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Transport Canada floats new user fee for pleasure craft – CBC.ca

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The recreational boating season is mostly over, but Transport Canada is floating a plan to expand the number of pleasure craft that require a licence, shorten the renewal period and introduce a user fee on those licences.

The proposed rule changes would provide the government with more information to identify the owners of recreational boats abandoned or wrecked in Canada’s lakes, rivers and oceans.

Transport Canada signalled its intention to amend the small vessel regulations in a presentation prepared for a virtual meeting of the Canadian Marine Advisory Council this week.

The user fee is undefined.

Pat Nelder of Boating Atlantic said the industry in this region is on board — so far.

“We have to pay to license cars,” she said. “We have to pay to license trailers. I don’t think it’s a big issue to license boats as long as they’re … very reasonable in the amount of money they want to charge.

“We also feel that it will support Transport Canada’s work that they do with our industry for safety and for the wrecked and abandoned boat program.”

The changes

Right now, only pleasure craft with an engine over 9.9 horsepower need a licence — and it’s free.

Proposals introduce a user fee and make a licence mandatory for any boat above six metres, regardless of engine size.

Transport Canada intends to end lifetime non-renewable licences and reduce the licence-renewal period from 10 years to five.

Pleasure boats under 9.9 horsepower don’t need a licence under current regulations. (CBC)

The amended regulations are expected to go to the treasury board in 2021. The federal cabinet committee oversees government financial management.

The new licence requirement would capture thousands of pleasure craft, including the 7.9-metre sailboat owned by Pat Nelder, which is powered by a 2.6-horsepower engine.

“It’s currently not licensed and it would probably ask me to license that particular boat, which I have no problem doing,” she said.

“But I don’t know how putting these boats under a licensing system would be policed. I mean, I’ve never been boarded by Transport Canada.”

Transport Canada declined to discuss its plans until the Canadian Marine Advisory Council later this week.

“All details will be presented for the public and stakeholders to review and comment at that time,” the department said in a statement.

Nelder said the recreational boating industry will raise the amendments with officials later this week.

“We want to know what the fee would include. Is it a fee for service for the licensing, plus a charge towards the wrecked and abandoned boats program?”

She said the user fee is better than the alternative — a luxury tax proposed by the Liberals in 2019 on boats, planes and cars over $100,000.

Most wrecks are from overseas

In Atlantic Canada, most pleasure boats are taken out of the water for the winter.

Boat yards along the coast are brimming with boats covered in shrink wrap this time of year.

Nelder said recreational boats that are wrecked and abandoned here generally come from overseas.

“The person may have run out of money and just abandoned the boat,” she said. “And those are the boats we see. The licensing system isn’t going to change that.”

She considers it the beginning of a consultation that could take several years.

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What Canada's hardest-hit provinces can learn from those that handled COVID-19 best – CBC.ca

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When epidemiologist Susan Kirkland opened a Halifax newspaper on Saturday, she was stunned. 

“Three protest rallies planned,” the Chronicle Herald headline read, in part.

“Oh, no,” the head of public health and epidemiology at Dalhousie University thought to herself. “Please don’t be anti-vaxxers or anti-maskers.”

As Kirkland read further, she realized they weren’t related to the pandemic at all. 

One was a rally for alleged victims of a pediatric dentist, a second to demand reparations for former residents of Africville and the third was an anti-war protest about an upcoming security conference. 

“Oh,” she said with relief. “Phew.” 

Critical juncture for Atlantic bubble

The situation in the Atlantic bubble has been like night and day from the rest of Canada. 

The four Atlantic provinces have managed to control the spread of COVID-19 through tight border restrictions, strict isolation of travellers and comprehensive tracing of outbreaks. 

But Kirkland says much of the credit also belongs at an individual level. 

“I do feel like the response from the public in the Atlantic region is different than other parts of the country,” she told CBC News. 

“I think there’s also a certain amount of pride that we have been able to maintain the bubble, and I don’t think that people want to see it change.”

Visitors explore Peggy’s Cove, N.S., on July 4. When the Atlantic bubble is operating, people in the four Atlantic provinces can move around the region without self-isolating. People from outside Atlantic Canada must self-isolate for 14 days upon arriving. (Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)

But it has changed, put on hiatus with the news Monday that Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador were pulling out of the bubble due to rising COVID-19 cases in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. 

Nova Scotia reported 37 new cases of COVID-19 Tuesday, its most in a single day since April 23. 

“I am worried. I think that we’re on the brink and at a very, very critical juncture,” Kirkland said. “This is the point where we either make it or break it. We’ll keep numbers low or they will, like everywhere else, just begin to escalate and skyrocket.

“The window is narrowing — but we still have the potential to get it under control.”

‘Squandered’ sacrifices in Alberta

Elsewhere in the country, people are facing a much different situation. 

