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Trudeau “all-in” moxie that has helped him win election after election

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In an exclusive interview with La Presse, published over the weekend, Justin Trudeau once again displayed the type of “all-in” moxie that has helped him win election after election.

Trudeau deliberately took aim at François Legault and his repeated use of the “notwithstanding clause.” That clause has prevented the courts from striking down discriminatory laws that remove Charter rights from Quebec minorities.

It’s been a long time coming and Trudeau has been justifiably criticized for not standing up to Legault. But when he says he’s going to ask the Supreme Court for a ruling, he knows exactly what type of over-the-top reaction he’s going to get from the Quebec premier.

It didn’t take long. In a series of incendiary tweets Saturday, Legault said that Trudeau’s musings were a “frontal assault” on Quebec democracy and the collective rights of Quebecers. No less!

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ALL POLITICS IS LOCAL

Back in November, when Ontario Premier Doug Ford had said he’d use the notwithstanding clause to shield a law that removed labour rights, Trudeau went after him hard.

As the saying goes: all politics is local. Trudeau has a very good nose for the sentiments of his key electorate in the GTA. Defending the Charter was pure Trudeau, and classic Liberal branding.

Ford was forced to back down. A clever populist, he knows how to “read the room.” He did score a direct hit with one very strong shot at Trudeau: Trudeau, in Ford’s view, was ”selective” in his defence of the Charter.

Everyone understood that Ford was, quite correctly, calling Trudeau out for his Janus-faced opposition to the notwithstanding clause. He’d attacked Ford, repeatedly, but largely given a pass to Legault.

Recent polling shows the Liberals trailing the Conservatives. Blip on the screen or substantive change, Trudeau is not going to take it lying down.

Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre spent the week in Quebec and actually spoke with a few reporters. His numbers are very low in La Belle Province but he’s obviously getting some good communications advice.

Polievre put in an engaging and successful performance on the year-ender of popular French political satire show “Infoman.” Last week, he immediately tweeted approval when Quebec’s post-secondary education minister lambasted cancel culture on campus. He’s learning fast.

In attacking Legault, Trudeau is making the type of bold move that defines him. Back in the 2015 campaign, when the party that I then led, the NDP, came out with a proposal to “decriminalize” marijuana Trudeau went all-in. In an impromptu speech in a park, (it was clearly his idea, not that of his handlers) Trudeau announced that he would fully legalize pot and regulate its sale. That’s one promise he did keep and by making it, he stole a lot of progressive thunder from us.

Poilievre doesn’t have the hole cards, those kept secret when playing poker, that Trudeau has when dealing with Quebec. Trudeau knows the secret handshake, the right tone and what’s real and what’s emotion. Despite his French name, Poilievre is a proud western Canadian who needs to be guided in this Terra Incognita east of the Ottawa River.

Were it not for a brazenly discriminatory question aimed at the Bloc leader during (of all things!) the English-language debate, during the last election, Trudeau would’ve probably had his majority. After that event, Quebecers closed ranks, the Bloc got a big boost in the polls and the rest is history.

Trudeau knows the game. He’s very good at it but he’s not the type of politician who’s easily told what to do. When his gut feeling is one way, he’s going to follow it.

The English-speaking community of Quebec numbers about one million. It has seen constitutionally guaranteed language rights unilaterally removed by Legault’s Bill 96 with no attempt by Trudeau to stop the clearly illegal move.

‘MUSIC TO THE EARS OF ANGLOPHONES’

That community, some of the most steadfast Liberal supporters, is also very nervous about Trudeau’s proposed reform of the Official Languages Act, Bill C-13. If enacted, that Bill could actually endanger the rights of anglophones to control and manage their school boards. It is ill-considered and has been meeting fierce resistance from both the community and from a half-dozen Liberal backbenchers, including influential former minister Marc Garneau.

Trudeau’s announcement of an impending referral to the Supreme Court will be music to the ears of anglophones but they should wait to see the fine print. Justice Minister David Lametti has not lifted his little finger to defend the Canadian constitution. In fact, when Legault claimed to have unilaterally amended the foundational constitution, the “B.N.A. Act”, to remove the equality of English and French before the courts in Quebec, Lametti said it was all right!

