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Venezuelan artist brings new value to discarded banknotes

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Venezuelan artist and medical student Elianni Di Gregorio is using old bolivar notes as canvas for her paintings as she strives to give them new value after rampant hyper inflation and successive overhauls saw them discarded.

Di Gregorio, 24, decided to paint on bolivar notes thrown away in the trash to restore some of the currency’s former glory.

Three monetary overhauls since 2008 have cut up to 14 zeros from the currency, pushing vast quantities of notes out of circulation. The most recent overhaul took place in October, when Venezuela’s central bank wiped six zeros from the bolivar.

“I could see how they were throwing incredible amounts of paper money in the trash, which affected me greatly, which is why I decided to reuse them for a different purpose and began to paint on them,” said Di Gregorio, who has used the banknotes as her main canvas since 2017.

In one of her paintings Di Gregorio used a pink 20-bolivar note to reproduce La Fornarina, which depicts a semi-nude woman in one of renaissance artist Raphael’s most important works.

The replica painting will go on show in a virtual exhibition in New York this December after Di Gregorio entered it in a competition, where it was selected alongside nine other works.

“I surprised myself when I managed to do it on something so small,” she said, adding that the Italian Raphael is one of her favorite artists because of his extreme precision.

The paintings let people see the banknotes more positively, instead of the negatives of the economic crisis that has destroyed their value and leading to de facto dollarization, she said.

“This is my way of building the Venezuela I want in the future, restoring value to banknotes that are no longer useful,” Di Gregorio, who also plans to paint on banknotes from other countries, said.

Hyperinflation also prompted artists in Zimbabwe to turn worthless Mugabe-era banknotes into paintings.

 

(Reporting by Johnny Carvajal and Deisy Buitrago; Writing by Oliver Griffin; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

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Lawrence Weiner obituary – The Guardian

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Lawrence Weiner obituary  The Guardian



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Peter Lynch Gives More Than $20 Million In Rare Art To Boston College – Forbes

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Legendary Fidelity investor Peter Lynch has given more than $20 million in art from his and his late wife Carolyn’s private collection to Boston College. The gift includes 27 paintings and three drawings, which will go to Boston College’s McMullen Museum of Art.

The donated art includes pieces by Pablo Picasso, Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Mary Cassatt, Childe Hassam, Albert Bierstadt, Martin Johnson Heade, and Jack Butler Yeats.

In addition to the works of art, Lynch also gave a $5 million grant to support the ongoing curation and exhibition of what will be called the Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch Collection, making the total gift “one of the largest in University history,” according to a press release from the school.

Lynch, former manager of Fidelity’s Magellan fund and current vice chairman of Fidelity, graduated in 1965 from Boston College. He said in the release that he donated the art to inspire students and museum visitors.

“My hope is that this artwork, all of which my wife Carolyn and I collected during our 50 years together, will help students to develop a deeper understanding of art and its importance as a form of expression,” he said.

The collection features a diversity of painting styles. Among the notable pieces are Pablo Picasso’s drawing Head; Winslow Homer’s painting Grace Hoops; Mary Cassatt’s watercolor Mother and Child; John Singer Sargent’s painting Olive Trees, Corfu; and Jack Butler Yeats’s 1929 painting Farewell to Mayo, which the actor Sir Laurence Olivier gave Vivien Leigh as a wedding present.

Theodore E. Stebbins Jr., the consultative curator of American art at Harvard University’s Fogg Museum and the former curator of American paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, called the collection “an extraordinary compilation of artwork.”

Nancy Netzer, the Robert L. and Judith T. Winston Director of the McMullen Museum, called the donation “a transformational gift for the McMullen Museum.” She said the museum would work with Boston College faculty and students and other art scholars to conduct new research on the artwork and share it widely with other audiences.

Lynch said that when he and Carolyn married, they did not have the money to buy fine art so the collection came later. “We cherished having this art in our homes, but it is now time to give it away so that it can be studied and enjoyed by others.”

“I know that the collection was sought after by other museums, but I wanted it to go to my alma mater, which dramatically improved my life, and where my father taught mathematics and physics, my wife proudly received an honorary degree in 2009, and my daughter Annie spent four wonderful and productive years,” he said.

The Lynches have a long history of supporting Boston College. In 1999, they gave more than $10 million to name the Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch School of Education and Human Development. In 2010, their gift of $20 million established The Lynch Leadership Academy, which trains and provides support for principals and aspiring principals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

“I am an extremely lucky person who has been so blessed in life,” said Lynch. “Giving this collection to Boston College is a small way for me to give back.”

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Art honours gold mining past | The Star – Toronto Star

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GOLDENVILLE – There may be less controversial traditions to commemorate, but for one St. Mary’s community, gold mining is not only a matter of local history; it’s in the town’s name. And now it’s recorded on canvas.

The Heritage Goldenville Society is marking the area’s past with a new water colour depiction of the area’s first mineral operation, circa 1860, by Sherbrooke artist Beverly Cameron, called Gold Mining Works at Goldenville.

According to the organization’s chair, Neil Black, proceeds from the sale of a limited number of prints will help support the society’s work to collect and preserve the community’s economic and social legacy. “Our whole source of revenue comes from bringing in donations at the door,” he said. “We have a nice little museum here with all sorts of interesting artifacts.”

Sherbrooke resident Cameron – who has exhibited her art in Fredericton, Saint John and Halifax – said she was happy to undertake the project after speaking with Black and other society members last year. “They offered to pay me, and I said I would be happy to make a donation,” she noted. “Gold on the Eastern Shore is part of our history.”

Between 1862 to 1941, production in the area reportedly topped 200,000 ounces, making Goldenville the unofficial gold capital of the province.

“Thousands of people actually lived and worked around here in those days,” Black said. “Folks spent their money in Sherbrooke, and you had teachers and church people arriving here [because of gold mining].”

Cameron said she had to undertake a bit of sleuthing to draw the picture accurately. “I just went and got a whole lot of different old pictures from the archives they [the Society] provided and put it together,” she explained. “I used line drawing and watercolor. So, what you’re seeing is me doing my very best to represent what it used to look like.”

Atlantic Gold, a subsidiary of Australian mining company St Barbara Ltd., hopes to build an open pit mine along the environmentally sensitive St. Mary’s River. The project has yet to undergo an environmental assessment, but opinions on both sides of the issue are running hot in the area. Despite this, however, Black says he hasn’t received any pushback from the community about the art fundraiser.

“There’s been absolutely none of that,” he stressed. “This was part of our history and it was economically good for the community at the time. And, of course, it was really before anybody had an understanding of environmental waste and damages.”

The society hopes to introduce a “non-invasive” gold panning program for residents and tourists this summer. “We won’t be using any chemicals. We’ll teach people how to pan for gold, and then offer a sourdough’s meal,” Black said. “People can go off and find history with their own hands.”

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