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Top Trump adviser Peter Navarro disparages Canada's military efforts in Afghanistan – CTV News

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TORONTO —
“Every time that a Canadian shows up in a uniform, it’s doing us a favour? How’s that work?” That was a comment by Peter Navarro, an economist serving as director of the Office of Trade and Manufacturing Policy for U.S. President Donald Trump, published in a new book called “The Madman Theory: Trump Takes On the World.”

Navarro’s comments were aimed at Canadian soldiers who served in the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan. More than 40,000 members of the Canadian Armed Forces participated in the NATO mission after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. During the 12-year operation, 158 Canadian soldiers died, while thousands more returned with mental and physical injuries.

“Were they doing us a favour, or were they brought into the idea they needed to do that as part of the global effort against terrorists?” Navarro is quoted in the book as saying.

“I mean, if they were just doing us a favour, maybe their government should have been thrown out of office.”

Author Jim Sciutto was shocked by Navarro’s comments.

“It was mind blowing to me, here. You have arguably America’s closest ally in many respects … and the dismissiveness,” he said.

Former Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier, who at one point commanded the NATO ISAF in Afghanistan, called Navarro’s comments outrageous.

“And it shouldn’t be men and women in uniform and those who served in Afghanistan, every Canadian should be insulted by comments like that … to put it all in that view is ignorant, and ignorance is perhaps more frightening than being insulted,” he said.

Sciutto is the chief national security correspondent for CNN. His book explores how Trump’s unpredictable style and threats are alienating U.S. allies and empowering U.S. enemies.

“There’s a very zero-sum approach that Navarro and the president have, the kind of, ‘What have you done for us lately?’ kind of approach,” said Sciutto.

Navarro, who called Melania Trump the “Jackie Kennedy of her time” on Tuesday, predicted over the weekend that voters would give “tough guy” Trump a second term because “they know the world’s a dangerous place.”

In the book, Navarro also expressed disdain for Canada’s Liberal government, saying, “I mean, what’s good about Canada? They’re much more kind of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.”

Critics say Trump has courted dictators like North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un and Russia’s Vladamir Putin, while sidelining long-time allies like Germany, South Korea and Canada – a friend since the Second World War.

“I saw Canada basically join us in the foxhole … They too cared about the principles we were fighting for,” said Leon Panetta, former secretary of defense under then-President Barack Obama.

“It sends a signal to the rest of the world they cannot trust the United States.”

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Canada at 'crossroads' in battling COVID-19 as cases accelerate nationally, officials say – CBC.ca

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Canada is at a “crossroads” in its pandemic battle and the actions of individual Canadians will decide whether there’s a massive spike in COVID-19 cases coming, according to the latest projections from the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC).

Federal health officials presented new modelling today that shows the epidemic is accelerating nationally. They warned that if Canadians don’t step up preventative measures, the virus could spread out of control and trigger a wave of infections bigger than the first one.

“With minimal controls, the virus is capable of surging into a very sharp and intense peak because most Canadians don’t have immunity to the virus,” Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam told a news conference in Ottawa today.

Short-term projections show there could be up to 155,795 cases and up to 9,300 deaths by Oct. 3.

If the current rate of infection is maintained, the epidemic is expected to re-surge — but if that rate increases, it is expected to resurge “faster and stronger.”

Rapid detection of new cases and a swift response to outbreaks are both key to controlling the pandemic, PHAC modelling documents show.

Tam said there has been a significant demographic shift in the caseload since June: instead of the virus disproportionately affecting elderly Canadians, most infections are now being reported in Canadians aged 20 to 39.

Tam and her deputy, Dr. Howard Njoo, are joined by Health Minister Patty Hajdu and Minister of Public Services and Procurement Anita Anand at the news conference.

CBC News is carrying it live.

The last modelling figures were released on Aug. 14. At that time, Canada’s top doctors said they were striving for a best-case scenario but preparing for the worst: a so-called “fall peak” of COVID-19 cases across Canada that would threaten to overwhelm the public health care system.

PHAC officials said they were aiming for a “slow burn” scenario, in which the number of cases remains low enough for the public health care system to keep ahead of the influx of patients.

But officials also were planning for a “reasonable worst-case scenario” — a fall spike in infections followed by ongoing peaks and valleys that put excessive pressure on the health care system.

The recent rise in cases coincides with the flu and cold season, which could put added strain on hospitals and other health resources.

Health care workers have been working on the front lines for months now and are now bracing for a possible spike in hospitalizations, prompting concerns about potential burnout.

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Canada sees 1,307 new COVID-19 cases, marking highest daily increase since early May – Global News

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Canada added 1,307 new cases of the novel coronavirus on Monday, fueling worries that the country could be headed towards a second wave of the virus.

Provincial and territorial health officials also said 11 new fatalities had occurred, bringing Canada’s death toll to 9,228.

Monday marked the third straight day the country has reported more than 1,000 new cases of COVID-19.

The new infections also reflect the highest daily increase since May 6 when more than 1,400 new cases were reported.

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Read more:
Ahead of throne speech, Canadians see coronavirus pandemic, jobs as top concerns: Ipsos poll

Ontario reported 425 new cases of the virus on Monday, and health officials said two more people had died.

The new infections bring the province’s total caseload to 47,274. 

Since the pandemic began, a total of 3,580,343 tests have been administered in Ontario, and 41,146 have recovered after falling ill.

Quebec saw 586 new cases of COVID-19, and provincial officials said two more people had died after testing positive for the virus.

The new fatalities bring Quebec’s death toll to 5,804.






1:49
Coronavirus: Canadians should ‘redouble their efforts’ at preventing COVID-19 spread as national case count rises, Tam says


Coronavirus: Canadians should ‘redouble their efforts’ at preventing COVID-19 spread as national case count rises, Tam says

However, 59,131 have recovered from the virus, and more than 2,067,000 tests have been conducted. 

