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Transcript released after Navarro says his comments on Canada's military taken 'out of context' – CTV News

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WASHINGTON —
Top Trump adviser Peter Navarro says his disparaging comments about Canadian soldiers who served alongside Americans in Afghanistan were taken out of context, despite being recorded on audio and published in a new book.

Navarro, an economist serving as director of the Office of Trade and Manufacturing Policy for U.S. President Donald Trump, appeared to question Canada’s contribution to the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan, where 158 Canadian soldiers died and more than 40,000 served over the 12-year operation following the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.

Navarro insists that his comments were not portrayed fairly in “The Madman Theory: Trump Takes On the World,” a new book by CNN chief national security correspondent Jim Sciutto, and that their conversation was about trade differences between Canada and the U.S. despite having shared national security goals.

However, a transcript of the interview, which was recorded by Sciutto and released to CTV News, shows that Navarro was the one who first brought up Canada’s military during a discussion about steel tariffs and the new NAFTA deal.

  • Read a transcript of the exchange between Navarro and Sciutto below

“To get USMCA, president had to get tough,” Navarro says. “He got tough. We got USMCA. So why should we give away our dairy industry and auto industry to Canada under a flawed agreement? That makes no sense. Just because you’re across the border and had served together with us and conflicts. I mean, every time that a Canadian shows up in a uniform, it’s doing us a favour or, I mean, how’s that work?”

Sciutto replies: “A lot of them died in Afghanistan.”

“Yeah,” Navarro says. “But yeah, but was it, were they doing us a favour or were they bought into the idea that they needed to do that as part of the global effort against terrorists? I mean if they were just doing us a favour, maybe their government should have been thrown out of office. Right?”

Sciutto then points out that Canada was not doing the U.S. “a favour” by sending in troops, but that the deployment was part of a historic move by NATO. Following the Sept. 11 attacks, NATO invoked the Article 5 “collective defence” clause for the first time ever, which prompted Canada and other nations to join forces with the U.S. from day one.

“My point here, Jim, is that, is that Jefferson said, ‘Men aren’t angels.’ Countries aren’t angels, but Mexico—”

Sciutto interjects: “But some are better than others, aren’t they? I mean, aren’t they? Is Canada Russia?”

“On a continuum certainly,” Navarro replies, “but we can’t tolerate Mexico facilitating illegal mass migration from the iron triangle. We can’t tolerate Canada for our dairy farms. I mean as a general proposition.”

‘EVERY CANADIAN SHOULD BE INSULTED’

In a statement to CTV News on Wednesday, Navarro says he was talking about trade grievances when the military was brought up.

“The remark is being taken out of context,” he said.

“The discussion itself centered around the fact that while the United States and Canada have strong shared national security interests in, for example, the war on terror, there are sharp trade differences between us. This administration greatly honors our veterans and those in uniform amongst our allies that defend democracy and freedom around the world, and the Trump Administration proves that every day. No one should ever doubt that.”

Canadian military brass called Navarro’s comments outrageous, with former Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier, who at one point commanded the NATO ISAF in Afghanistan, saying that “every Canadian should be insulted by comments like that.”

Since Navarro’s comments went public, Hillier said he’s been flooded with calls from U.S. counterparts who say they don’t share Navarro’s views.

Defence Minister Harjiit Sajjan also weighed in on Thursday.

“Canadians will not forget their sacrifice and having served alongside them, I know the American military and everyday Americans will not forget that Canada was there for them in their time of need,” he said.

Sciutto’s book, released earlier this month, offers a deeper look into how Trump’s unpredictable style of politics is alienating U.S. allies and empowering U.S. enemies.

Below is a transcript of the exchange between Navarro and Sciutto:

SCIUTTO: So, I get that approach in China because China is a perpetual bad actor, right? It’s always been cheating in a number of realms. I guess it just, when I see the same tactics…

NAVARRO: Germany’s a bad actor.

SCIUTTO: Germany or Canada or Mexico or South Korea.

NAVARRO: Well, I mean let’s take Canada. I mean what’s good about Canada their dairy having like the highest, well some of the highest dairy barriers to entry of any country in the world. I mean it’s like what’s good about that? What’s good about Canada being a transshipment point now for some of the Chinese stuff that we’ve got countervailing duties on? I mean it’s like this blue eyed brother kind of thing. People kind of look at it as, it’s just Canada has its own national interests and self-interests.

SCIUTTO: For sure. Every country does.

