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COVID-19 in Ottawa: Child under 10 hospitalized – CTV Edmonton

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OTTAWA —
A child under 10 has been hospitalized with COVID-19 in Ottawa as active cases of the virus continue to increase.

The child is one of 11 people in hospital with the virus in Ottawa hospitals. One person in their 80s is in the ICU.

Ottawa Public Health reported 26 new COVID-19 cases on Monday, a day after officials confirmed the Omicron variant arrived in the capital.

The 26 cases are a decrease from the 61 on Sunday and 45 on Saturday reported by Ottawa Public Health. Sunday’s case count was the city’s highest since May.

The child in hospital is the 11th person under 10 years old to be hospitalized with COVID-19 in Ottawa during the pandemic.

Ottawa Public Health also provided the latest vaccine numbers for children between the ages of five and 11, who started receiving their shots last week. The health unit says nearly 8,500 children received their first doses from Friday to Sunday.

Active cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa sit at 347, two more than on Sunday.

Provincewide, Ontario health officials reported 788 new cases and three new deaths from the virus on Monday.

The province’s rolling seven-day average is now 783, up from 656 at this time last week.

OTTAWA’S KEY COVID-19 STATISTICS

  • COVID-19 cases per 100,000 (Nov. 21 to Nov. 27): 27.0 (down from 27..8)          
  • Positivity rate in Ottawa (Nov. 19 to Nov. 25): 1.7 per cent
  • Reproduction number (Seven day average): 1.13

Reproduction values greater than 1 indicate the virus is spreading and each case infects more than one contact. If it is less than 1, it means spread is slowing.

UNVACCINATED CASES

People who are not fully vaccinated represent 439 of Ontario’s 788 new cases on Monday. An additional 34 had an unknown vaccination status.

COVID-19 VACCINES IN OTTAWA

Ottawa Public Health has updated its vaccination numbers to include children between ages five and 11, who are now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine.

The healh unit releases vaccine numbers on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

As of Monday:

  • Ottawa residents with 1 dose (5+): 848,906 (+9.031)
  • Ottawa residents with 2 doses (5+): 813,273 (+859)
  • Share of population 12 and older with at least one dose: 92 per cent
  • Share of population 12 and older fully vaccinated: 88 per cent
  • Share or population five and older with at least one dose: 85 per cent
  • Share of population five and older fully vaccinated: 81 per cent

*Statistics on Ottawa residents with one or two doses include anyone with an Ottawa postal code who was vaccinated anywhere in Ontario.

ACTIVE CASES OF COVID-19 IN OTTAWA

There are 347 active cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa on Monday, up from 345 active cases on Sunday.

Ottawa Public Health reported 24 more newly resolved cases of COVID-19. The total number of resolved cases of coronavirus in Ottawa is 30,104.

The number of active cases is the number of total laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 minus the numbers of resolved cases and deaths. A case is considered resolved 14 days after known symptom onset or positive test result.

HOSPITALIZATIONS IN OTTAWA

There are 11 people in Ottawa area hospitals with COVID-19 related illnesses on Monday, one more than on Sunday.

There is one patient in the ICU. That person is in their 80s.

Age categories of people in hospital:

  • 0-9: 1
  • 10-19: 0
  • 20-29: 0
  • 30-39: 0
  • 40-49: 1
  • 50-59: 0
  • 60-69: 3
  • 70-79: 1
  • 80-89: 4 (1 in ICU)
  • 90+: 1

(Ottawa Public Health is now reporting people in hospital with an “active” infection)

COVID-19 CASES IN OTTAWA BY AGE CATEGORY

  • 0-9 years old: Seven new cases (3,112 total cases)
  • 10-19 years-old: Six new cases (4,274 total cases)
  • 20-29 years-old: Two new cases (7,066 total cases)
  • 30-39 years-old: One new case (4,890 total cases)
  • 40-49 years-old: Seven new cases (4,185 total cases)
  • 50-59 years-old: Two new cases (3,642 total cases)
  • 60-69-years-old: Zero new cases (2,155 total cases)
  • 70-79 years-old: One new case (1,188 total cases)
  • 80-89 years-old: Zero new cases (904 total cases)
  • 90+ years old: Zero new cases (550 total cases)
  • Unknown: Zero new cases (3 cases total)

VARIANTS OF CONCERN

The Omicron variant has not yet been added to Ottawa Public Health’s list of variants of concern.

