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UPDATE: COVID-19 VOC Exposure: Oliver's Steakhouse, Oakville – Oakville News

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Further to our investigation, Halton Region Public Health has confirmed two additional cases of COVID-19, bringing the total number of staff infected to seven. As a result, Halton Region Public Health is extending the exposure period to up to and including Thursday, March 18.

Halton Region Public Health  asks all patrons who dined at Oliver’s Steakhouse between March 8 and March 18 to self-isolate for 14 days after their visit, and to get tested for COVID-19.

All seven confirmed cases are of a variant of concern. While Halton Region Public Health’s investigation and case and contact management is ongoing, it is estimated that the total number of people exposed during this time is more than 200.

March 19, 2021: Halton Region Public Health has declared an outbreak of COVID-19 at Oliver’s Steakhouse Restaurant located at 141 Lakeshore Rd E, Oakville. Patrons who dined at the restaurant between March 8 and March 13 have been exposed to a COVID-19 variant of concern.

While Public Health is attempting to call these patrons, this effort may take some time. In the interest of time, we are asking all such patrons to self-isolate for 14 days after their visit to the restaurant, and to get tested for COVID-19. Patrons can call 311 for more information.

As COVID-19 and COVID-19 variants continue to circulate in the community, Halton Region Public Health is stressing the important role that Halton residents play in supporting contact tracing efforts, following public health direction and reducing virus spread.

For more information on COVID-19, including instructions on how to self-isolate and how to seek testing, please visit our COVID-19 Information and Guidance page via halton.ca/COVID19.

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Meteorite found in B.C. could shed light on solar system's origin says physicist – Vancouver Sun

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Peter G. Brown, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Western Ontario, says the meteorite made its fiery way to Earth on Oct. 3, after spinning out of its orbit in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, nearly 180 million kilometres away.

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LONDON, Ont. — A small, angular rock that one Canadian physicist says looks like a chunk of black cheese has the potential to help scientists understand how the early solar system formed.

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Peter G. Brown, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Western Ontario, says the meteorite made its fiery way to Earth on Oct. 3, after spinning out of its orbit in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, nearly 180 million kilometres away.

It tore through the roof of a home in Golden, B.C., narrowly missing the head a sleeping woman.

Brown says the woman has loaned the rock to the university and, for the next month or so, it will become “a small piece of a larger puzzle” as scientists “disentangle how the early solar system formed.”

He says the 4.5 billion-year-old meteorite is older than anything on Earth but is formed of minerals found here, like iron and nickel, although in much larger proportions, giving it unusual weight for a rock its size.

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The exact chemistry is still being studied, but Brown says the findings will link the rock to specific asteroids spinning beyond Mars, while his goal is to use photos of the Oct. 3 fireball to compute the meteorite’s orbit, then merge the chemical and physical data to track the rock’s origin.

It will eventually be returned to the woman whose roof it punctured, but Brown says it will first have given scientists a peek at how the asteroid belt formed, how asteroids evolved and how all that played a role in the formation of the planets.

A hole from a meteorite that fell through the roof of Ruth Hamilton’s home.
A hole from a meteorite that fell through the roof of Ruth Hamilton’s home. Photo by Ruth Hamilton /THE CANADIAN PRESS

“This piece is sort of a primitive piece of the original material that formed in the early solar system,” Brown says in an interview from his office in London, Ont.

“The sheer quantity of information that’s hidden in the rock that we can tease out, in a lot of ways it’s like a really, really dense messenger of information about the early solar system.”

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The recovery of this meteorite and the associated photos of its fireball over southwestern Canada are fairly rare, Brown says.

It happens only once every five or ten years, but he says the data produced will be combined with similar events elsewhere in the world.

“We are building up a bigger statistical collection of these sorts of samples with spatial context but each one is unique, and it certainly makes the meteorite science a lot more valuable to know what the original orbit was of the object.”

“We learn a lot of new things about the solar system each time we do this,” Brown says.

Initial analysis of the meteorite could take a few weeks to a month, but more detailed examination “could go on for years,” he says.

  1. A meteorite rests on Ruth Hamilton's bed after it crashed through her ceiling while she slept on Oct. 4.

    B.C. woman nearly hit by meteorite that crashed through bedroom ceiling: ‘I’ve never been so scared in my life’

  2. This map shows the area where dozens of small meteors likely landed in and around Golden B.C. on Oct. 3.

    Golden B.C. residents asked to search for dozens of small meteorites in and around their town

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Meteorite Hits Canadian Woman's Home – Snopes.com

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A Canadian woman had an exceedingly unlikely experience when a meteorite smashed through her roof and landed on her bed during a meteor shower on the night of Oct. 3, 2021.

Ruth Hamilton, a resident of Golden, British Columbia, told Canadian news outlet CBC on Oct. 12 that she had been sleeping during the meteor shower, just before midnight, when her dog woke her up by barking. It seems that her dog saved her life.

“The next thing was just a huge explosion and debris all over my face,” Hamilton told CBC.