NAVARRO: And their ideology is really out of step with Trump world and they’re much more kind of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren in how they… We’d go to these summits and stuff like that and they’re sticking in all sorts of social experimentation into economics communiques. Wait a minute, what do you, we’re here to talk about how to… So I mean.

SCIUTTO: If you use the same cudgel with friends as you do with competitors is the question.

NAVARRO: No.

SCIUTTO: I mean didn’t we with Canada? Like steel tariffs.

NAVARRO: Look, look, look. To get USMCA, president had to get tough. He got tough. We got USMCA. So why should we give away our dairy industry and auto industry to Canada under a flawed agreement? That makes no sense. Just because you’re across the border and had served together with us and conflicts. I mean, every time that a Canadian shows up in a uniform, it’s doing us a favor or, I mean, how’s that work?

SCIUTTO: A lot of them died in Afghanistan.

NAVARRO: Yeah. But yeah … but was it, were they doing us a favor or were they bought into the idea that they needed to do that as part of the global effort against terrorists? I mean if they were just doing us a favor, maybe their government should have been thrown out of office. Right?

SCIUTTO: Well, they invoked the NATO charter.

NAVARRO: My point here, Jim, is that, is that Jefferson said, “Men aren’t angels.” Countries aren’t angels, but Mexico —

SCIUTTO: But some are better than others, aren’t they? I mean, aren’t they? Is Canada Russia?

NAVARRO: On a continuum certainly, but we can’t tolerate Mexico facilitating illegal mass migration from the iron triangle. We can’t tolerate Canada for our dairy farms.

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Canada adds 1,085 new coronavirus cases as Trudeau warns of second wave – Global News

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Canada added 1,085 new cases of the novel coronavirus on Wednesday, marking the fifth day in a row the country has seen a daily increase of more than 1,000.

The new infections bring the country’s total case count to 147,612.

Health authorities also said 10 more people have died after contracting the virus.

Read more:
Canada ‘on the brink’ of coronavirus surge, second wave underway in some regions: Trudeau

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Since the pandemic began, the virus has claimed 9,244 lives in Canada.

The new cases come as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said some regions in Canada are already experiencing a second wave of the virus.

“In our four biggest provinces, the second wave isn’t just starting, it’s already underway,” he said.

Trudeau made the comments during a rare evening address.

He urged Canadians to continue abiding by the public health measures including sticking to social bubbles, wearing a mask, washing hands frequently and continuing practicing social distancing.

“Together, we have the power to get this second wave under control,” he said.






2:57
Woman waits for 7 hours to get coronavirus test at Toronto hospital


Woman waits for 7 hours to get coronavirus test at Toronto hospital

The prime minister said it is “likely” Canadians will not be able to gather for Thanksgiving, but said “we still have a shot at Christmas.”

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Ontario reported 335 new cases of the virus on Wednesday, and health officials there said three more people had died.

The new infections bring the province’s total caseload to 48,087.

Since the pandemic began Ontario has tested 3,649,980 people for COVID-19, and 41,600 have recovered after falling ill. 

In Quebec, 471 new infections were detected, and health officials said one more person had died.

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Health authorities said three more deaths which occurred between Sept. 16 and Sept. 21, bring the provincial death toll to 5,809.

Read more:
New study finds 247 people brought COVID-19 to Quebec from abroad during March break 2020

However, 59,686 people have recovered from the virus in Quebec, and health officials have conducted 2,136,088 tests to date. 

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New Brunswick added one new case of COVID-19 on Wednesday, but officials said no one else had died.

The province has seen two deaths related to the virus so far.

A total of 191 people have recovered after contracting the respiratory illness, and 71,585 tests have been administered in New Brunswick.

Nova Scotia health officials said no new cases or deaths associated with COVID-19 had occurred.

So far 1,021 people have recovered after testing positive for the novel coronavirus, and 90,124 people have been tested.

Prince Edward Island saw one new case of COVID-19, marking the province’s first new infection since Sept. 16.

The new case brings Prince Edward Island’s total caseload to 58, however, 57 of those people have recovered. 

Provincial health authorities have administered 33,196 tests for the virus. 

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Coronavirus: Researchers identify the origins of COVID-19 infections in Quebec


Coronavirus: Researchers identify the origins of COVID-19 infections in Quebec

No new cases of COVID-19 were detected in Newfoundland on Wednesday, and provincial health authorities said the death toll remained at three.