  • Total Alpha (B.1.1.7) cases: 6,850
  • Total Beta (B.1.351) cases: 513
  • Total Gamma (P.1) cases: 55
  • Total Delta (B.1.617.2) cases: 1,142
  • Total variants of concern/mutation cases: 12,233
  • Deaths linked to variants/mutations: 121

*OPH notes that that VOC and mutation trends must be treated with caution due to the varying time required to complete VOC testing and/or genomic analysis following the initial positive test for SARS-CoV-2. Test results may be completed in batches and data corrections or updates can result in changes to case counts that may differ from past reports.

CASES OF COVID-19 AROUND THE REGION

  • Eastern Ontario Health Unit: 10 new cases
  • Hastings Prince Edward Public Health: 11 new cases
  • Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox & Addington Public Health: 47 new cases
  • Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit: Two new cases
  • Renfrew County and District Health Unit: Five new cases

COVID-19 OUTBREAKS

Ottawa Public Health reports COVID-19 outbreaks at institutions and community outbreaks in Ottawa. There are eight ongoing outbreaks in health care institutions and 20 in child care and school settings.

Community outbreaks:

  • Workplace – Manufacturing: One outbreak
  • Workplace – Recreation: One outbreak

Schools and childcare spaces currently experiencing outbreaks: 

  1. École élémentaire publique Marie-Curie (Nov. 5) 
  2. Holy Family Elementary School (Nov. 7)
  3. Assumption Catholic elementary school (Nov. 8)
  4. Académie Providence Soeurs Antonines (Nov. 16)
  5. Carlington Recreation Centre – Licenced Childcare Centre (Nov. 17)
  6. Wee Watch – Licenced home childcare – Kanata (Nov. 18)
  7. Fern Hill School (Nov. 19)
  8. Chesterton Academy (Nov. 21)
  9. St. Rita Elementary School (Nov. 21)
  10. École élémentaire catholique d’enseignment personnalisé Lamoureux (Nov. 21)
  11. Pinecrest Public School (Nov. 21)
  12. Carson Grove Elementary School (Nov. 22)
  13. Holy Redeemer Elementary School (Nov. 22)
  14. Chapel Hill Catholic School (Nov. 23)
  15. École élémentaire catholique St. François d’Assise (Nov. 24)
  16. Inuuqutigiit licenced childcare – Overbrook (Nov. 25)
  17. Notre Dame High School (Nov. 25)
  18. Maryvale Academy of Ottawa (Nov. 26)
  19. Frank Ryan Catholic Intermediate School (Nov. 26)

Healthcare and congregate settings experiencing outbreaks:

  1. The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus – A4/A5/B5/AMA/Medicine units (Oct. 28)
  2. The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus – A3 Unit (Oct. 29)
  3. Portobello Retirement Residence (Nov. 3)
  4. The Ottawa Hospital General Campus – 6 West (Nov. 10)
  5. Rooming House (Nov. 12)
  6. Chapel Hill Retirement Residence – 3rd floor (Nov. 13)
  7. St. Patrick’s Home – Floors 3, 4, 5 (Nov. 17)
  8. The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus – Unit B2 (Nov. 19)

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Amazon's Alabama Workers Are Getting a Second Chance to Unionize – Gizmodo

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Image for article titled Amazon's Alabama Workers Are Getting a Second Chance to Unionize
Photo: Jay Reeves (AP)

Bessemer, Alabama warehouse workers will get a second shot at a union election, the National Labor Relations Board has decided. It found that Amazon shot itself in the foot by interfering with the election, even beyond its considerable leverage to influence workers.

This spring, after Amazon warehouse workers voted 1,798 to 738 against unionizing under the Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union (RWDSU), the RWDSU filed 23 objections alleging that Amazon improperly interfered in the election. In August, an NLRB hearing officer agreed that Amazon had violated labor law, mainly due to the infamous mailbox, ostensibly to facilitate mail-in voting. NLRB Regional Director Lisa Henderson upheld that ruling today.

Given its sizable advantages—vast resources and workers’ non-stop, undivided attention—Amazon’s epic fumble is pretty mind-blowing. The NLRB specifically told Amazon not to install things like “pass-through boxes” that obviously belonged to the employer. And yet, Amazon then delegated the USPS to install a mailbox in the parking lot, in view of security cameras, and placed a suggestive tent around it and hung a banner reading “SPEAK FOR YOURSELF! MAIL YOUR BALLOT HERE.” Emails later revealed that Amazon directed the USPS to modify the box to its liking.