Hamilton told various news outlets that the rock crashed through her roof and landed on her pillow, where her head normally rests. She was unharmed.

“I just jumped up and turned on the light, I couldn’t figure out what the heck had happened,” she told Victoria News, adding that she then called 911 and with the help of local authorities, determined that the only place the rock could have come from was above.

“I’m just totally amazed over the fact that it is a star that came out of the sky, It’s maybe billions of years old,” Hamilton stated.

Peter Brown, Canada Research Chair at Ontario’s Western University, told The Golden Star newspaper that the chances of a meteorite landing on someone’s home were 100 billion to one.

“Every meteorite is older than the oldest rocks on earth,” Brown told the Sun. “If we can study them, we can learn about how planets in the solar system formed.”

The 2.8-pound rock that crashed into Hamilton’s home was identified as part of the Oct. 3 meteor shower by Alan Hildebrand, a planetary scientist at the University of Calgary.

Scientists are asking area residents to contact them and submit any videos or pieces of meteorites that landed on the ground during the event, which was highly visible in the night sky, per the Vancouver Sun. The Sun reported the path of the event “tracked through central and southern Alberta and southeastern B.C. before making landfall in Golden.”


Sources:

Palmer, Claire. “B.C. Woman Awakes to a Hole in Her Roof and a Space Rock on Her Pillow.” Victoria News, 8 Oct. 2021, https://www.vicnews.com/news/b-c-woman-awakes-to-a-hole-in-her-roof-and-a-space-rock-on-her-pillow/.

Carrigg, David. “Golden B.C. Residents Asked to Search for Dozens of Small Meteorites in and around Their Town.” Vancouver Sun, 13 October 2021, https://vancouversun.com/news/golden-b-c-residents-asked-to-search-for-dozens-of-small-meteorites-in-and-around-their-town.

CBC. “Woman Rocked Awake by Meteorite Chunk Crashing into Her Bedroom | CBC News.” 12 October 2021, https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/meteorite-crashes-into-womans-bedroom-golden-bc-1.6207904.

Palmer, Claire. “Researcher Says Golden’s Meteor on the Pillow Was a 100 Billion to 1 Shot.” The Golden Star, 13 Oct. 2021, https://www.thegoldenstar.net/news/researcher-says-goldens-meteor-on-the-pillow-was-a-100-billion-to-1-shot/.

Neuman, Scott. “A Meteorite Crashes through a Home in Canada, Barely Missing a Woman’s Head.” NPR, 14 Oct. 2021. NPR, https://www.npr.org/2021/10/14/1045990641/meteorite-canada-british-columbia-bed.

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How bacteria create a piggy bank for the lean times – Phys.org

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Cyanophycin biosynthesis looks like a windshield wiper in action: one domain is responsible for adding aspartate (Asp), a second domain is responsible for adding arginine (Arg), two nitrogen-rich amino acids, and the third domain holds on to the growing chain of cyanophycin. Credit: Schmeing lab

Bacteria can store extra resources for the lean times. It’s a bit like keeping a piggy bank or carrying a backup battery pack. One important reserve is known as cyanophycin granules, which were first noticed by an Italian scientist about 150 years ago. He saw big, dark splotches in the cells of the blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) he was studying without understanding either what they were or their purpose. Since then, scientists have realized that cyanophycin was made of a natural green biopolymer, that bacteria use it as a store of nitrogen and energy, and that it could have many biotechnological applications. They have tried producing large amounts of cyanophycin by putting the enzyme that makes it (known as cyanophycin synthetase) in everything from E. coli to tobacco, but without being able to make enough of it to be very useful.

Now, by combining two cutting-edge techniques, cryo-electron microscopy (at McGill’s Facility for Electron Microscopy Research) and X-ray crystallography, McGill researchers have, for the first time, been able to see the active enzyme in action.

“Until now scientists have been unable to understand the way bacterial cells store nitrogen in cyanophycin, simply because they couldn’t see the enzyme in action,” says Martin Schmeing, a Professor in McGill’s Department of Biochemistry and the senior author on a recent paper on the subject in Nature Chemical Biology. “By stitching 3D images of the at work into a movie, we were able to see how three different structural units (or domains), came together to create cyanophycin synthetase. It’s a surprising and very elegant example of a natural biomachine.”

The next steps in the research involve looking at the other enzymes used in the complete and degradation cycle of cyanophycin. Once the researchers are able to see them in action, this would potentially give them a complete structural understanding of the processes involved and would allow them to figure out how to turbocharge to make massive quantities of cyanophycin and related polymers for their green polymer biotech applications, such as in biodegradable water softeners and antiscalants or in the creation of heat-sensitive nanovesicles for use in targeted drug delivery.


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More information:
Itai Sharon et al, Structures and function of the amino acid polymerase cyanophycin synthetase, Nature Chemical Biology (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41589-021-00854-y

Citation:
How bacteria create a piggy bank for the lean times (2021, October 14)
retrieved 15 October 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-10-bacteria-piggy-bank.html

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