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Twenty More COVID-19 Cases In NB Reported On Sunday – country94.ca

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Another day with COVID-19 cases in the double digits.

Public Health reported 20 new cases of COVID-19 for Sunday.

Ten cases in Zone 1 (Moncton region) are as follows:

  • four people 19 and under;
  • an individual 20-29;
  • an individual 30-39;
  • an individual 50-59;
  • two people 60-69; and
  • an individual 70-79.

The nine cases in Zone 4 (Edmundston region) are:

  • two people 19 and under;
  • an individual 20-29;
  • an individual 40-49;
  • three people 50-59;
  • an individual 60-69: and
  • an individual 80-89.

The one case in Zone 7 (Miramichi region) is as follows:

  • an individual 50-59.

All of the individuals are self isolating and the cases are under investigation.

“We are seeing encouraging trends, but the reliability of this information depends on those who have symptoms getting tested immediately, said Dr. Jennifer Russell, chief medical officer of health. “We will be more confident in our decision making – and zone restrictions are more likely to be eased – if more New Brunswickers, in all health zones, who have symptoms get tested.”

The total number of active COVID-19 cases currently is 334, with 14 more recovered cases reported since Saturday. Five patients are hospitalized with two in intensive care.

Below is a breakdown of the number of cases considered active in each zone:

  • Zone 1 (Moncton health region): 90
  • Zone 2 (Saint John health region): 36
  • Zone 3 (Fredericton health region): 36
  • Zone 4 (Edmundston health region): 144
  • Zone 5 (Campbellton health region): 19
  • Zone 6 (Bathurst health region): 7
  • Zone 7 (Miramichi health region): 2

Since cases began being reported in the province, New Brunswick has had 1,124 and 776 people have recovered. Thirteen people have died.

Zone 4 went into lockdown over the weekend. Zones 1, 2 and 3 remain at the red level, and zones 5, 6 and 7 are at the orange level.

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What caused Alta.'s fireball Monday? U of A scientists solve 'incredible mystery' – CTV News Edmonton

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EDMONTON —
We’re learning more about the fireball so many Albertans saw streak across the dark sky early Monday morning.

Thanks to the University of Alberta’s fireball monitoring network, scientists are now able to say that bright streak was a small piece of a comet that burned up in Earth’s atmosphere.

According to the U of A’s Faculty of Science, Western Canada’s most advanced fireball monitoring network also helped in determining the trajectory and velocity of the meteor, as well as its origin.

“This chunk was largely made of dust and ice, burning up immediately without leaving anything to find on the ground, but instead giving us a spectacular flash,” Patrick Hill, from U of A’s Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, said in a news release.

That flash was seen throughout Alberta and parts of Saskatchewan at 6:23 a.m. Monday, due to the unusually high altitude of the fireball.

Normally a rocky object will burn up between 15 to 20 kilometres above the ground after entering the atmosphere, but U of A scientists say Monday’s fireball happened at an altitude of 46 kilometres.

That’s how so many people, and cameras, were able to see the natural light show.  

“All meteoroids – objects that become meteors once they enter Earth’s atmosphere – enter at the same altitude and then start to burn up with friction,” explained Hill. “Sturdier, rocky meteoroids can sometimes survive to make it to the ground, but because this was going so fast and was made of weaker material, it flashed out much higher in the atmosphere and was visible from much farther away.”

U of A scientists believe the final point on its trajectory was 120 kilometres north of Edmonton.

They say the small piece of comet debris, likely only tens of centimeters across in size, travelled at a rate of more than 220,000 kilometres an hour before entering Earth’s atmosphere.

“This incredible speed and the orbit of the fireball tell us that the object came at us from way out at the edge of the solar system, telling us it was a comet, rather than a relatively slower rock coming from the asteroid belt,” Chris Herd, curator of the UAlberta Meteorite Collection and professor in the Faculty of Science, said in a news release.

“Comets are made up of dust and ice and are weaker than rocky objects, and hitting our atmosphere would have been like hitting a brick wall for something travelling at this speed,” Herd added.

The team from the U of A used dark-sky images from the Hesje Observatory at the Augustana Miquelon Lake Research Station and at Lakeland College’s observation station in Vermilion to make their calculations.

Unlike the Buzzard Coulee meteorite from November 2008, which produced a similar fireball effect, there most likely won’t be anything remaining to find on the ground. 

Still, Herd and Hill are pleased with their learnings.

“This is an incredible mystery to have solved,” said Herd. “We’re thrilled that we caught it on two of our cameras, which could give everyone who saw this amazing fireball a solution.”

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What caused Alta.'s fireball Monday? U of A scientists solve 'incredible mystery' – CTV Edmonton

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EDMONTON —
We’re learning more about the fireball so many Albertans saw streak across the dark sky early Monday morning.

Thanks to the University of Alberta’s fireball monitoring network, scientists are now able to say that bright streak was a small piece of a comet that burned up in Earth’s atmosphere.

According to the U of A’s Faculty of Science, Western Canada’s most advanced fireball monitoring network also helped in determining the trajectory and velocity of the meteor, as well as its origin.