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New Brunswick added two new cases of the virus on Monday, but health officials confirmed no additional deaths had occurred.

So far, 191 people have recovered after contracting the virus, and 70,268 have been tested.

Health officials in Nova Scotia reported no new cases and said no new deaths had occurred.

A total of 1,021 people have recovered after contracting COVID-19 and 89,014 tests for the virus have been conducted in Nova Scotia.

Newfoundland did not report any new cases of the virus on Monday, either, and health authorities said the province’s death toll remained at three.

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Thus far, 38,118 tests for the virus have been administered, and 268 people have recovered. 

The latest data released by Prince Edward Island on Sept. 15 said the province has seen a total of 57 cases of COVID-19 but no deaths.

Read more:
Coronavirus took their lives. Here’s how their families will remember them

Saskatchewan health officials said seven new cases of the novel coronavirus were detected, but no one else had died.

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The province has seen 24 deaths since the pandemic began.

A total of 1,645 have recovered after falling ill with the respiratory illness, and 173,764 tests for the virus have been conducted in Saskatchewan.

In Manitoba, 22 new novel coronavirus infections were detected, and health officials said two more people had died.

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Since the virus was first detected 1,227 have recovered from COVID-19 infections.

Over 165,990 people have been tested for the virus in Manitoba.

Further west in Alberta, 137 new infections were reported, bringing the province’s case count to 16,739.

Health officials also said one new death associated with COVID-19 had occurred.

Since the pandemic began, 1,215,672 people have been tested for the virus, and 15,024 have recovered.

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British Columbia health authorities reported 128 new cases of the novel coronavirus, and said four additional deaths had occurred since Friday.






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Coronavirus: Dr. Tam explains what ‘manageable levels’ of COVID-19 in Canada might mean


Coronavirus: Dr. Tam explains what ‘manageable levels’ of COVID-19 in Canada might mean

The new infections bring the province’s total case load to 8,079. However, 5,797 have recovered from the virus.

So far, 455,395 tests for COVID-19 have been administered in British Columbia.

Territories

All five confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the Northwest Territories are considered to be resolved.

Health authorities have administered a total of 4,732 tests for the virus in the territory.

Similarly, in the Yukon, all 15 people who tested positive for the novel coronavirus have recovered.

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The latest data released by health officials on Thursday said 3,049 people have been tested for the virus.

Nunavut has seen three cases of the virus, however, each have been tied to workers from other parts of the country.

The territory says the infections will be counted in the totals for the workers’ home jurisdictions, meaning Nunavut still considers itself free of COVID-19 cases.

Read more:
Patio heaters won’t cut it. What will it take for restaurants to survive winter?

Global cases top 31 million

Since the novel coronavirus was first detected in Wuhan, China in December, it has infected 31,186,000 people and claimed 962,343 lives, according to a tally from Johns Hopkins University.

The United States remained the epicentre of the virus on Monday, with more than 6.8 million confirmed cases.

As of 8 p.m. ET, COVID-19 had claimed 199,816 lives in the U.S.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Student visa limbo leaves thousands unable to start school in Canada – CBC.ca

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Gustavo Camelo is one of thousands of international students stuck in limbo, ready to start college or university but missing one thing — a Canadian student visa.

The delays in documentation are due to travel restrictions brought in to protect Canadians from the spread of COVID-19. A spokesperson for Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) said the ministry is trying to smooth the process and reduce delays for international students.

International education as a sector contributes $21 billion a year to the Canadian economy.

Camelo completed his undergraduate degree at the University of São Paulo in Brazil and was all set to start his masters degree in chemistry at the University of Victoria this month.

He and his partner rented a $1,800-a-month Victoria apartment and couldn’t wait for September. 

But then came COVID-19. The border closed and new rules came into play for student visas as of March 18.

Even international students approved before March are not automatically allowed to travel to Canada. Foreign nationals with a valid study permit or letter of introduction dated before March 18 may still be denied entry if their reason for travelling is deemed “discretionary.”

Students must prove it’s necessary for their program for them to be on campus.

Approved for online studies

When Camelo applied on May 15, he said he faced a 27-week wait for processing. So far he has only been approved to begin studies online, but he said he needs to be on campus to do research in order to complete the program. He said if he doesn’t get to Victoria soon, he could lose his spot in the program. 

IRCC confirmed there are delays and, right now, restrictions are not being eased — that will depend on how well the virus is contained.

“In regards to processing times, COVID-19 has meant significant challenges continue to affect processing timelines and we are doing our best within existing limitations. Because there are so many different variables involved, we are unable to provide specific timelines at this time,” a spokesperson said Monday in an email.

The University of Victoria campus is a dream right now for some international students who can’t get their student visa approved. (Twitter/@UVicLib)

“It’s very stressful. It’s hard to have your plans frustrated,” Camelo said in a phone interview from the U.K., where he and his dual-citizen partner, Tom Crocker, are waiting for word from Canada.

In July, the pair spent thousands of dollars on flights from Brazil and Canada to meet up in London, as the U.K. was one of the only places they could get in and face only a 14-day quarantine.

They had been separated since December 2019 and the border restrictions kept being extended.

“The U.K. is the only country that has its borders open for anyone,” said Crocker.

After reuniting at an Airbnb in London, where they quarantined for 14 days, the couple are staying with Crocker’s family near Dorchester until they can finally move back to B.C., where Camelo’s British-born partner has lived for a decade.

Camelo said he has about a month before he loses his spot in the UVic program, despite his acceptance and the fact that he’s paid his tuition.

“I can lose the offer for sure. The university is expecting me to get there in a month or so. No one knows exactly what’s going to happen,” he said.

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