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Trump administration to limit number of employees at Chinese media outlets in U.S. – National Post

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WASHINGTON — The United States is slashing the number of Chinese employees permitted to work at the U.S. offices of major Chinese state-owned media outlets to retaliate against Beijing over its “long-standing intimidation and harassment of journalists,” senior State Department officials said on Monday.

China last month revoked the visas of three Wall Street Journal reporters in Beijing after the newspaper declined to apologize for a column with a headline calling China the “real sick man of Asia.” Another reporter with the paper had to leave last year after China declined to renew his visa. One of the State Department officials said the U.S. decision was not particularly linked to the Wall Street Journal case.

“For years, the (Chinese) government has imposed increasingly harsh surveillance, harassment and intimidation against American and other foreign journalists in China,” a senior State Department official told reporters in a briefing.

“There’s a long standing issue here. We’ve been imploring the Chinese for years and years now to improve their treatment of journalists in China. So, this is not linked to any one particular incident,” he said, but added that the expulsion of Journal reporters was a “fairly egregious” example.

Effective March 13, Washington will be capping the number of U.S. based employees of Xinhua News Agency, China Global Television Network, China Radio International, China Daily Distribution Corp to a total of 100, from 160.

The four were among the five outlets designated by the United States as foreign embassies earlier this month, officials said, as a first step of this move.

Both officials spoke to reporters on condition of anonymity.

Tensions between the two superpowers have escalated since President Donald Trump came to office three years ago, with disputes over issues ranging from trade to accusations of Chinese spying in the United States and to U.S. support for Taiwan.

On Monday, the Foreign Correspondents Club of China said in a report that the Chinese government has “weaponised” visas as part of a stepped-up campaign of pressure on foreign journalists.

While the U.S. goal was to get China to be more open with foreign journalists, Washington was ready to take further action if Beijing were to retaliate.

“If in fact they decide to take this in a further negative direction however of course..all options would be on the table. I can’t tell you what in particular we would do, but we’d sit down review the circumstances and then consider all of our options,” the official said.

The personnel caps would be placed on the entities as opposed to people hence it would be up to the media outlets to decide the necessary staffing cuts, the officials said.

While the United States will not be sending anyone back, the officials acknowledged that the Chinese individuals whose visas are contingent on their ability to work in the United States may be forced to leave the country. (Reporting by Humeyra Pamuk Additional reporting by Steve Holland Editing by Alistair Bell)

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Iqaluit woman's daily social media videos offer Inuit-specific 'reasons to stay alive' – CBC.ca

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A young woman from Iqaluit is using social media to advocate for more mental health resources in her community by spreading messages of hope.

Annie Buscemi, 23, an apprentice electrician who has been off work since getting injured in September, started an Instagram and a TikTok account in early October to cope with not being able to work.

Every day on her accounts — ullaakkut (which means good morning in Inuktitut) on Instagram and annieneevee on TikTok — Buscemi posts a video in which she gives one Inuit-specific reason to stay alive.

“I wanted to find a way to keep my mental health healthy and keep my days positive. And when I started this thing, I found a really big difference in my own daily life as well,” she said.

Buscemi said in the last five or six years, she tried several times to talk to a counsellor about her own mental health and has only been able to do so on a couple of occasions.

“Unfortunately, I had to speak to one of them in a hospital, [in] an emergency situation,” she said.

“I’ve had some pretty bad experiences with my own mental health and I found that the mental health resources in Iqaluit aren’t helping me.”

As long as I keep going for myself, I can keep going for other people. – Annie Buscemi

Buscemi said she wants to see more mental health counsellors in Iqaluit and more Inuit-specific youth programs to help young Inuit connect more with their culture.

In the meantime, she decided to take “little steps” like the daily videos she posts, she said.

Impact ‘makes me want to keep going’

Buscemi said she receives messages daily on her Instagram account, which already has more than 600 followers, and her TikTok account that has more than 6,800 followers. People from across Canada and the U.S. thank her for doing the videos.