Alberta is seeing COVID-19 cases skyrocket at an unprecedented rate, rising to more than 1,500 per day and even outpacing provinces such as Ontario despite only having a third of the population. 

“I’ve been worried for many weeks now,” said Dr. Leyla Asadi, an infectious diseases physician in Edmonton. “I don’t know what the next two weeks will bring.” 

Asadi says the situation in Alberta isn’t a result of individuals not following public health guidelines necessarily, but instead reflects that the province has been a victim of its own success. 

A man wears a mask in downtown Calgary on Oct. 30. On Nov. 14, Alberta broke 1,000 daily new cases of COVID-19 for the first time. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

When COVID-19 cases dropped to relatively low numbers in the summer, there was a reluctance to act on the part of the provincial government. 

“We had great success and maybe that resulted in our leadership questioning the models and, because crisis was averted, perhaps they thought that the models just weren’t accurate,” she said. 

“We’ve squandered our sacrifices from the summer, and now we’re in a really tough place.”

Premier Jason Kenney declared a state of emergency in Alberta Tuesday and implemented new public health measures to address the rising COVID-19 case numbers across the province, but stopped short of a lockdown. 

Most indoor social gatherings are prohibited, while outdoor gatherings, weddings and funerals can have a maximum of 10 people. Masks are also mandatory in all indoor work places in Calgary and Edmonton, but not provincewide. 

Unlike Nova Scotia, which instituted mandatory mask mandates on July 24 — a day when it reported no new cases — Alberta has hesitated.

Alberta’s daily reported COVID-19 cases now rival Ontario’s for the highest in the country, even though it has a third of the population. The province’s resistance to restrictions may be crumbling, but Alberta’s top doctor says a surge in hospitalizations is inevitable as cases ‘snowball.’ 2:02

Asadi, who was part of a group of experts who penned a letter to provincial leaders last month calling on them to put in place stricter restrictions, said before Kenney’s announcement that masks are “low-hanging fruit.”

“Having masks mandated provincially, that’s not going to negatively impact the economy in any way,” she said. 

“If we act earlier then the measures can be more targeted and can be shorter in time. But now, I can’t see anything other than a strict lockdown getting us out of trouble — and it won’t even get us out of trouble.” 

Reluctance to act ‘early and hard’ reason for surge

COVID-19 is spiralling out of control in many parts of the country, with a record high 5,713 cases in a single day this week.

Ontario and Manitoba also announced all-time high numbers of new COVID-19 cases, and millions of Canadians were plunged back into strict lockdowns in different parts of the country.

In response, Canada’s chief public health officer said provinces and territories need to be more proactive — and act sooner rather than later.

Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam talks to The National’s Andrew Chang about the holiday season and getting to the end of the COVID-19 pandemic. 6:31

It’s not only the number of cases that are worsening; it’s who is being infected.

“The other huge problem that we have now are the inequities associated with this pandemic,” said Dr. Allison McGeer, an infectious disease physician with Sinai Health System in Toronto.

“Part of the reason I think that we’re not paying as much attention as we should be to the harm is that the harm is not predominantly occurring to the people in power in our society.”

McGeer is watching the worsening outbreaks across Canada through the eyes of a microbiologist who has decades of experience in infection prevention and control.

“I’m a little bit worried about what’s going to happen in Alberta,” McGeer said. “I think we’ll be cancelling surgery again, probably in order to cope with the ICU load three or four weeks from now.”

Surgeries such as hip and knee replacements could be cancelled down the road, as it can take up to two weeks for symptoms of COVID-19 to appear.

Surgical oncologist Dr. Usmaan Hameed, centre, operates on a patient at North York General Hospital on May 26. Putting in measures sooner could help prevent surgeries from being cancelled. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

“The reason we’re having this surge is because we kept things open longer than we should have,” she said. 

“The more cases you have when you act, the longer it takes to slow down and regain control and the more trouble you’re in going forward. So if we had put in measures two weeks before we did, then we might not be cancelling surgery.”

McGeer also acknowledges that politicians in Canada can only re-introduce safety measures when their citizens are behind them.

“If politicians move and they don’t have the population with them, then it’s not going to work either.”

McGeer advocates for preventative measures such as testing, tracing and isolating individuals who test positive to keep COVID-19 case counts low.

“It’s very clear that if we had been able to start this outbreak early and hard with preventive measures, if we’d been able to do the contact tracing, if we’d been willing to put people up in hotels for quarantine, we might be where Newfoundland is now,” she said. “And that has huge rewards.”

Those tantalizing rewards could help reinvigorate Canadians outside the Atlantic provinces who face a resurgence of COVID-19 cases and the hospitalizations and deaths that could follow the holiday season. 

“I get how tired people are; I’m tired of it myself. But this is not about being tired,” McGeer said. “We just need to hold on until we can get vaccines, right? And they are coming.”

