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Three Ways to Use Social Media to Impress Employers and Recruiters

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Like it or not, and out of your control, before inviting you for an interview employers will scrutinize your digital footprint to see what you leave on social media platforms, online communities, and forums.

Digital footprints are double-edged swords. Not having any social media presence or what can be considered a “bare minimum,” or “static” presence is a red flag. On the other hand, having an overly robust social media presence can appear to be flamboyant and narcissistic.

The standard advice is to not overshare on social media. However, what you share, particularly while actively looking for a new job, can impress, and therefore positively influence, employers and recruiters. According to the research, the top three items’ employers and recruiters like to see when researching a candidate’s social media presence are:

 

  • Written and/or design work
  • Engagement in volunteering, mentoring and non-profits
  • Mutual connections

 

The overarching theme: Is the candidate sharing to brag, or are they sharing to inform, educate and teach? In other words, is the candidate using social media to present themselves as an SME (Subject Matter Expert) within their field or industry?

 

The key, which is an art, is to share content that will likely have the viewer judge you positively. (Human nature being what it is, there’s no guarantee how you’ll be judged.) Since social norms are constantly shifting, how a person’s social media is judged also changes. An example of ever-changing social media taboos is selfies. Not long ago, selfies were viewed as being self-centred; today, they’re not viewed that way.

 

Expect employers to search your social media for:

 

  • Posts about your workplace and your achievements.
  • Posts about your personal life.
  • Post regarding topics do you seem to have a passion for.
  • Comments you’re leaving.
  • What you’re sharing, retweeting, and liking.
  • Blogs, articles, and posts you’ve written.

 

The key is to really believe in what you are saying (posting) and doing (pictures, videos). Avoid using profanity, name-calling, insulting, being deliberately offensive or controversial. (Being authentic is controversial enough.)

 

I admit that there are things I post that may turn off potential employers and recruiters. However, I accept the consequences of my believing in something and possibly offending a prospective employer, which is never my intention. If that’s the case, then that company isn’t likely to be a fit for me.

 

My recommendation is, to be honest, respectful and show a glass-half-full, optimistic approach.

 

Let’s look at the three items I mentioned employers and recruiters like to see and how you can incorporate them into your social media.

 

Written and/or design work

 

In 2021 successful job hunting requires having a LinkedIn profile that’s current and optimized. On your LinkedIn profile, upload and share documents, reports, presentations, links to articles you’ve written and awards you’ve received.

 

Keep in mind: Employers will read through your LinkedIn profile before deciding whether to schedule an interview with you.

 

Engaged in volunteering and mentoring  

 

On Instagram and Facebook, share photos of yourself volunteering at the local food bank, doing fundraising work or participating in a ‘run for a cure’ marathon. This shows you’re community-minded and which causes are close to your heart.

 

Mutual connections 

 

Who you know and who knows you greatly influences your job search and career progression success. As much as it may offend some, human beings are much more comfortable being around people they have a direct or mutual connection with. Commonalities ease the creation of and are the foundation of solid relationships. Therefore, the advice I give most often to job seekers: “Search for your tribe!” Making finding where you belong a priority is the best compass a job seeker can use.

 

Use LinkedIn to reach out and connect with people within your city, region, field and industry. Connect with people whom you’ve worked with or went to school with. Engage (e.g., comment on posts, ask questions) with people who can help you in your job search and career. Once you connect with someone on LinkedIn, be sure to do so on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. (Assuming they have accounts on these platforms.) Yes, I’m advising you to get in people’s faces letting them know you exist and what you can offer as an employee.

 

Your social media activity can significantly positively impact your job search, including shorting its length. When job hunting, you want to use your digital footprint to your advantage. Therefore, remain focused on communicating your attributes to create a confident and employer-appealing digital footprint.

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Nick Kossovan, a well-seasoned veteran of the corporate landscape, offers advice on searching for a job. You can send him your questions at artoffindingwork@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

Business

Canada competition watchdog may have to rely more on litigation – top official

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 Competition Bureau Canada watchdog may have to rely more on litigation after its proposed veto of a takeover was overturned, and this could make life harder for companies seeking to merge, the agency head said on Wednesday.

Matthew Boswell, commissioner of competition, noted his bureau had tried this year to block western Canadian oil and gas waste firm Secure Energy Services Inc from buying rival Tervita Corp.