Newfoundland has not recorded a new case of the virus since Sept. 18.

So far, 268 people have recovered from COVID-19 in the province, and 38,960 tests have been conducted. 

Forty-two new infections were reported in Manitoba, and health authorities said one more person had died after testing positive for the virus.

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To date, 1,238 people have recovered from COVID-19 in the province, and 170,045 people have been tested. 

Saskatchewan reported six new cases, but health officials said the death toll in the province remained at 24.

Thus far, 176,912 people have been tested for COVID-19 and 1,673 have recovered after becoming ill.

Read more:
40 people had a BBQ at an Ottawa park. Days later 105 people are quarantined for coronavirus

Alberta recorded 143 new infections, bringing the province’s total case count to 17,032.

Health officials there said two more people had died, pushing Alberta’s death toll to 260.

However, since the pandemic began, 15,252 people have recovered from the virus. 

A total of 1,242,263 people have been tested for COVID-19 in Alberta.

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Further west in British Columbia, 86 new infections were reported, but no new deaths have occurred.

Health authorities also reported five epidemiologically-linked, meaning they have not been confirmed by a laboratory.

So far, 6,769 people who contracted COVID-19 have recovered in B.C., and 483,979 tests have been administered. 

No new cases in the territories

None of Canada’s territories reported a new case of COVID-19 on Wednesday, and health officials confirmed no one else had died.

In the Northwest Territories, all five confirmed cases of the virus are considered resolved.

The territory has administered 1,673 tests for COVID-19.






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Throne speech: Payette touts coronavirus job creation, wage subsidy extension


Throne speech: Payette touts coronavirus job creation, wage subsidy extension

Meanwhile, Nunavut has seen three cases of the virus to date, however, each have been tied to workers from other parts of the country.

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The territory says the infections will be counted in the totals for the workers’ home jurisdictions, meaning Nunavut still considers itself free of COVID-19 cases.

The territory has tested 2,812 for the virus to date. 

All 15 confirmed cases of the virus in the Yukon are considered to be recovered.

Since the pandemic began, health officials have administered 59,686 tests. 

Global cases approach 32 million

COVID-19 was first detected in Wuhan, China late last year. Since then, it has infected a total of 31,759,233 people around the world, according to a tally from John’s Hopkins University.

As of 7 p.m. ET on Wednesday, the virus had claimed 973,904 lives worldwide.

Read more:
Coronavirus took their lives. Here’s how their families will remember them

The United States remained the epicentre of the virus on Wednesday, with over 6.9 million confirmed cases.

So far 201,861 Americans have died after contracting COVID-19.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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As caseloads spike in four provinces, Trudeau warns that pandemic will be worse this fall – CBC.ca

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In a rare televised national address, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau took to the airwaves tonight to warn that Canada is at a “crossroads” as COVID-19 cases spike in some provinces, and with pandemic conditions in the fall expected to be worse than what the country endured when the crisis was just beginning.

Canada entered an ordered shutdown of economic and social life in mid-March, when there were only a few dozen new cases being reported each day. Now, with 1,000 new cases reported nationwide yesterday, Trudeau said there can be no doubt that four of the country’s provinces — Alberta, B.C., Ontario and Quebec — are in the second wave of COVID-19.

“I know this isn’t the news that any of us wanted to hear. And we can’t change today’s numbers or even tomorrow’s … but what we can change is where we are in October, and into the winter,” he said.

“It’s all too likely we won’t be gathering for Thanksgiving, but we still have a shot at Christmas.”

Trudeau said that while the outlook is grim, Canada has the tools it needs to blunt the impact of a pandemic that has already claimed the lives of 9,200 people in this country.

“We have the power to get this second wave under control. I know we can do it, because we’ve already done it once before. In the spring, we all did our part by staying home. And this fall, we have even more tools in the toolbox,” he said.

Trudeau said Canadians must continue to wear masks where possible, limit social interactions — “It’s no time for a party” — and download the COVID-19 alert app so that those who test positive can anonymously alert close contacts.

“It’s a powerful, free tool that’s easy to use and protects your privacy,” he said.

Trudeau also sought to reassure Canadians that the government is working to procure the goods needed to get the country past this health crisis.

He said the government has signed billions of dollars worth of agreements to buy vaccines, therapeutics and personal protective equipment (PPE). Canada faced critical shortages of gloves, masks and gowns in the early days of the pandemic, after government agents failed to adequately supply the national emergency stockpile.

