Connect with us

Art

Town modifies Art of Winter Festival with household/family activity passport – CollingwoodToday.ca

Published

 on


The Town of Collingwood’s parks, recreation and culture department has put together a list of outdoor and at home activities for residents to enjoy. 

Last year the town started the Art of Winter Festival to celebrate the snowy season with outdoor activities at Central Park. This year with COVID-19 related restrictions in place, staff planned a list of physical-distancing friendly activities to fill the festival bill. 

The Art of Winter festival runs Dec. 21 to Feb. 21. Residents can download a “passport” which includes a list of 40 self-directed activities that can be done at any pace. 

“To encourage residents to stay active and creative outdoors, even in the winter months, while still supporting all current public health recommendations, this Art of Winter Festival is being hosted over an 8-week period at multiple outdoor locations and is designed to be done on your own time, with your own household”, said Karen Cubitt, the town’s manager of culture and events. “Our intention is to make this a local festival and to discourage physical gatherings typically associated with special events by spreading people out over time and distance.” 

The activities are split into five themes. 

Under acts of random kindness, the town suggests leaving a kind note or sending a handwritten letter. 

For multi-generational fun, activity recommendations range from building a snow creature at Central Park to inventing a new winter sport in your backyard. 

There are several activities based on reflection and contemplation including a walk at the labyrinth, identifying local trees, building a birdfeeder and trying out snow painting. 

There are also ideas for physical activity such as taking a winter walk and playing winter bingo. 

Finally, there are culture and history activities like following a Collingwood historic walk, following and reading the winter story walk on the trail behind the museum, and borrowing a library book (as long as the library is open). 

Cubitt told CollingwoodToday in an email the activities were designed with grey/lockdown health and safety protocols in mind. Even if the region, or possibly the province, enters lockdown, most of the passport activities will still be available with adaptations for those connected to the library or museum. In those cases, curbside pickup of items could be arranged. 

The following information is from the town’s news release on the 2020/21 Art of Winter Festival:

Passports can be downloaded on the event website or picked up at the following locations. 

Downtown at: 

  • Town Hall (97 Hurontario Street) 
  • The Collingwood Museum (45 St. Paul Street) 
  • The Collingwood Public Library (55 Ste. Marie Street) 

Or at these additional Activity Hubs: 

  • Awen’ Gathering Place & Arboretum (north end of Cedar or Hickory Streets) 
  • Harbourview Park East (north end of Birch Street) 
  • Central Park (85 Paterson Street) 

The Town of Collingwood discourages travelling outside of your community at this time. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Winter wonderland: A look at snow art across Ottawa – CTV News Ottawa

Published

 on


OTTAWA —
This past weekend saw the biggest snowfall of the winter in the capital, and it wasn’t just any kind of snow. It was the sticky type, perfect for sculpting everything from snowmen, to dragons to igloos.

And people’s imaginations were running wild.

“We woke up Saturday morning and saw all the snow. The kids ate breakfast and raced outside,” says Ottawa resident Michelle McCombs. “It was the perfect snow for making a snowman.”

But just one or two snowmen weren’t good enough for the McCombs family. More than a dozen snowmen sit on their front lawn, greeting people as they pass.

“People have been stopping by all weekend. It kind of lifts your spirits up,” says McCombs.

Jayson Ambrose wanted to build a giant snowman, but instead built a little Buddha on top of a giant snowball. A perfect accident, he called it.

Jayson Ambrose snow Buddha

“I just kept playing with it and it ended up kinda looking like a little snowy laughing Buddha sitting on top of are giant snowball here,” he said.

Lindsay Hunter and her family needed a place to play checkers outside, so they built themselves what they call their Irish igloo, complete with tables and chairs.

Lindsay and Rosalie Hunter in snow fort

“We’re very tired of being inside all day,” says Hunter, “and when the beautiful snow came, which was the stickiest, best textured snow to make stuff, and on top of that it was warm out, we couldn’t help but spend all day outside.”

Many people around the city took to their yards, spending hours making snowy masterpieces and the talent was off the charts. 