Legault’s fireworks over the weekend were as predictable as they were exaggerated. Trudeau once used the words “perfect foil” to describe the senator he bested in a boxing match. Legault is about to become his “perfect foil” as we ramp up to the next election.

Trudeau will enjoy very large support for his challenge in and around Montreal. Far from hurting him, his impending battle with the Quebec Premier will boost his seat count. The average Quebecer cares a lot more about Trudeau’s promise to improve funding for a crumbling health-care system than they do about constitutional quarrels.

Trudeau used the word “innovative” to describe Ford’s plan to increase the use of private clinics to deliver what would still be completely free, provincial health care.

‘FERRARI PRICES FOR A RUSTING OLD STATION WAGON’

Our system is broken and the public understands that when what you’re doing doesn’t work, then you have to try something else. As one observer put it, we’re paying Ferrari prices for a rusting old station wagon. We can’t avoid this debate and by putting himself on the same page as the premiers, Trudeau is himself showing realism and flexibility.

Far more importantly, he’s listening to Canadians who are fed up with excuses about our failed health-care system. Quebecers are on the same page and when the two separatist parties criticized Legault for making a deal with Trudeau, they were totally ignored.

Trudeau seems to sense the sea change and can’t resist the temptation to take on Poilievre. He’s now in his eighth year in power with a “best before” date in full view. He knows that he’s pushing his luck asking for another mandate because Canadians have a healthy aversion to keeping their eggs in one basket for too long.

The Liberals have top-notch players such as Chrystia Freeland, Mark Carney and Anita Anand waiting in the wings. No one will be pushing Trudeau towards the exit, they owe him too much. But the longer he waits, the trickier it will become for him, especially if his polling numbers continue to flag.

Taking on Legault is a risky, clever and bold move that will be impossible for Poilievre to follow. Trudeau is betting a lot on this one.

Tom Mulcair was the leader of the federal New Democratic Party of Canada between 2012 and 2017

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Alberta Justice spokespeople deliver duelling statements on prosecutor email review

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Alberta premier's prosecutor

An email probe into whether Alberta Premier Danielle Smith’s office interfered with Crown prosecutors took a confusing turn Friday after two government spokespeople delivered duelling statements that raised questions over how far back the search went.

The review was ordered by Smith a week ago to respond to allegations in a CBC story that reported a staffer in the premier’s office emailed prosecutors last fall to question decisions and direction on cases stemming from a blockade at the Canada-U. S. border crossing at Coutts, Alta.

The Justice Department said Monday it had done a four-month search of ingoing, outgoing and deleted emails and found no evidence of contact.

Two days later, Alberta Justice communications director Charles Mainville said in a statement that deleted emails are wiped from the system after 30 days, meaning the search for deleted emails may not have covered the entire time period in question.

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On Thursday night, Ethan Lecavalier-Kidney, a spokesman for Justice Minister Tyler Shandro, responded to questions about Mainville’s statement. He said while emails are deleted after 30 days, they live on in the system for another 30 and could have been checked that far back by investigators.

“For example, if an email was deleted on Oct. 17, 2022, the email would no longer be accessible to the user as of Nov. 16, 2022, but would continue to be available to our investigation team until Dec. 16, 2022,” said Lecavalier-Kidney in his statement.

A 60-day search would have stretched back to late November, capturing all but the first six weeks of Smith’s United Conservative Party government. Smith was sworn in as premier on Oct. 11.

But while Lecavalier-Kidney’s statement said investigators could go back 60 days, it did not state that they did so, leaving confusion on how far back they went.

When asked Friday to clarify whether investigators went back 30 or 60 days on the deleted emails, Lecavalier-Kidney did not respond to questions while Mainville reissued the original statements in an email.

The government has also delivered conflicting messages on who was investigated in the review.

Smith promised that emails from all Crown prosecutors and the 34 staffers in her office would be checked.

However, the Justice Department later said emails between “relevant” prosecutors and Smith staffers were checked. It did not say how it determined who was relevant.

The Coutts blockade and COVID-19 protest at the border crossing last year saw RCMP lay charges against several people, ranging from mischief to conspiracy to commit murder.

Smith has said she did not direct prosecutors in the Coutts cases and the email review exonerated her office from what she called “baseless” allegations in the CBC story.

The CBC has said that it has not seen the emails in question but stands by its reporting.