The RWDSU had objected that the tent and box looked an awful lot like an employer-run polling location, giving the impression that Amazon could control the election outcome and track voters’ identities, and that the in-tent messaging qualified as electioneering. The NLRB agreed.

The union also alleged that Amazon threatened to lay off 75 percent of its workforce and shut down its warehouses if workers unionized. An Amazon spokesperson denied this in an email to Gizmodo in April, and the union withdrew that objection. But that hypothetical threat could help explain the dramatic shift in support from the union’s initial claim that 3,000 workers—more than half of the 5,800 working at Bessemer—initially signed cards in favor of holding an election.

Amazon also brought in pricey union-busting consultants, ran captive audience meetings, and reportedly photographed workers’ badges if they spoke up. Workers received a barrage of texts, emails, and mailers with anti-union messaging. They spent their days in overheated warehouses surrounded by flyers insinuating that they’d lose pay if they unionized and, if they watched Twitch, possibly saw the ads featuring fellow workers. All of that’s legal.

In a statement shared with Gizmodo, Amazon spokesperson Kelly Nantel said that “[i]t’s disappointing that the NLRB has now decided that those votes shouldn’t count.” Nantel generally reiterated Amazon’s anti-union position but did not address the NLRB’s specific finding that the company denied workers a fair election.

The election date has yet to be announced. Read the entire ruling, with responses to Amazon’s excuses, here:

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Amazon's Alabama Workers Are Getting a Second Chance to Unionize – Gizmodo

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Image for article titled Amazon's Alabama Workers Are Getting a Second Chance to Unionize
Photo: Jay Reeves (AP)

Bessemer, Alabama warehouse workers will get a second shot at a union election, the National Labor Relations Board has decided. It found that Amazon shot itself in the foot by interfering with the election, even beyond its considerable leverage to influence workers.

This spring, after Amazon warehouse workers voted 1,798 to 738 against unionizing under the Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union (RWDSU), the RWDSU filed 23 objections alleging that Amazon improperly interfered in the election. In August, an NLRB hearing officer agreed that Amazon had violated labor law, mainly due to the infamous mailbox, ostensibly to facilitate mail-in voting. NLRB Regional Director Lisa Henderson upheld that ruling today.

Given its sizable advantages—vast resources and workers’ non-stop, undivided attention—Amazon’s epic fumble is pretty mind-blowing. The NLRB specifically told Amazon not to install things like “pass-through boxes” that obviously belonged to the employer. And yet, Amazon then delegated the USPS to install a mailbox in the parking lot, in view of security cameras, and placed a suggestive tent around it and hung a banner reading “SPEAK FOR YOURSELF! MAIL YOUR BALLOT HERE.” Emails later revealed that Amazon directed the USPS to modify the box to its liking.

The RWDSU had objected that the tent and box looked an awful lot like an employer-run polling location, giving the impression that Amazon could control the election outcome and track voters’ identities, and that the in-tent messaging qualified as electioneering. The NLRB agreed.

The union also alleged that Amazon threatened to lay off 75 percent of its workforce and shut down its warehouses if workers unionized. An Amazon spokesperson denied this in an email to Gizmodo in April, and the union withdrew that objection. But that hypothetical threat could help explain the dramatic shift in support from the union’s initial claim that 3,000 workers—more than half of the 5,800 working at Bessemer—initially signed cards in favor of holding an election.

Amazon also brought in pricey union-busting consultants, ran captive audience meetings, and reportedly photographed workers’ badges if they spoke up. Workers received a barrage of texts, emails, and mailers with anti-union messaging. They spent their days in overheated warehouses surrounded by flyers insinuating that they’d lose pay if they unionized and, if they watched Twitch, possibly saw the ads featuring fellow workers. All of that’s legal.

In a statement shared with Gizmodo, Amazon spokesperson Kelly Nantel said that “[i]t’s disappointing that the NLRB has now decided that those votes shouldn’t count.” Nantel generally reiterated Amazon’s anti-union position but did not address the NLRB’s specific finding that the company denied workers a fair election.

The election date has yet to be announced. Read the entire ruling, with responses to Amazon’s excuses, here:

[embedded content]

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