Beyond warnings about a projected spike in cases in the coming months, Trudeau used the second half of his 15-minute address to assure Canadians that the government will be ready to help them navigate the economic fallout — pointing to some of the policy proposals that were outlined in the speech from the throne this afternoon.

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole, who responded to Trudeau’s remarks from isolation after testing positive for the virus last Friday, said the Tories have lost faith in the government’s response to this pandemic.

“The situation facing my family shows we must remain extremely vigilant in our battle against the spread of COVID-19. We must also be very vigilant for the future of our country,” he said. His wife, Rebecca, has also tested positive.

He urged Trudeau to push Health Canada regulators to approve rapid testing devices to ease the pressure on hospital-run testing centres that have experienced hours-long lineups in some parts of the country.

While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved two antigen testing devices months ago — tests that can deliver results in less than 15 minutes — Health Canada has said it is not ready to put its stamp of approval on such tests.

Antigen tests — which, depending on the device, use matter collected from a nasal or throat swab — don’t require the use of a lab to generate results. The FDA has said such tests are a safe and reliable way to determine a person’s COVID-19 status.

“It is unacceptable that we trust countries like Japan, Germany and the U.S. with our national security intelligence but we don’t trust their approval of a 15-minute saliva test,” O’Toole said.

Government promises 1 million new jobs

Gov. Gen. Julie Payette delivered the government’s nearly hour-long address in the Senate chamber earlier today.

In that speech, the government pledged to create one million new jobs, extend the wage subsidy program until next summer, launch the largest jobs training program in the country’s history and begin to build a national child-care program to support working women.

The Liberal government also promised to push ahead with plans to create a universal pharmacare program with any provinces willing to take part.

Watch: Throne speech outlines Trudeau government’s plans for pandemic recovery

The government promised to pursue an ambitious environmental agenda to fast-track Canada’s efforts to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions through home retrofits and infrastructure spending, and through tax incentives for companies building zero-emissions products, like electric vehicles.

“The economic impact of COVID-19 on Canadians has already been worse than the 2008 financial crisis. These consequences will not be short-lived. This is not the time for austerity. Canada entered this crisis in the best fiscal position of its peers and the government is using that fiscal firepower,” the government said in the speech.

The Bloc Québécois and Conservative parties promised Wednesday to vote against the speech.

If NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and his caucus also vote against the speech, Canadians will be headed to the polls for a fall federal election.

Singh told reporters that he had not yet decided how his caucus will vote when it’s given the chance in the Commons in the days ahead.

“We’re going to take a lot of time to consider the throne speech and make sure we evaluate it and make a decision around whether we’re supporting or not,” he said.

He said he’s troubled by the Liberals’ pitch to do away with the Canadian emergency relief benefit (CERB) in favour of a revamped Employment Insurance (EI) system, warning it could hurt workers who have been forced to stay home because of the pandemic.

Conservatives say no

Conservative Deputy Leader Candice Bergen said the Tories cannot support the speech because it doesn’t address a major issue: Western alienation and national unity.

The speech said little about the oil and gas sector — an industry that has been hit hard by sinking oil prices and dwindling demand, leaving thousands jobless.

“There were no words that said, ‘We value natural resources, we value our forestry workers, we value our agricultural sector.’ They should have said all that and they didn’t. We were hoping for something better,” she said. “Conservatives continue to be the only party standing up for the West.”

The speech included big-ticket spending promises with no plan to pay for them — which Bergen dismissed as irresponsible.

“They’re still talking about how budgets will balance themselves, so it’s very, very concerning,” Bergen said, citing Trudeau’s claim from years back that a growing economy would reduce federal deficits.

Bergen said the speech offered little new material — “just grand gestures and empty promises” — and the prorogation of Parliament to deliver the speech was a naked attempt to shield the Liberal government from further parliamentary inquiry into the WE Charity scandal.

Asked if it was responsible to push Canadians closer to an election during a pandemic, Bergen said Canada is a democracy and Tories have the right to vote against a speech that fails to address their priorities.

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How COVID-19 worsens Canada's digital divide – CBC.ca

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Chawathil First Nation lies just 600 metres north of the Trans-Canada Highway in southwestern B.C., but it feels much more remote when you try to log onto the internet from here.

That’s apparent when, from behind a Plexiglas barrier at the band office, finance manager Peter John attempts to run an online speed test to measure the dial-up connection. 