Secure then turned to the independent Competition Tribunal, which denied the bureau’s injunction and underscored “the high bar that needs to be met to prevent mergers … that we allege are anti-competitive,” he said.

The tribunal, he said, had acted so quickly that the bureau had not had time to present all its evidence, raising valid questions about the state of competition laws in Canada.

“This decision has significant implications for how we conduct future merger reviews, particularly in cases where there are competition concerns,” Boswell said in a speech to the Canadian Bar Association.

“This may mean that we must pursue a litigation-focused approach that is costly and less predictable for merging parties,” he added.

Secure relied on the so-called efficiencies defense, which is unique to Canada. Boswell said this procedure allowed the tribunal to allow an anti-competitive merger to proceed if the transaction was deemed to produce efficiency gains that were greater than its anti-competitive effects.

“The efficiencies defense raises significant practical

challenges for the Bureau to estimate and measure anti-competitive harm,” he said. “(We should) ask ourselves whether our competition laws are really working in the best interest of all Canadians.”

The bureau is an independent law enforcement agency set up to ensure fair competition. It investigates price fixing, bid-rigging and mergers, among other matters.

 

(Reporting by David Ljunggren; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

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Canadian home price growth slows to near standstill in September

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Canadian home prices barely rose in September from August as a recent slowdown in housing sales weighed, data showed on Wednesday.

The Teranet-National Bank Composite House Price Index, which tracks repeat sales of single-family homes in 11 major Canadian markets, rose 0.1% in September from August, marking the fourth consecutive month in which the monthly price increase was lower than the previous month.

“The slowdown in price growth can be linked to the slowdown in housing sales reported in recent months by the Canadian Real Estate Association,” Daren King, an economist at National Bank of Canada, said in a statement.

Eight of the 11 major markets rose, led by a 1% gain for Winnipeg, while prices were stable in Montreal and fell in Vancouver as well as in Ottawa-Gatineau. It was the first time in seven months that gains were not seen in all 11 regions.

On an annual basis, the index was up 17.3%, decelerating after it notched record annual growth in August. It was paced by a 31.7% gain in Halifax and a 28.0% gain in Hamilton.

 

(Reporting by Fergal Smith; Editing by Steve Orlofsky)

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Oil rallies as U.S. crude stocks decline in tight market

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Oil prices rallied on Wednesday after U.S. Crude Inventories at the nation’s largest storage site hit their lowest level in three years and nationwide fuel stocks fell sharply, a signal of rising demand.

Brent crude futures settled at $85.82 a barrel, a gain of 0.9% or 74 cents and the highest since October 2018.

November U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude, which expires on Wednesday, settled at $83.87, up 91 cents, or 1.1%. The more active WTI contract for December settled up 98 cents to $83.42 a barrel.

 Crude prices have risen as supply has tightened, with the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries maintaining a slow increase in supply rather than intervening to add more barrels to the market, and as U.S. demand has ramped up.

Globally, refiners have been boosting output thanks to high margins, one that can only be restrained by maintenance. U.S. refining capacity use dropped in the most recent week, but analysts noted that supply may continue to tighten if U.S. refiners also pick up processing again.

“Stronger demand and concerns about a drop in inventories when refiners were already running a low rate during maintenance season is making people concerned about what will happen when refiners have to ramp up production to meet what is very strong demand for gasoline and distillate,” said Phil Flynn, senior energy analyst at Price Futures Group in Chicago.

U.S. crude stocks fell by 431,000 barrels in the most recent week, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said, against expectations for an increase, and gasoline stocks plunged by more than 5 million barrels as refiners cut processing due to maintenance. [EIA/S]

U.S. stocks at the Cushing, Oklahoma delivery hub hit their lowest level since October 2018. Gasoline stocks are now at their lowest since November 2019, the EIA said, while distillate stocks fell to levels not seen since early 2020.

Oil prices have also been swept up in surging natural gas and coal prices worldwide in anticipation that power generators may switch to oil to provide electricity.

Saudi Arabia’s minister of energy said users switching from gas to oil could account for demand of 500,000-600,000 barrels per day, depending on winter weather and prices of other sources of energy.

(Additional reporting by Sonali Paul in Melbourne and Koustav Samanta in Singapore; Editing by Andrea Ricci, Kirsten Donovan and David Gregorio)

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