“Some people have shared their own experiences and how my videos have helped them in their daily lives so I feel like I’m making a pretty big impact and it’s having a big impact on me, too.” she said.

Her latest fan, she said, is her grandmother, to whom she showed her account earlier this week when they had dinner together.

Buscemi said her grandmother spent close to two hours on her couch looking at her videos.

“She was sitting there laughing and sometimes she had tears in her eyes … It makes me want to keep going, like even more,” she said.

Dealing with the pressure

Buscemi started getting recognized in Iqaluit, a city of about 7,700 people, where she said people she doesn’t know have thanked her for posting the videos.

While she appreciates that people like her videos, she also said the recognition and attention leads to pressure.

There are some days, she said, she deals with it by turning off her phone for a couple of hours.

“[It’s to] ground myself … remind myself that I’m doing this for me. 

“I don’t want to start thinking that I’m doing this for other people [although] in a way, I am … I have to keep going for myself. As long as I keep going for myself, I can keep going for other people,” she said.

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Former James Bond actor Sean Connery dies aged 90 – British media – National Post

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Article content continued

But Connery’s influence helped shape the character in the books as well as the films. He never attempted to disguise his Scottish accent, leading Fleming to give Bond Scottish heritage in the books that were released after Connery’s debut.

Born Thomas Connery on Aug. 25, 1930, he was the elder of two sons of a long-distance truck driver and a mother who worked as a cleaner. He dropped out of school at age 13 and worked in a variety of menial jobs. At 16, two years after World War Two ended, Connery was drafted into the Royal Navy, and served three years.

““I grew up with no notion of a career, much less acting,” he once said. ““I certainly never have plotted it out. It was all happenstance, really.”

Connery played small parts with theater repertory companies before graduating to films and television.

It was his part in a 1959 Disney leprechaun movie, “Darby O’Gill and the Little People,” that helped land the role of Bond. Broccoli, a producer of the Bond films, asked his wife to watch Connery in the Disney movie while he was searching for the right leading actor.

Dana Broccoli said her husband told her he was not sure Connery had sex appeal.

“I saw that face and the way he moved and talked and I said: ‘Cubby, he’s fabulous!’” she said. “He was just perfect, he had star material right there.”

Connery married actress Diane Cilento in 1962. Before divorcing 11 years later, they had a son, Jason, who became an actor. He married French artist Micheline Roquebrune, whom he met playing golf, in 1975. (Reporting by Andrew MacAskill in London and Will Dunham and Sonya Hepinstall in Washington Editing by Bill Trott, Andrew Heavens and Frances Kerry)

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Former James Bond actor Sean Connery dies aged 90 – British media – National Post

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Article content continued

Born Thomas Connery on Aug. 25, 1930, he was the elder of two sons of a long-distance truck driver and a mother who worked as a cleaner. He dropped out of school at age 13 and worked in a variety of menial jobs. At 16, two years after World War Two ended, Connery was drafted into the Royal Navy, and served three years.

““I grew up with no notion of a career, much less acting,” he once said. ““I certainly never have plotted it out. It was all happenstance, really.”

Connery played small parts with theater repertory companies before graduating to films and television.

It was his part in a 1959 Disney leprechaun movie, “Darby O’Gill and the Little People,” that helped land the role of Bond. Broccoli, a producer of the Bond films, asked his wife to watch Connery in the Disney movie while he was searching for the right leading actor.

Dana Broccoli said her husband told her he was not sure Connery had sex appeal.

“I saw that face and the way he moved and talked and I said: ‘Cubby, he’s fabulous!’” she said. “He was just perfect, he had star material right there.”

Connery married actress Diane Cilento in 1962. Before divorcing 11 years later, they had a son, Jason, who became an actor. He married French artist Micheline Roquebrune, whom he met playing golf, in 1975. (Reporting by Andrew MacAskill in London and Will Dunham and Sonya Hepinstall in Washington Additional reporting by Alistair Smout in London Editing by Bill Trott, Andrew Heavens and Frances Kerry Reporting by Andrew MacAskill; editing by John Stonestreet)

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