It takes nearly two minutes for the page to load, and once it does, the meter shows the download speed is an agonizingly slow one megabit per second (Mbps)

With that kind of setup, it means students struggle with online classes, and the band can’t hold video meetings. 

“Everything they could get out of the internet, they’re not able to really get it because it’s not there,” John said.

When the pandemic thrust most school, work and services online, it further highlighted not just how essential the internet has become but also the urban-rural divide around access. 

The CRTC recommends that every household have access to broadband with download speeds of at least 50 Mbps, and the federal government has set a goal to have Canada-wide broadband by 2030

According to the CRTC, nearly 86 per cent of households overall have that level of service currently, but in rural areas only 40 per cent do. In First Nation communities, it’s estimated that just 30 per cent of households have internet connections with the recommended speed. 

And even while the connections in remote areas are often slower, the service tends to be more expensive.

Deanna John, a child-and-family advocate as well as a band councillor for Chawathil First Nation, said those in the community who have internet pay around $130 dollars a month, while others come to the band office after hours to see if they can tap into the building’s network. Some choose to take a 35-minute bus ride to Chilliwack to use the Wi-Fi at a coffee shop, she said. 

The limited internet has made it harder for residents to get health care.

John said the community’s doctor, who used to come about once a week before the COVID-19 pandemic, is unable to see patients online. Some residents have instead been driving to the nearby town of Agassiz for appointments.

Peter John and Deanna John stand in front of the Chawathil First Nation band office, where the only internet connection is dial-up over a dedicated phone line. (Briar Stewart/CBC News )

“I would like [the internet]  to be up and available … so we’re not struggling with our kids falling back on education and that we’re actually connecting our people to the mental health specialists out there,” said John. 

John said the band had been speaking with Telus about upgrading the internet but was told it would cost tens of thousands just to increase the speed at the band office. 

Federal funding

In the 2019 budget, the federal government announced $1.7 billion in funding to support high-speed internet in remote and rural areas: $1 billion is slated for a Universal Broadband Fund, for extending internet infrastructure; $600 million for satellites, which can help connect some of the most remote communities; and $85 million to top up an ongoing program called Connect to Innovate which helps fund specific community projects in rural and First Nation communities.

The Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA), a not-for-profit organization that manages the .ca domain and advocates for better internet service, says it is currently working with about 400 rural communities to map connection speeds neighbourhood by neighbourhood. The organization also runs a yearly $1.25-million grant program to help communities invest in projects including internet infrastructure. 

“Canada’s internet service providers have passed over a lot of communities because they’re just not worth it financially,” said Josh Tabish, corporate communications manager with CIRA. 

“This is where we need the government to step up.” 

He said experts believe it will cost up to $6 billion to roll out broadband across Canada and he believes the federal government needs to act faster. The application for the Universal Broadband fund has yet to open. 

Tabish said about one in 10 Canadian households have no internet connection whatsoever, and the pandemic has exacerbated the gap in connectivity between rural and urban areas. He said high-speed internet has become even faster in cities, while it has plateaued in remote areas. 

In the meantime, he said, those without it struggle with daily life. 

Spotty satellite connection 

In the hamlet of Ryder Lake, residents have been pleading for better internet for years. The community is made up of sprawling acreages and farms that stretch up a lush green mountainside in B.C.’s Fraser Valley. 

The landscape was one of the reasons Sheri Elgermsa and her family of six moved here despite the fact that only satellite internet is available. When CBC News visited, her family was only getting about nine Mbps download speed. 

WATCH | Family of 6 schedules online time due to slow speed, spotty service

Ryder Lake, B.C. resident Sheri Elgersma explains how managing her kids’ time online became even more complicated during this unusual school year. 0:57

“When we moved up here eight and a half years ago, the internet … was a social thing. It was nice-to-have,” Elgersma said. 

“Now it’s become essential.”

When schools were closed back in the spring and classes moved online, Elgersma had to sit down with her four children and work out a schedule, as the internet connection would only allow one person to be online at any given time. 

If there were any classes overlapping, she said, she would have to pick one over another. 

Her oldest son, Elijah, 18, was often the priority, as he was wrapping up his final year of high school. He is now enrolled in a university program and has online classes two days a week, but even with no one else in the house allowed online at those times, the internet is still an issue. 

“All of a sudden it kind of goes frozen and I miss half the stuff,” Elijah said. 

“It’s a little bit frustrating.”

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