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Canada adds 4,889 new coronavirus infections as global cases near 60 million – Global News

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Canada added 4,889 new novel coronavirus infections on Wednesday, bringing the country’s total case count to 342,132.
Health authorities also said another 97 have died after contracting COVID-19, pushing the total death toll to 11,618.

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A total of 2,218 people in Canada remain hospitalized after contracting the respiratory illness, while 273,391 have recovered after becoming sick.

Read more:
Two shots. A waiting period. Why the coronavirus vaccine won’t be a quick fix

Speaking at a press conference on Tuesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the government has secured a deal with Eli Lilly to secure up to 26,000 doses of the pharmaceutical company’s therapeutic drug to treat COVID-19 patients.

“To keep Canadians safe, we need access to as many potential vaccines and treatments as possible,” he said.

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Trudeau added that Canada will have the option to purchase thousands more doses.

The prime minister also said Canada has signed “strong contracts” with various vaccine companies, adding that the government is “working closely with allies on ensuring that there is a free flow of delivery of contracts.”

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Click to play video 'Coronavirus: Canada’s top doctor says implementation of rapid tests up to provinces, territories'



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Coronavirus: Canada’s top doctor says implementation of rapid tests up to provinces, territories


Coronavirus: Canada’s top doctor says implementation of rapid tests up to provinces, territories

Trudeau said the leaders of the G20 nations discussed equitable access to a potential COVID-19 vaccine during the virtual summit last weekend.

“It’s really important to ensure that everyone gets access to vaccines around the world because no one place gets through COVID-19 until all places are done with COVID-19,” he said.

New cases in the provinces

In Ontario, 1,009 new cases were detected on Wednesday. The province also saw 14 new fatalities, bringing the death toll to 3,519.

Meanwhile, Quebec saw 1,124 new infections and 45 new deaths, pushing the total case count and death toll to 134,330 and 6,887, respectively. 

Between Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 646 new infections were reported.

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Manitoba saw 471 new cases and 12 new deaths, while Saskatchewan added 175 new COVID-19 infections.

However, health officials said no one else had died.

In Atlantic Canada, 44 new coronavirus infections were reported.

Read more:
‘Behaviour changed’: Emergency hospital visits fell 50% in early days of pandemic

Nova Scotia added a record 37 new cases, while New Brunswick saw five new infections.

Newfoundland and Labrador saw two new cases, while Prince Edward Island did not report any new infections.

None of the Maritime provinces reported any new fatalities related to the respiratory illness.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney declared a state of public health emergency on Wednesday, as 1,115 new cases and 16 additional deaths were reported.

The province is implementing more stringent measures for three weeks in order to stem the spread of the virus, including banning indoor social gatherings and expanding the holiday school break.

Meanwhile, British Columbia added 941 new COVID-19 infections, marking a new daily record.

Health officials in the province also said 10 more people have died.

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Cases rise in Nunavut

Ten new cases were detected in Nunavut on Wednesday, but health officials said no one else has died.

The new cases push the territory’s total case load to 144. So far, only two of those cases are considered to be recovered.

Read more:
For Canadians living abroad, a COVID-19 Christmas means difficult decisions

Neither the Yukon or Northwest Territories saw a new case or death related to the virus on Wednesday.

Global cases near 60 million

The total number of novel coronavirus infections around the world hovered below 60 million on Wednesday.

By 6 p.m. ET, there were a total of 59,597,658 confirmed cases of the virus globally, according to a tally from Johns Hopkins University.

So far, the virus has killed 259,372 Americans.

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Ford differentiates between Ontarians holding private gatherings and establishments defying COVID-19 rules – CBC.ca

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Premier Doug Ford drew a distinction between Ontarians flouting public health measures through private gatherings and establishments that openly defy the province’s COVID-19 rules Tuesday.

The remarks came in response to questions about at Toronto barbeque restaurant owner publicly vowing to keep his doors open amid the province’s lockdown for the city.

“They have to follow the rules. There can’t be rules for one group and not another,” he said at a news conference Tuesday, less forcefully than in other instances where the premier has come out swinging against people throwing large parties or weddings, for example.

“When it comes to private parties, that’s a different ball of wax,” Ford said. “I’m not going to get up here and start pounding the small business owner when the guy’s holding on by his finger nails. I differentiate between someone at home being reckless and having 100 people over and partying and renting a public storage place … that’s reckless.

“I don’t condone that he opened up but I feel terrible. My heart breaks for these guys … these business-owners, believe me. “But please, in saying all that, you’ve got to follow the protocols and guidelines.”

WATCH | Ford comments on Toronto BBQ restaurant vowing to stay open during COVID-19 lockdown:

Ontario Premier Doug Ford says the owner of a Toronto BBQ restaurant who opened for indoor dining in violation of provincial lockdown orders should follow the rules, and he says his ‘heart breaks’ for small business. 1:12

The restaurant was eventually ordered to shut down by the City of Toronto after bylaw officers, public health inspectors and police were called to the site, city officials said in a statement. 

