Connect with us

Tech

U.S. lawmakers express concern over reports of potential Turkey F-16 purchase

Published

 on

Democratic and Republican U.S. lawmakers urged President Joe Biden’s administration not to sell F-16 fighter jets to Turkey and said they were confident Congress would block any such exports.

In a letter to Biden and U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, 11 members of the House of Representatives cited “a profound sense of concern” about recent reports that Turkey may purchase 40 new Lockheed Martin F-16s and 80 F-16 modernization kits.

The letter was dated Oct. 25 and reviewed by Reuters on Tuesday.

“Following President (Tayyip) Erdogan’s September announcement that Turkey will purchase an additional tranche of Russian S-400 missile defense systems, we cannot afford to compromise our national security by sending U.S.-manufactured aircraft to a treaty ally which continues to behave like an adversary,” the lawmakers wrote.

The White House and State Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Reuters reported earlier this month https://www.reuters.com/world/middle-east/turkey-seeks-40-f-16-jets-upgrade-air-force-sources-2021-10-07 that Turkey had made a request to the United States to buy 40 Lockheed Martin-made F-16 fighter jets and nearly 80 modernization kits for its existing warplanes.

Ankara had also previously ordered more than 100 Lockheed Martin F-35s, but the United States removed Turkey from the program in 2019 after it acquired the Russian S-400s.

The letter was led by Republican Representative Nicole Malliotakis and Democratic Representative Carolyn Maloney.

“While we are confident that Congress will stand together to block any such exports should these plans progress, the United States cannot afford to transfer any advanced military equipment to the government of Turkey at this time,” the letter said.

The partnership between the NATO allies has gone through tumult in the past five years over disagreements on Syria, Ankara’s closer ties with Moscow, its naval ambitions in the Mediterranean, U.S. charges against a state-owned Turkish bank and erosion of rights and freedoms in Turkey.

 

(Reporting by Patricia Zengerle; Editing by Karishma Singh)

Tech

Twitter is testing a new way to let you add content warnings to posts – The Verge

Published

 on


Twitter is piloting a new feature that will let users add specific content warnings to individual photos and videos sent out in tweets. The platform noted that the feature would be available to “some” users during the test.

Although Twitter currently has a way to add content warnings to tweets, the only way to do it is to add the warning to all your tweets. In other words, every photo or video you post will have a content warning, regardless of whether it contains sensitive material or not. The new feature it’s testing lets you add the warning to single tweets and apply specific categories to that warning.

As shown in the video that Twitter posted, it appears that when you’re editing an image or video, tapping the flag icon on the bottom right corner of the toolbar lets you add a content warning. The next screen lets you categorize the warning, with choices including “nudity,” “violence,” or “sensitive.” Once you post the tweet, the image or video will appear blurred out, and it’s overlaid with a content warning that explains why you flagged it. Users can click through the warning if they want to view the content.

If you fail to flag content when you post sensitive material, Twitter will — as it has already been doing — rely on user reports to decide whether or not your content should have a warning. In addition to its content warning experiment, Twitter announced yesterday that it’s trying out a “human-first” way to handle the reporting process. Instead of asking the user what rules the tweet is breaking, it will give the user the chance to describe what exactly happened, and based on that response, it will determine a specific violation.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Tech

iOS 15.2 will help you spot third-party iPhone parts – Yahoo Canada Finance

Published

 on


Apple’s seeming about-face on repairability will soon help you spot less-than-honest iPhone repair shops and part sellers. As Gizmodo notes, Apple has revealed iOS 15.2’s settings will include a “parts and service history” section (under General > About) that indicates not only whether the battery, camera and display have been replaced, but will indicate whether or not they’re officially sanctioned Apple parts. If a component is listed as an “unknown part,” it’s either unofficial, an already-used part from another iPhone or malfunctioning.

Just how much you’ll learn depends on your iPhone model. Anyone using an iPhone XR, XS or second-generation iPhone SE can only tell if the battery has been replaced. You’ll need an iPhone 11 or newer to also find out if there’s a display swap, and an iPhone 12 or later to know if the camera has been replaced. Apple stressed that these alerts won’t prevent you from using your device — you’re fine if you’re comfortable using unofficial parts and losing warranty coverage.

iOS 15.2 currently exists as a release candidate for developers, suggesting the finished version will be available relatively soon. It’s not yet clear if iPad owners will see a corresponding part history feature at some point.

The “unknown part” label might not thrill advocates for third-party component options. Apple clearly wants you to use official parts, and that means either taking it in for authorized service or (in 2022) buying parts from Apple. This might help you catch shops lying about the quality of their parts, though, and could be useful if you repair an iPhone yourself and want to be sure your fixes went smoothly.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Tech

iOS 15.2 will help you spot third-party iPhone parts – Engadget

Published

 on


Apple’s seeming about-face on repairability will soon help you spot less-than-honest iPhone repair shops and part sellers. As Gizmodo notes, Apple has revealed iOS 15.2’s settings will include a “parts and service history” section (under General > About) that indicates not only whether the battery, camera and display have been replaced, but will indicate whether or not they’re officially sanctioned Apple parts. If a component is listed as an “unknown part,” it’s either unofficial, an already-used part from another iPhone or malfunctioning.

Just how much you’ll learn depends on your iPhone model. Anyone using an iPhone XR, XS or second-generation iPhone SE can only tell if the battery has been replaced. You’ll need an iPhone 11 or newer to also find out if there’s a display swap, and an iPhone 12 or later to know if the camera has been replaced. Apple stressed that these alerts won’t prevent you from using your device — you’re fine if you’re comfortable using unofficial parts and losing warranty coverage.

iOS 15.2 currently exists as a release candidate for developers, suggesting the finished version will be available relatively soon. It’s not yet clear if iPad owners will see a corresponding part history feature at some point.

The “unknown part” label might not thrill advocates for third-party component options. Apple clearly wants you to use official parts, and that means either taking it in for authorized service or (in 2022) buying parts from Apple. This might help you catch shops lying about the quality of their parts, though, and could be useful if you repair an iPhone yourself and want to be sure your fixes went smoothly.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending