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VC Investments In Enterprise Tech And AI – Forbes

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According to Toptal, the venture capital sector has grown by 12.1% annually since the financial crisis. The same source tells us that the amount of capital raised per year has grown by 100% over the decade.

Hundreds of venture capitalists are backing up startups and entrepreneurs with billions of dollars each year. Many businesses rely on these VC investments and entire economies depend on it.

When choosing to back up projects, most investors look for innovation, expertise, and profitable opportunities. I’m going to take a look at some of the top tier venture capitalists and their investments in the field of enterprise tech and AI.

Companies with a focus on AI have collected over 9.3 billion dollars in the US during 2018. The number of venture capital investments keeps growing on a global scale, opening up new opportunities for startups and entrepreneurs who are looking for their golden ticket to the enterprise tech and AI space.

As stated on Kurtosys, venture capital deals ranged between $10 million and $25 million in the US ten years ago. Today, there is a trend of $50 million plus deals getting a greater share of total investment.

Top tier macro venture capitalists in the startup ecosystem include Benchmark, Index Ventures, Felicis Ventures, and Union Square Ventures.

  • Benchmark has thus far made 590 investments with their most recent one being in December of 2019 when over 60 million dollars was invested in Wildlife Studios. They focus on early-stage venture investing in mobile and enterprise tech startups.
  • Index Ventures is a London-based investment group that focuses on early startup investments and business expansion opportunities. Their most notable achievement is the creation of a $1.65 billion fund focused on technology startups. It is worth noting that Index Ventures has already invested in software and cloud storage giants such as Dropbox and Zuora.
  • Must not forget Felicis Ventures, a growing San Francisco-based venture capital firm with a focus on enterprise tech and AI startups. The firm has formed six funds thus far, with their largest fund being worth over $270 million.
  • Lastly, Union Square Ventures is a New York-based investment firm that became one of the top venture capital funds in the world. The company manages investments worth billions of dollars.They focus on startup investments and the financing of all stages of technology startup expansion.

Even micro and local venture capitalists such as Northstar Ventures and Base Ventures are hitting these large numbers. On the local micro VC side, Aybuben Ventures, the first Pan-Armenian venture capitalist fund focused on Armenian tech entrepreneurs.

With a fund of over $50 million, Aybuben Ventures is not limited to people in Armenia only. On the contrary, the fund is open to Armenians all over the world who are engaged in enterprise tech business and development. “Armenians live all over the world and they are proud of their culture and dont want to lose their identity. Potentially this creates a huge global pool of entrepreneurs, professionals, capital, companies and knowledge which can be leveraged and scaled in any of the world’s economies. That said, we welcome interest in our foundation, from any organization and without regard to nationality,” said Alexander Smbatyan, one of the founding partners of Aybuben Ventures.

Overall, the venture capital space keeps growing, providing technology startups with sufficient funding for growth and expansion. “There is an innate disposition to develop companies that make extensive use of technologies such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, biotechnology and more,” Smbatyan added as one of the reasons why it is worth to invest in the space of enterprise tech and AI.

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Groeneveld: Our employees need childcare, public investment is the solution – Vermont Biz

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by Roland Groeneveld We all faced a barrage of unforeseen challenges when the pandemic arrived. As employers who deeply care about our teams, we prioritized the health and safety of our dedicated employees to ensure that their critical on-site work could continue. While we’ve done our best to address each new pandemic-related challenge, there’s one ongoing crisis that we’ve been unable to overcome.

That crisis is childcare. Affordable, high-quality childcare is essential to all Vermonters. Since the pandemic began, childcare has become even more difficult for our employees to find and afford, and for early childhood educators to provide.

Right now, thousands of children and families throughout Vermont can’t access the childcare they need. The scope of this problem encompasses our state’s ability to entice new businesses, create jobs, recruit top talent, and attract more young families and working adults. The childcare crisis is both costing us money and limiting our ability to fill essential roles – a combination that will continue to have long-term ramifications for Vermont employers. But we can change this.

To effectively address the childcare crisis, we need to increase public investments in Vermont’s childcare system for children ages 0 – 5 to make it affordable for families, and to fairly compensate early childhood educators for their essential work.

The childcare advocacy organization Let’s Grow Kids estimates that there are at least 5,000 adults in Vermont who want to re-enter the workforce or increase their working hours but are unable to do so because they can’t find or afford childcare. This is too many Vermonters to exclude from our workforce. Research shows that enabling these parents to enter the workforce would boost Vermont’s economy by at least $375 million year after year.

We chose to build our businesses in Vermont because we love the state’s resilience, grit, and community. Vermont has the quality of life that so many people are looking for and the potential for new businesses to establish themselves here, but only if we can support our workforce with high-quality, affordable and accessible childcare.

That’s why – as business leaders – we’ve endorsed Vermont’s Childcare Campaign and call on other employers to do the same. Declaring your support for the campaign and for public investment in our state’s childcare system is not only the right thing to do for your employees but for Vermont’s economic future.

