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Trudeau calls China’s sentence on Spavor ‘unacceptable and unjust’

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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has called China’s conviction and sentencing of businessman Michael Spavor “unacceptable and unjust,” according to a statement early on Wednesday.

 

(Reporting by Bhargav Acharya in Bengaluru; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

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Daughters of murder victim call on feds to act in light of Winnipeg killings

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The daughters of an Indigenous woman police believe to have been the victim of a serial killer were on Parliament Hill this morning, calling on the federal government to take action.

Police believe Morgan Harris and three other Indigenous women in Winnipeg were murdered by the same man, who has been charged with four counts of first-degree murder.

Winnipeg police also say they think three of the victims’ bodies may be in a landfill, but they don’t plan to do a search because the area is too large.

Harris’s daughters, Cambria and Kera Harris, say the government needs to end violence against Indigenous women, girls and two-spirit people.

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The chief of Long Plain First Nation, where two of the four victims are from, is calling for resources for her community such as a 24-7 safe space for women.

Harris’s daughters also say if police won’t conduct a search to find their mother, they will.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 6, 2022.

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Flu spread is starting to hit older adults

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Doctors say influenza spread is starting to hit older adults as surveillance levels indicate the hospitalization rate of seniors is not that far behind that of children.

Data from the Public Health Agency of Canada for the week ending Nov. 26 show that children under five still made up the highest number of hospitalized flu patients, but the rate at which people 65 years of age and older are hospitalized is also rising.

Hospitalizations among both young children and seniors have increased sharply over recent weeks during a flu season that started earlier than usual.

Infectious diseases specialist Dr. Isaac Bogoch says he’s already seeing more seniors with flu as in-patients at Toronto General Hospital.

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Bogoch says there’s a perfect storm of a monster influenza season without enough people getting the flu shot, while hospitals are overstretched.

Dr. Matthew Oughton, an infectious diseases specialist at Jewish General Hospital in Montreal, says in most years, children tend to get the flu first and then bring it home to parents and grandparents — and that hospitals in his province are on the cusp of seeing that impact.

Both doctors are urging people to get the shot, saying it’s not too late.

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Most unused COVID-19 vaccines will expire at the end of the year: auditor general

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Tens of millions of doses of COVID-19 vaccines are likely about to expire and go to waste because of a failure to manage an oversupply, Canada’s auditor general reported Tuesday — a failure with an estimated price tag of about $1 billion.

Karen Hogan has released the results of her office’s investigation into the government’s efforts to get ahold of COVID-19 vaccine doses in the early days of the pandemic, and track how many people got them.

The auditor gave the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Procurement Department a thumbs up when it came to quickly getting enough doses into the country to meet vaccination goals, but said the government did a much poorer job of managing all that supply.

“We found that the Public Health Agency of Canada was unsuccessful in its efforts to minimize vaccine wastage,” Hogan wrote in the report.

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The government knew that by signing advanced purchase agreements with a number of pharmaceutical companies there was a risk of buying up more COVID-19 vaccines than Canadians needed.

PHAC and the federal government signed deals with seven companies that were developing vaccines in 2020 and 2021, in case only a few them were approved by Health Canada.

So far six of those have been authorized by the drug review agency.

“In my view, it was a prudent approach given all the uncertainty back in 2020,” she said at a press conference Tuesday.

The auditor found that about half of the 169 million doses the government paid for have made it into the arms of Canadians between December 2020 and May 2022.

The federal government announced plans to donate some 50 million surplus doses to other countries, but as of May 31 only about 15 million had been given away and another 13.6 million expired before they could be donated.

Canada has offered the remaining 21.7 million doses to other countries but so many countries are now offering donations that the market is saturated, Hogan said, and those vaccines will be wasted if they are not distributed soon.

There were also 32.5 million doses in federal and provincial inventories by the end of the audit period in May, worth about $1 billion, based on the auditor’s estimate.

Hogan said in her report that the majority of those doses will expire by the end of 2022.

Hogan said the public health agency informed her that another 10 million have expired since the end of the audit and another 11 million were donated.

Part of the problem, she said, was that provinces and territories did not communicate and share data with PHAC.

“Although some provinces and territories consistently reported to the agency, the agency was unable to obtain complete data from most. This meant that the status of these doses was unknown and reduced the agency’s ability to predict supply needs and plan for donations,” the report said.

The auditor general’s office and the public health agency itself warned for a decade before the COVID-19 pandemic that there were serious gaps in the federal and provincial health data-sharing plans.

In January 2021, Deloitte Inc. was awarded a $59.1 million contract to come up with a national vaccine management system called VaccineConnect to share timely information about vaccine distribution, coverage and safety.

Some elements of that program were up and running on time, but others were delayed and the auditor found that PHAC was instead using spreadsheets to manually track expiration dates and waste as of June 2021.

The information silos made it difficult for vaccine companies to monitor national safety indicators of their products, as they’ve been ordered to by Health Canada.

“Companies cannot entirely fulfil this requirement when they do not have access to the necessary data on adverse events,” the report said.

Hogan found two incidents in 2021 where companies learned of adverse effects to their vaccines from the media and urgently requested the data from the government, but couldn’t get access to it for three months.

Canada is also the only G7 country that does not follow World Health Organization guidance to share case-level information about patients who have adverse effects after immunization, and instead sends only summary data.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 6, 2022.

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