The Opposition NDP said questions stemming from the CBC story, coupled with multiple conflicting statements from the premier on what she has said to Justice Department officials about the COVID-19 cases, can only be resolved through an independent investigation.

Smith has given six versions in recent weeks of what she has said to justice officials about COVID-19 cases.

Smith has said she talked to prosecutors directly and did not talk to prosecutors directly. She has said she reminded justice officials of general prosecution guidelines, but at other times reminded them to consider factors unique to COVID-19 cases. She has also suggested the conversations are ongoing and that they have ended.

She has attributed the confusion to “imprecise” word choices.

Smith has long been openly critical of COVID-19 masking, gathering and vaccine mandate rules, questioning if they were needed to fight the pandemic and labelling them intolerable violations of personal freedoms.

She has also called those unvaccinated against COVID-19 the most discriminated group she has seen in her lifetime.

Last fall, Smith said charges in the cases were grounded in politics and should be open to political solutions. But she recently said it’s important to let the court process play out independently.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 27, 2023.

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Trudeau government dropped the ball on fighting abuse in sport, former minister says

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A Liberal MP and former sport minister is again calling for a public inquiry into abuse in sport — and is accusing her own government of not doing enough to tackle the problem.

Kirsty Duncan said the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau failed to build momentum behind her efforts to prevent harassment, abuse and discrimination in sport in the years after she left cabinet — despite knowing a lot about the problem well before Hockey Canada’s handling of sexual assault allegations exploded in the news last year.

Duncan said she even faced “pushback” from people within her own government when she made tackling abuse a top priority of her time as sport minister.

Duncan said she would not identify the individuals who resisted her efforts, or state whether they were in her own office or other government departments.

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“It should not be a fight. I’m asking for the protection of athletes and children. There should never have been pushback,” Duncan told CBC News in an exclusive interview.

“I will not stand idly by while there are athletes, children and young people hurting in this country. And I do not accept the status quo. And if I do not push for an inquiry, it means accepting the status quo. And I will not be complicit.”

On Thursday, Duncan announced she’s taking medical leave effective immediately on the advice of doctors to deal with a physical health challenge.

Duncan was not re-appointed to cabinet by Trudeau after the 2019 election. She was instead appointed deputy House leader for the government.

Trudeau dropped the position of sport minister from cabinet at the time and folded Duncan’s responsibilities into the portfolio of the heritage minister, Steven Guilbeault.

Guilbeault’s ministerial mandate letter — which outlined his key policy objectives — charged him with fostering a culture of safe sport.

‘Other priorities’

In response to questions from CBC about the progress Guilbeault made on that mandate, his office pointed to a Sport Canada timeline of safe sport initiatives in the country.

The department launched a call for proposals to implement a new independent safe sport mechanism in 2020. In July 2021, Guilbeault announced that the Sport Dispute Resolution Centre of Canada (SDRCC) would receive up to $2.1 million to set up a new mechanism to oversee implementation of a new universal code of conduct in sport.

Then-minister of Canadian Heritage Steven Guilbeault responds to a question in the House of Commons on Nov. 3, 2020. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)

A senior government source with knowledge of Guilbeault’s portfolio concedes “other priorities required more attention” when he was heritage minister. Guilbeault’s legislative priorities at the time including confronting online abuse, digital streaming regulation and copyright reform.

The source, who spoke to CBC News on the condition of confidentiality, said the department’s priorities shifted when the pandemic hit in March 2020, just four months after Guilbeault was appointed minister. The source said they “totally understand” Duncan’s claim that more could have been done on safe sport.

“Since 2016, our government has worked with the sport community to advance a respectful sport culture and respond to calls for action,” Guilbeault’s office wrote in an email to CBC News.

 

Former sports minister says leaders ‘want to do better on preventing abuse in sport

 

Former sport minister and Liberal MP Kirsty Duncan says leaders in sports ‘welcome scrutiny.”

Duncan said she felt her safe sport initiatives were not given the attention they deserved after she left the office.

“There was nothing in place. There was literally nothing. There didn’t even seem to be policies. Some had policies, some didn’t,” she said. “Where was the oversight? Where was the accountability?

“I think what we’ve seen over the last four years, and we’ve certainly seen this summer, is that there remains a hugely disappointing resistance to change.”

