates is asked to self-monitor themselves for two weeks from the date of exposure.

The complete list of public exposure sites, and the criteria for disclosure, can be found at the official health unit website.

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COVID-19 'blind spots': The workplace lunchroom found to be source of viral transmission, top doc says – CTV News Ottawa

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OTTAWA —
As the COVID-19 pandemic grinds on, public health officials continue to urge residents to be cautious about the risk of viral spread, especially in relaxed settings with friends or family.

While regulations are in place governing mask use in public spaces and gathering spots like bars and restaurants are closed, Ottawa’s top doctor says there is still a risk outside of those places.

“Watch your blind spots,” said Dr. Vera Etches at a press conference on Tuesday. “Data collected during our case management process is indicating that we also have significant blind spots in situations that are not covered by provincial or municipal regulations, like crowd gathering limits or the mandatory mask by-law.”

Some of the so-called “blind spots” includes gathering with extended family or larger friend circles and thinking the risk of transmission isn’t there. Carpools without masks and social gatherings before and after sports were other examples.

Dr. Etches did not have any immediate data to compare the rate of transmission in these “blind spots” versus other kinds of high-risk activities or places, but stressed that close contact is the main driver of spread.

“Transmission of COVID-19 will occur in any setting if given the opportunity and the risk is there whenever people are less than two metres from each other and not wearing masks,” she said.

One particular source of transmission stands out: lunch.

“Employees having lunch together seems to be something that comes up over and over again as a source of outbreak,” Dr. Etches said. “It’s this idea that when we’re with our colleagues or our friends, we relax and it’s okay and think the risk isn’t there and that’s just not true. It is what gives the virus the opportunity to spread.”

In these cases, it’s recommended colleagues sit at least two metres apart during shared lunch breaks and wear masks when socializing.

While the message Tuesday was about individual actions, Dr. Etches also acknowledged the stress many people have been under during the pandemic.

“This is no one’s fault. This is a virus that is often present when people don’t know it. People have no symptoms or very mild symptoms they might not realize are COVID-19,” she said. “That’s why we need the distance between each other and we need to wear masks. The lunch is particularly challenging because we need to take off our masks to eat but even if you’re with your colleagues, that’s a risk.”

Daily case counts in Ottawa have been decreasing compared to earlier in the month, when there were several days of triple-digit increases. Dr. Etches says it shows people are largely doing the right thing to limit spread of the virus.

“I want to say congratulations to the people of Ottawa. There is some encouraging indication that we’re having some success in decreasing COVID in our community,” Dr. Etches said. “The rapid rise in people testing positive has changed. I want to encourage people to do what has been making a difference, that is, limiting our contacts with people outside our household.”

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Ontario reports 827 new COVID-19 cases – My Stratford Now

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Ontario is reporting 827 new COVID-19 cases.

Tuesday’s cases are just a bit lower than the 851 the province reported on Monday.

Eighty-one per cent of the new cases are in the hot spots around the GTHA and Ottawa.

Over 23,900 tests were completed over the last day, nearly half of the province’s goal of 50,000 a day, with a backlog of 22,636.

There have been 72,051 cases in Ontario since the start of the pandemic with 85.4 per cent deemed resolved.

Four more people have died from COVID-19 in the province bringing the death toll to 3,103.

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Stuck in a food rut? Why you need break out of it – The Globe and Mail

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Try cruciferous vegetables (for example, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, bok choy), which offer phytochemicals with anti-cancer properties.

iStockPhoto / Getty Images

Eating the same go-to meals week after week is easy and convenient. It saves time on meal planning and it makes calorie tracking a breeze.

Sticking to a limited menu can get boring, though, which can prompt you to seek out extra snacks and treats. Worse, it can undermine your nutrient intake, and possibly your health.

The good news: adding new foods to your meal plan can combat menu fatigue and provide vitamins, minerals and protective phytochemicals your diet might be missing.

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Why variety matters

A varied diet, long considered a key component of healthy eating, means eating foods across all food groups. It also means diversifying your choices within food groups.

Researchers define a diverse diet as one that includes at least five food groups including fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy and proteins.

Studies have tied greater dietary diversity to a lower risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, asthma, depression and anxiety. It may also have cognitive benefits for older adults.

Eating a variety of fruits and vegetables has been found to be especially important maintaining heart health.

A varied diet is good for your gut, too. Including a mix of foods that contain probiotic bacteria, fermentable fibres and polyphenols helps maintain a diverse community of beneficial gut microbes.

If you eat similar meals day in and day out, consider the following suggestions to infuse more variety – and nutrients – in your diet, food group by food group.

Vegetables

Try cruciferous vegetables (for example, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, bok choy), which offer phytochemicals with anti-cancer properties. Enjoy them cooked or raw added to salads.

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Include bright-orange vegetables, packed with beta-carotene, in your regular diet (such as carrots, sweet potato, pumpkin, butternut squash). Beta-carotene supports a healthy immune system and is thought to protect against cardiovascular disease.

Add interest to meals by varying how you prepare vegetables. Sauté chopped Swiss chard, spinach or kale, for example, with garlic and chili flakes. Or, roast carrots and parsnips with a spice blend such as curry powder, harissa or ras el hanout (my favourite).

Fruit

Berries are an exceptional source of brain-friendly flavonoids called anthocyanins.

Enjoy fruit that’s in season as well. Apples and pears are good sources of pectin, a prebiotic fibre that helps fuel the growth of good gut bacteria.

In the winter months, reach for citrus fruit to increase your intake of vitamin C and flavanones, a type of flavonoid shown to protect brain cells, strengthen blood vessels and reduce inflammation.

Whole grains

Expand your grain menu beyond bread. Add raw large-flake oats to smoothies or soak them overnight for an easy breakfast. Cook a batch of farro or freekeh, nutrient-rich whole grains high in fibre and protein, to add to grain bowls, green salads, roasted vegetables, chili and soups.

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Switch up oatmeal by making porridge with other grains such as quinoa, millet, teff or amaranth.

Proteins

Think beyond chicken, salmon and lean meat, as nutritious as they are. You’ll also get muscle-building protein from beans and lentils, along with lots of folate and fibre, which animal proteins lack.

Add a variety of beans to your next chili. Make hummus from chickpeas, white beans or black beans.

If your usual snack is a handful of almonds, vary it up to get different nutrient profiles. Try walnuts for omega-3s, pistachios for extra vitamin B6 or pumpkin seeds for extra magnesium.

To increase calcium, include protein from dairy or dairy alternatives such as pea milk or soy milk. There’s no reason why Greek yogurt can’t sub in for turkey at lunch.

Try kefir, a fermented milk beverage, which delivers protein, vitamins and minerals, and probiotic bacteria. Use it for overnight oats and smoothies or over granola.

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Leslie Beck, a Toronto-based private practice dietitian, is Director of Food and Nutrition at Medcan.

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