But Daniel Benoit’s castle in Embrun is next level.

“We were doing it during lunch break, and then after dinner with the kids.” says Benoit. “After the kids go to bed, both of us go out and spend some time away from the TV screen or computer screen.”

Daniel Benoit snow castle in Embrun.

The Benoit family had been working on it for two weeks, and with all the snow that fell this past weekend, they were able to finally complete it. But they might not be done just yet.

“My wife was already taking about another tower or something so we’ll see,” says Benoit. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Winter wonderland: A look at snow art across Ottawa – CTV Edmonton

Published

 on


OTTAWA —
This past weekend saw the biggest snowfall of the winter in the capital, and it wasn’t just any kind of snow. It was the sticky type, perfect for sculpting everything from snowmen, to dragons to igloos.

And people’s imaginations were running wild.

“We woke up Saturday morning and saw all the snow. The kids ate breakfast and raced outside,” says Ottawa resident Michelle McCombs. “It was the perfect snow for making a snowman.”

But just one or two snowmen weren’t good enough for the McCombs family. More than a dozen snowmen sit on their front lawn, greeting people as they pass.

McComb's snowmen

“People have been stopping by all weekend. It kind of lifts your spirits up,” says McCombs.

Jayson Ambrose wanted to build a giant snowman, but instead built a little Buddha on top of a giant snowball. A perfect accident, he called it.

Jayson Ambrose snow Buddha

“I just kept playing with it and it ended up kinda looking like a little snowy laughing Buddha sitting on top of are giant snowball here,” he said.

Lindsay Hunter and her family needed a place to play checkers outside, so they built themselves what they call their Irish igloo, complete with tables and chairs.

Lindsay and Rosalie Hunter in snow fort

“We’re very tired of being inside all day,” says Hunter, “and when the beautiful snow came, which was the stickiest, best textured snow to make stuff, and on top of that it was warm out, we couldn’t help but spend all day outside.”

Many people around the city took to their yards, spending hours making snowy masterpieces and the talent was off the charts. 

But Daniel Benoit’s castle in Embrun is next level.

“We were doing it during lunch break, and then after dinner with the kids.” says Benoit. “After the kids go to bed, both of us go out and spend some time away from the TV screen or computer screen.”

Daniel Benoit snow castle in Embrun.

The Benoit family had been working on it for two weeks, and with all the snow that fell this past weekend, they were able to finally complete it. But they might not be done just yet.

“My wife was already taking about another tower or something so we’ll see,” says Benoit. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Online art course with Adrian Baker – Millstone News

Published

 on


NEW! Appleton Studio – online ‘ART MENTORING’ course

Instructor: Adrian Baker, BFA, MFA

Want to keep making art this winter, but could use a little guidance? I’m offering personal feedback sessions by email, one-on-one online meetings, and online group feedback sessions. Work on your own projects in your choice of medium, under the guidance of a professional artist. Receive valuable feedback from your peers. Flexible scheduling to suit your routine.

‘Art Mentoring’ runs from the week of January 18th to March 26 (choose your own times/days).

Cost is $180

What you get:

– Weekly personal assessment of your current art project via email, with constructive critiques and professional guidance. (eight sessions)

– One-on-one online meetings to discuss the progress of your work (six sessions)

– Online group feedback sessions with fellow participants (two sessions)

– Regular links to online painting tutorials relevant to your work.

What you do:

– Choose a project to work on in your choice of medium. Your first email session can be a discussion of what to paint, how to get started, colour & compositional decisions, etc.

– Photograph your artwork regularly as it progresses over the ten weeks and send the pictures by email for feedback from the instructor, for a total of eight email instructional sessions.

– Schedule six one-on-one meetings with instructor over the 10-week period (schedule of available days/times will be provided)

– Participate in two online group critiques (coffee, tea or wine are optional!)

– Have fun! Be creative! Keep on making art!

I am accepting a limited number of participants, so let me know asap if you are interested.

To register, or for more information:
613-257-4233
appletonstudio@gmail.com
www.adrianbakerart.com

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending