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Trump administration to cap number of employees at Chinese media outlets in U.S. – National Post

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WASHINGTON — The United States on Monday said it was slashing the number of Chinese employees permitted to work at the U.S. offices of major Chinese state-owned media outlets to retaliate against Beijing over its “long-standing intimidation and harassment of journalists.”

Citing a “deepening crackdown” on all forms of independent reporting inside China, administration officials said Beijing’s attack on free speech was worse than it was a decade ago, comparing it to that of the Soviet Union at the height of the Cold War.

China last month revoked the visas of three Wall Street Journal reporters in Beijing after the newspaper declined to apologize for a column with a headline calling China the “real sick man of Asia.” Another reporter with the paper had to leave last year after China declined to renew his visa.

“For years, the government of the People’s Republic of China has imposed increasingly harsh surveillance, harassment, and intimidation against American and other foreign journalists operating in China,” U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a statement.

Effective March 13, Washington will be capping the number of U.S. based employees of Xinhua News Agency, China Global Television Network, China Radio International, China Daily Distribution Corp to a total of 100, from 160.

Monday’s decision was not particularly linked to the Wall Street Journal case, senior state Department officials, speaking on the condition of anonymity, told reporters.

“We’ve been imploring the Chinese for years and years now to improve their treatment of journalists in China. So, this is not linked to any one particular incident,” one U.S. official said, but added that the expulsion of Journal reporters was a “fairly egregious” example.

The four outlets were among five designated by the United States as foreign embassies earlier this month, as a first step of this move.

Tensions between the two superpowers have escalated since President Donald Trump came to office three years ago, with disputes over issues ranging from trade to accusations of Chinese spying in the United States and to U.S. support for Taiwan.

On Monday, the Foreign Correspondents Club of China said in a report that the Chinese government has “weaponised” visas as part of a stepped-up campaign of pressure on foreign journalists.

“It is our hope that this action will spur Beijing to adopt a more fair and reciprocal approach to U.S. and other foreign press in China,” Pompeo said, while State Department officials said Washington was ready to take further action if Beijing retaliated.

“If in fact they decide to take this in a further negative direction however of course..all options would be on the table. I can’t tell you what in particular we would do, but we’d sit down review the circumstances and then consider all of our options,” the official said.

The personnel caps would be placed on the entities as opposed to people hence it would be up to the media outlets to decide the necessary staffing cuts, the officials said.

While the United States will not be sending anyone back, the officials acknowledged that the Chinese individuals whose visas are contingent on their ability to work in the United States may be forced to leave the country.

The United States would also be announcing in near future limits on duration of stay for Chinese citizens, administration officials said. (Reporting by Humeyra Pamuk and Steve Holland Editing by Alistair Bell)

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Glenn Greenwald resigns from the Intercept over 'editorial freedom' – The Guardian

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Glenn Greenwald resigns from the Intercept over ‘editorial freedom’  The Guardian



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QYOU Media Board Chair Exercises 2 Million Warrants

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/NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO UNITED STATES NEWSWIRE SERVICES OR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES./

TORONTO and LOS ANGELES, Oct. 29, 2020 /CNW/ – QYOU Media Inc. (TSXV: QYOU) (OTCQB: QYOUF) (“QYOU Media” or the “Company”) announces that G. Scott Paterson, Board Chair of QYOU Media, exercised 2 million warrants at 6 cents per share bringing his total direct and indirect holdings of shares and warrants of the Company to 22,891,694 common shares and 4,250,000 warrants.

About QYOU Media

QYOU Media operates in India and the United States producing and distributing content created by social media stars and digital content creators. In India, we curate, produce and distribute premium content including television networks and VOD for cable and satellite television, OTT and mobile platforms. In the United States, we manage influencer marketing campaigns for major film studios and brands. Founded and created by industry veterans from Lionsgate, MTV, Disney and Sony, QYOU Media’s millennial and Gen Z-focused content reaches more than 650 million consumers around the world.  Experience our work at www.qyoumedia.com and www.theqindia.com

Join our shareholder chat group on Telegram:  t.me/QYOUMedia

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

SOURCE QYOU Media Inc.

Source:- Canada NewsWire

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Media Beat: October 29, 2020

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Class-action suit filed against Facebook over misappropriation of personal info

Two Facebook users are seeking damages on behalf of hundreds of thousands of Canadians whose personal data may have been improperly used for political purposes.

The proposed class-action lawsuit filed by Calgary residents Saul Benary and Karma Holoboff asks the Federal Court to order the social-media giant to bolster its security practices to better protect sensitive information and comply with federal privacy law. – Jim Bronskill, The Canadian Press

Facebook, Google, Twitter CEOs clash with Congress in a pre-election showdown

A congressional hearing Wednesday left Facebook, Google and Twitter facing conflicting pressures — from Democrats who say they should patrol their sites and services more aggressively and Republicans who felt the companies should have a more hands-off role with most political speech. The mixed signals threatened to add new complications to the tech giants’ already controversial work to protect the world’s most popular digital communications channels from abuse. And it evoked the lingering, widespread unease in Washington with the political and economic leverage the three companies have amassed and the ways they seek to wield it. – Tony Romm, Rachel Lerman, Cat Zakrzewski, Heather Kelly & Elizabeth Dwoskin, The Washington Post

Big Tech’s election plans have a blind spot: Influencers

Platforms like Facebook and Google are sharing their plans to pause political ads around Election Day. That’s won’t stop all paid campaigning. – Arielle Pardes, Wired

Spotify defends Alex Jones’ appearance on Joe Rogan podcast

Spotify’s content policy is in the spotlight amid controversy over Joe Rogan’s hosting of Alex Jones on his podcast, even though Spotify has banned Jones’ own show from its platform. BuzzFeed reported that Spotify won’t tell podcast hosts whom they can have on their shows. – The Information

Tencent Music renews Merlin licensing agreement

Tencent Music Entertainment Group, the leading online music entertainment platform in China, and Merlin, the global digital rights agency for the world’s independent labels, have expanded the terms of their multi-year licensing and cooperation agreement.

Merlin members account for more than 15% of the global digital music market and has deals with over 30 digital partners. – Jem Aswad, Variety

Watch “We told Americans that Canadians all vote the same way

[embedded content]

Source: – FYI Music News

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