Current Sport Minister Pascale St-Onge was asked about Duncan’s claim that the government isn’t doing enough to protect athletes in the country.

“I can tell you that we’re taking it extremely seriously,” she told CBC News.

“That’s why we’ve invested $16 million in the last budget just to create the Office of the Sport Integrity Commissioner, because we felt it was so important to have that independent mechanism. I’m also making it mandatory for all nationally funded organizations to sign up with those before the next funding cycle.

“So any organization that hasn’t protected their athletes by signing up with OSIC will no longer receive the whole funding. That’s the strongest tool that I have. So yes, we are taking this extremely, extremely seriously.”

 

Sports Minister Pascale St-Onge says government taking safe sport file ‘extremely seriously’

 

Sports Minister Pascale St-Onge says her office made it mandatory for nationally funded organizations to sign up with the Office of the Sport Integrity Commissioner in order to receive government funding.

Just weeks after Duncan was named sport minister in January 2018, an investigation by CBC News revealed that at least 222 coaches involved in amateur sports over 20 years had been convicted of sex offences involving over 600 victims under age 18.

Duncan — a former gymnast who said she experienced emotional and psychological abuse herself as an athlete — said she was shaken by that report.

She introduced a number of measures — “broad strokes,” she calls them now — such as a third-party investigation unit and a national toll-free confidential helpline for victims and witnesses of abuse in sport. She also brought territorial and provincial sport ministers together in February 2019 to sign a declaration aimed at tackling and preventing harassment, abuse and discrimination in sport.

“I knew I had to address the grassroots. That’s where most athletes will spend their life,” Duncan said.

“Safe sport needs to be on every federal, provincial, territorial meeting year after year after year, with real goals and deliverables. I talked a lot about numbers. How can we address a problem if we don’t know what that problem looks like?”

Reluctance in government

In the 2019 federal budget, the government committed $30 million over five years “to enable Canadian sports organizations to promote accessible, ethical, equitable and safe sports.”

But Duncan says there was a climate of resistance to policies she was introducing, both within and outside the government.

“I don’t think people understood the problem. There wasn’t a lot of interest in Parliament. I asked what we were doing and I was told that we had to stop this safe sport stuff and get back to what sport was really about,” she said, referring to celebrating sporting achievements.

“My answer was, ‘So not protecting children?'”

CBC News reached out to the Prime Minister’s Office but they declined to comment.

‘Resistance in the system’: Duncan said Hockey Canada resisted attempt to investigate allegations of abuse

 

Liberal MP Kirsty Duncan says there shouldn’t be any “pushback” from organizations over investigating claims of abuse from athletes.

Duncan said a three-page letter sent by Hockey Canada to one of her senior policy advisers reflects the tone of the opposition she faced.

The letter, first reported by the Canadian Press, was written by Glen McCurdie, then Hockey Canada’s vice-president of insurance and risk management. In it, McCurdie expressed concern about some of the policies Duncan was pursuing, including the third-party investigation unit.

Glen McCurdie, Hockey Canada’s former vice-president of insurance and risk management, appears as a witness at the standing committee on Canadian Heritage in Ottawa on July 27, 2022. The committee was looking into how Hockey Canada handled allegations of sexual assault and a subsequent lawsuit. (The Canadian Press)

Duncan said she never saw the letter four years ago and only read it for the first time this past summer, when the Hockey Canada controversy was playing out.

“Hockey Canada does not wish to be encumbered by a system or process that ties our hands and does not allow us to manage a situation as we deem necessary. We are simply asking that you keep this in mind as you continue to lead us in a collective Safe Sport strategy,” McCurdie wrote in the letter, which was also obtained by CBC News.

Duncan said she was frustrated in 2019 by Hockey Canada’s reluctance and remains just as frustrated today.

“Hockey Canada pushed back against a third party investigator and a safe sport helpline. Who would do that?” she said. “Who wouldn’t want a child to be able to pick up a phone and say, ‘I’ve had a problem’?

“I think people want to sweep this under the rug. I think people want to move on. And we can’t.”

In an email to CBC, Hockey Canada said the 2019 letter does not reflect the organization’s current thinking or direction.

“Hockey Canada recognizes that we need to do more to foster a safe and positive environment for all participants on and off the ice,” the organization wrote.