“This chunk was largely made of dust and ice, burning up immediately without leaving anything to find on the ground, but instead giving us a spectacular flash,” Patrick Hill, from U of A’s Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, said in a news release.

That flash was seen throughout Alberta and parts of Saskatchewan at 6:23 a.m. Monday, due to the unusually high altitude of the fireball.

Normally a rocky object will burn up between 15 to 20 kilometres above the ground after entering the atmosphere, but U of A scientists say Monday’s fireball happened at an altitude of 46 kilometres.

That’s how so many people, and cameras, were able to see the natural light show.  

“All meteoroids – objects that become meteors once they enter Earth’s atmosphere – enter at the same altitude and then start to burn up with friction,” explained Hill. “Sturdier, rocky meteoroids can sometimes survive to make it to the ground, but because this was going so fast and was made of weaker material, it flashed out much higher in the atmosphere and was visible from much farther away.”

U of A scientists believe the final point on its trajectory was 120 kilometres north of Edmonton.

They say the small piece of comet debris, likely only tens of centimteres across in size, travelled at a rate of more than 220,000 kilometres an hour before entering Earth’s atmosphere.

“This incredible speed and the orbit of the fireball tell us that the object came at us from way out at the edge of the solar system, telling us it was a comet, rather than a relatively slower rock coming from the asteroid belt,” Chris Herd, curator of the UAlberta Meteorite Collection and professor in the Faculty of Science, said in a news release.

“Comets are made up of dust and ice and are weaker than rocky objects, and hitting our atmosphere would have been like hitting a brick wall for something travelling at this speed,” Herd added.

The team from the U of A used dark-sky images from the Hesje Observatory at the Augustana Miquelon Lake Research Station and at Lakeland College’s observation station in Vermilion to make their calculations.

Unlike the Buzzard Coulee meteorite from November 2008, which produced a similar fireball effect, there most likely won’t be anything remaining to find on the ground. 

Still, Herd and Hill are pleased with their learnings.

“This is an incredible mystery to have solved,” said Herd. “We’re thrilled that we caught it on two of our cameras, which could give everyone who saw this amazing fireball a solution.”

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Take a look around Mars with Perseverance rover's HD photo panorama – Global News

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NASA‘s Perseverance rover is offering Earthlings the next-best thing to standing on Mars with a series of high-definition panorama photos that allow you to look around the Red Planet at your leisure.

The space agency released the panorama footage on Wednesday, a few days after it successfully landed its Perseverance rover in the Jezero Crater on Mars.

“The newly released panorama reveals the crater rim and cliff face of an ancient river delta in the distance,” NASA said in a news release.

Read more:
NASA’s Perseverance rover sends back ‘stunning’ images after landing on Mars

It also reveals the scene around the rover in extremely high detail, so that you can actually see the rivets on the vehicle and the pores in individual Martian rocks.

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The interactive footage is a bit like Google Maps on Mars. You can swipe, drag or zoom the camera to take a look at the full 360-degree field of view around Perseverance, thanks to 142 high-definition photos that have been stitched together.

Click on the image below to explore the panorama footage from Mars.

Perseverance captured the photos with its Mastcam-Z camera over the weekend. The high-definition camera can pick out details as small as 3 to 5 millimetres at close range, and between 2 to 3 metres across on the mountainous horizon, according to NASA.






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Richmond company goes to Mars


Richmond company goes to Mars

NASA says the view from Perseverance is similar to what it has seen at past landing sites.

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“We’re nestled right in a sweet spot, where you can see different features similar in many ways to features found by Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity at their landing sites,” said Jim Bell, NASA’s principal investigator for the camera, in the news release.

NASA researchers have already started picking out interesting sights from the Martian surface, including a rock formation that appears to have been carved by the merciless Martian wind.


This wind-carved rock seen in first 360-degree panorama taken by the Mastcam-Z instrument shows just how much detail is captured by the camera systems.


NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/ASU

The rover’s primary mission is to search for signs of ancient life on Mars, and to eventually send samples of the Martian surface back to Earth for analysis.

One of the first steps in that mission is to scan the crater’s surface for rocks that are worthy of closer inspection.

The crater was once a lake filled with liquid water, but that water disappeared about three billion years ago.

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Click to play video 'Significance of NASA’s historic landing on Mars'



4:52
Significance of NASA’s historic landing on Mars


Significance of NASA’s historic landing on Mars

Scientists hope that some forms of microbial life might have lived in that ancient sea, and that their microscopic remains can be found in the rock and soil on the surface today.

The rover will eventually collect several samples, package them up and leave them at designated retrieval points, where a future mission will one day retrieve them and fly them back to Earth.

Read more:
Scientists ‘shocked’ to find life in extreme depths under Antarctic ice

NASA will also scan the photos for a flat spot where it can launch the rover’s miniature helicopter.

All those efforts start with reviewing the same panorama photos that NASA has now released to the public.

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That means you can join scientists in scanning the photos for interesting details on the distant Martian surface.

You probably won’t spot any fossilized aliens laying around — but who says you can’t at least try?

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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