Rapid testing begins, auditor general set to release report

The province also announced Tuesday that it has begun deploying rapid testing in long-term care homes, rural and remote areas — something the premier called a “gamechanger.”

The rapid tests, which can produce results in minutes rather than days, have been sent to 36 long-term care homes and 27 retirement homes, as well as some hospitals.

The testing kits are earmarked for a total of 22 hospitals, including two that are already using them, as well as remote
communities and some outbreak areas in hot-spot regions, the government said.

Some will also be sent to corporations such as Air Canada and Ontario Power Generation, while others will be used over several months in a pilot project involving private, public and non-profit sector employers to gauge the value of antigen testing on asymptomatic workers, the province said.

Ottawa began shipping the testing kits to the provinces late last month, but figuring out how to best put them to use has taken some time, and most jurisdictions are also verifying the results of rapid tests with a lab-based test.

The “gold-standard” COVID-19 tests need to be processed in a lab, which can take at least a day. Rapid tests can yield results right where the patient is tested but are generally considered less reliable than lab-based tests.

One type of rapid test looks for the genetic material of the novel coronavirus, as does the traditional lab version. The other looks for the specific markers the virus leaves on the outside of a cell, known as antigens.

Ford said the province will continue to deploy the 98,000 ID Now tests and 1.2 million Panbio tests it has received from the federal government in the coming weeks. Health Minister Christine Elliott says another 1.5 million Panbio tests are expected to arrive in Ontario next month.

The announcement comes as a data error resulted in an artificially low daily total of 1,009 new COVID-19 cases on Tuesday.

It also comes just one day before the province’s auditor general is set to issue a three-part report on the province’s pandemic emergency preparedness and its response to COVID-19, including lab testing, case management and contact tracing. 

A spokesperson for Health Minister Christine Elliott said that yesterday’s figure of 1,589 cases (which appeared to be a record high) inadvertently included eight-and-a-half extra hours worth of data from Nov. 22, meaning the total count was inflated. Today’s number adjusts for the mistake.

The new cases include 497 in Toronto, 175 in Peel Region and 118 in York Region. The seven-day average now sits at 1,395.

Other public health units that saw double-digit increases were:

  • Waterloo Region: 40
  • Windsor: 31
  • Simcoe Muskoka: 25
  • Ottawa: 19
  • Niagara Region: 19
  • Durham Region: 16
  • Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph: 16
  • Hamilton: 10
  • Thunder Bay: 14

[Note: All of the figures used in this story are found on the Ministry of Health’s COVID-19 dashboard or in its Daily Epidemiologic Summary. The number of cases for any region may differ from what is reported by the local public health unit, because local units report figures at different times.]

Testing falls to about half of capacity

Today’s additional cases include 270 that are school-related: 223 students and 47 staff. The Ministry of Education said in a statement that the figure is not a one-day increase. Rather it reflects cases identified in schools from 2 p.m. last Friday to 2 p.m. yesterday, and also some others that were not reported Friday because of professional learning days in some boards, including the Toronto public and Catholic boards.

There are currently 703 publicly-funded schools in Ontario, or about 14.6 per cent, with at least one reported instance of COVID-19. Four schools are closed due to the illness, including one in Windsor with 39 cases, the largest school-related outbreak in the province.

There are now 12,917 confirmed, active cases of the illness provincewide, a slight drop from yesterday as 1,082 cases were marked resolved today. 

The further infections in today’s update come as Ontario’s network of labs processed just 27,053 test samples for the novel coronavirus, and added 29,316 to the queue to be completed. There is currently capacity in the system for up to 50,000 tests daily. Meanwhile, the province reported a test positivity rate of 5.8 per cent.

The official COVID-19 death toll grew by 14, up to 3,519. So far this month, 374 people with COVID-19 have died in Ontario. 

Hospitalizations of people with COVID-19 also jumped, up 27 to 534. Of those, 159 are being treated in intensive care and 91 with ventilators. Public health officials have identified 150 patients in ICUs as the threshold for when unrelated surgeries and procedures are likely to be postponed because of burdens on the hospital system.

Meanwhile, a group of engineers, physicians and other professionals issued an open letter to the province Tuesday, calling for updated COVID-19 guidelines that emphasize the importance of ventilation when it comes to curbing the risk of spreading the virus

‘With winter approaching, our activities are moving indoors and it is therefore imperative that public institutions, workplaces and individuals understand the risk of aerosol transmission as well as the actions that can be taken to combat it,” the letter says.

Backed by 36 professionals, it also calls on the province to mandate and fund ventilation assessments and upgrades of settings like schools and long-term care homes, establishing ventilation standards for reopening, among other measures.

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