Hockey Canada said the organization participated in the government’s safe sport helpline and hired third-party investigators to look into the claims it received. Hockey Canada became a full signatory in October 2022 to the Office of the Sport Integrity Commission, which is now responsible for overseeing and investigating allegations of abuse in sport.

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Canadian police chiefs speak out on death of Tyre Nichols beaten by Memphis, Tennofficers

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Canadian police chiefs condemned on Friday the death of Tyre Nichols who was savagely beaten by Memphis, Tenn police during a traffic stop in the United States, saying the officers involved must be held accountable.

The condemnation of the actions that led to Tyre Nichols’ death came as authorities in Memphis, Tenn., released a video of what happened.

The footage shows officers holding Nichols down and striking him repeatedly as he screamed for his mother.

After the beating, officers milled about for several minutes while Nichols lay propped up against a car, then slumped onto the street.

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Nichols died three days after the Jan. 7 confrontation. The officers, all of whom are Black, were charged Thursday with murder and other crimes.

Chief Myron Demkiw of the Toronto Police Service offered sincere condolences to Nichols’ family and friends. He said the actions of the officers in Memphis will have long-standing impacts on communities in Toronto and would have a disproportionate effect on some members of the Black community.

“I am profoundly saddened by the murder of Tyre Nichols in Memphis, Tennessee,” Demkiw said in a post on Twitter. “On behalf of the Toronto Police Service, I condemn the violent actions of the officers involved.”

The Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police called the circumstances of Nichols’ death “horrific and highly disturbing,” and offered condolences to his loved ones.

“(Officers’) duties must always be done in a manner that is transparent, professional, and upholds the high standards of policing as a profession,” the association said in a statement. “Every officer understands that they are accountable for their actions.”

The Ottawa Police Service said Nichols’ death and similar tragedies destabilize communities and undermine trust in police across North America.

“Nichols’ death, like so many before him, is tragic,” Ottawa police said. “We join in the calls for justice, and we support the steps being taken to fully investigate the incident and hold the individuals accountable.”

The chiefs of Peel police, Windsor police and Regina police also issued statements to condemn the actions of the officers charged in Nichols’ death.

Peel police chief Nishan Duraiappah said the death of Nichols was “deeply disturbing,” and that his thoughts were with the man’s family and community.

Windsor police chief Jason Bellaire said Nichols’ death and similar events affect “police credibility” globally, and it will take the police a long time to rebuild relationships and restore trust with the community.

He said his force will work with any community groups that want to plan peaceful protests in response to Nichols’ death.

Regina police chief Evan Bray called the death of Nichols “tragic and unnecessary” in a video posted on Twitter.

Bray said he reached out to leaders from his city’s Black community to express his sympathy and noted that Nichols’ death brings up “all kinds of heartache and trauma.”

The Edmonton Police Service called the death of Nichols a tragedy and said what happened in Memphis does not reflect police work in any form.

“There is no avoiding that the five officers, now charged with second-degree murder and other charges, were on duty when they committed this act,” the service said in an email.

“EPS (Edmonton Police Service) supports the swift and decisive action taken by the Memphis police in seeking justice for Mr. Nichols and his family.”

Given the likelihood of protests, Memphis Police Director Cerelyn Davis said she and other local officials decided it would be best to release the video later in the day, after schools were dismissed and people were home from work.

Nichols’ mother, RowVaughn Wells, warned supporters of the “horrific” nature of the video but pleaded for peaceful protests.

“I don’t want us burning up our city, tearing up the streets, because that’s not what my son stood for,” she said. “If you guys are here for me and Tyre, then you will protest peacefully.”

The officers each face charges of second-degree murder, aggravated assault, aggravated kidnapping, official misconduct and official oppression. Four of the five officers had posted bond and been released from custody by Friday morning, according to court and jail records.

Second-degree murder is punishable by 15 to 60 years in prison under Tennessee law.

As a precaution, Memphis-area schools cancelled all after-class activities and postponed an event scheduled for Saturday morning. Other early closures included the city power company’s community offices and the University of Memphis.

Davis said other officers are still being investigated for violating department policy. In addition, she said “a complete and independent review” will be conducted of the department’s specialized units, without providing further details.

Two fire department workers were also removed from duty over Nichols’ arrest.

— With files from The Associated Press.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 27, 2023.

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