Roland Groeneveld is the co-founder and Executive Chair of OnLogic in South Burlington, Lisa Groeneveld is the co-founder and Vice Chair of OnLogic, Eli Lesser-Goldsmith is co-owner and Chief Executive Officer of Health Living (locations in South Burlington and Williston), and Nina Lesser-Goldsmith is co-owner and Chief Operations Officer of Healthy Living.

 

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EQB sees mortgage growth moderating following 'tough' quarterly report – Financial Post

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‘Clearly, homebuyers are sitting on the sidelines a little bit more’

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Challenger bank EQB Inc. is expecting growth in conventional loan originations to moderate over the rest of the year as a real estate slowdown weighs on demand.

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In an interview on Wednesday, chief executive Andrew Moor said Equitable Bank — the company’s schedule I bank — has seen some slowing in activity in terms of new mortgage applications, but that that was to be expected with rapidly rising interest rates.

“Clearly, homebuyers are sitting on the sidelines a little bit more,” Moor said, adding that the bank saw weaker results in Ontario, which makes up more than half of its business, while provinces in the west were stronger.

EQB, formerly Equitable Group Inc., nevertheless maintained its full-year guidance for 2022, expressing confidence in meeting its objectives despite sector volatility.

The bank added that it has taken “risk-managed actions” over the first two quarters, which Moor said include being more cautious in areas further from city centres.

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“We’ve been just trimming back a little bit in our risk appetite in some of those areas,” he said.

EQB said it also continued to proactively adjust its underwriting approach to respond to elevated risks from inflation, the Bank of Canada’s response to inflation and its expectations of changing collateral values.

This is a tough quarter report

Andrew Moor

Although still expecting EQB to deliver on its growth targets, some analysts are taking a cautious stance on the mortgage finance sector as risk remains elevated.

“Several factors represent downside risks that will continue to constrain sector valuations and share price performance near term, such as rising regulatory and policy uncertainty, rapid rise in interest rates, and housing market risk,” said Jaeme Gloyn, an analyst at National Bank of Canada Financial Inc., in a note to clients.

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Gloyn cut his estimated target price to $73 per share from $75, while maintaining an “outperform” rating on the stock.

EQB reported strong performance on quarterly net interest income on Tuesday with an all-time record of 15.6 per cent return on equity for the year-to-date period. Conventional lending growth in its core operations grew 36 per cent, year over year.

However, Equitable said severe capital market volatility led to mark-to-market losses of $8.7 million on its non-interest income investment portfolio, which it said was conceived so Equitable Bank can gain access to early-stage technologies.

  1. The penetration of the Canadian reverse mortgage market is lagging behind other developed economies, a DBRS Morningstar report says.

    Reverse mortgage market has plenty of room to grow, but risks abound

  2. Equitable Group Inc. will hike its quarterly dividend after recording its best-ever quarter on the back of strong loan-origination growth.

    Equitable posts best earnings ever as mortgage business stays strong

  3. EQ Bank, a subsidiary of Equitable Group Inc., in Toronto.

    The ‘stealthy enablers’: Canada’s smaller banks court fintechs as industry dynamics shift

  4. EQ Bank, a subsidiary of Equitable Group Inc, in Toronto.

    Takeover of Concentra furthers Equitable’s ‘challenger bank’ ambitions, CEO says

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Moor said the bank is “very much fintech-enabled” and they’ve invested in some of the leading fintechs in Canada, including Borrowell and Wealthsimple.

“This is a tough quarter report. Despite taking a by-the-book approach to achieve and ultimately deliver strong core earnings growth, our efforts put in Q2 are offset by mark-to-market declines primarily in our strategic investment portfolios due to a downdraft in North American equity markets,” Moor said during Wednesday’s earnings call.

EQB said it expects volatility to continue in the second half of 2022, but this does not reflect the underlying strategic value of these investments.

The bank’s adjusted diluted earnings per share for the three months ended June 30 were $1.75, down from $2.64 a year ago.

For the current quarter, Moor said EQB is prioritizing its introduction of EQ Bank’s payment card, the launch of EQ Bank in Québec and its acquisition of Concentra Bank, which is expected to close later in the year.

• Email: dpaglinawan@postmedia.com | Twitter:

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1 Investment You Should Have at Every Age – GOBankingRates

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For a number of reasons, your 50s is the time to start really amping up your retirement savings accounts. Although you hopefully opened a 401(k) or IRA in your 20s or 30s, this is the time to maximize your contributions. For starters, you’re likely at your peak earnings level, so you’ll be able to sock more away without it affecting your lifestyle. Second, once you reach age 50, you’re allowed to make “catch-up” contributions to your retirement plans. For 2022, you can contribute an extra $1,000 to your IRAs, for a total of $7,000 in any given year. But if you have a 401(k) plan, you can kick in an extra $6,500, for a total of $27,000 per year. If you earn enough money to be able to do it, this means you can put $270,000 in your 401(k) plan from age 50 to 60, which can provide a huge boost to your retirement nest egg.

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