Victoria family focuses on 'letting go, enjoying time together' after dad gets dementia - Surrey Now-Leader - Canada News Media
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Victoria family focuses on 'letting go, enjoying time together' after dad gets dementia – Surrey Now-Leader

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When Walter Strauss, a certified accountant — who with his wife, had spent years creating a magazine with over a million subscribers — started to have trouble with numbers his family knew something was wrong.

“Nobody wanted to believe it, but something wasn’t right,” says Strauss’s daughter, Helga. The family ended up moving back to Canada from the Bahamas to be closer to family. It wasn’t until a year later, in 2018, when Strauss received a formal diagnosis after a long process of tests.

That’s how dementia starts to present itself in people says Tara Speirs with the Alzheimer Society of B.C.

“All of us from time to time forget things,” she says, adding it’s more significant forgetfulness that can be indicative of the disease. “[For example] the person who always starts their day by making coffee and wakes up one morning [not knowing] how to work the coffee maker.”

READ ALSO: Video guide on dealing with dementia snags Island Health two awards

Speirs facilitates a fitness and social program for people living with early-stage dementia and their care partners called Minds in Motion, where she met Strauss.

“When I approached Walter about being a spokesperson for the campaign, he thought about it and the first thing he said to me was ‘Can I tell people I don’t want them to tell me to fight it? I just want to be me’,” says Speirs.

It’s one of the biggest messages the Strauss and Speirs want to share with the public during Alzheimer’s Awareness Month — just because you’ve been diagnosed with the disease, doesn’t mean you can no longer live well.

Since Strauss’s diagnosis, he’s developed an interest in music and even takes line dancing classes in addition to the Minds in Motion class. Helga has learned she can’t correct Strauss when he forgets something and says it’s become about “letting go and enjoying their time together.”’

One in four Canadians surveyed say they would feel ashamed or embarrassed if they had dementia, which is what spurred the need for the Alzheimer Society’s new campaign: I live with dementia, let me help you understand.

Speirs explains there are many kinds of dementia, but says the thing they all have in common is the brain cells and neuropathways in people living with the disease, are dying. The cause of dementia is unknown, with only a small portion of the population diagnosed with the genetic disease Alzheimer’s.

READ ALSO: 6 myths people still believe about dementia

According to the Alzheimer Society, more than half a million people in Canada are living with dementia today, with many more family members who provide care affected as well. Research shows that in the next 12 years, nearly a million Canadians will be living with dementia.

One of the biggest factors leading to the stigmatization of dementia, says Speirs, is how isolating it can be once you’ve been diagnosed. For the first half of the Minds in Motion class, a fitness instructor leads participants in 45 minutes of seated exercise, but the last 45 minutes are focused on connection.

Speirs leads the group in conversation focusing on seasonal topics, most recently the theme was what winter and the holidays were like during the participants’ youth. Another favorite is music bingo with songs from the 1950s.

“I’ve been doing this job for four years, and it’s really difficult to see the disease progressing,” says Spiers. “It’s not a nice disease, and it’s a really cruel reality so we just try to maintain quality of life for as long as possible because there is no cure.”

Minds in Motion is run out of six recreation centers across Greater Victoria, for more information on the program visit bit.ly/2FX5QgZ.

The Alzheimer Society also offers many other support services for those living with dementia and their care partners, such as an outreach call system, a first link dementia helpline — which offers services in Cantonese, Punjabi and Mandarin — along with support groups. For more information on the Society visit alzheimer.ca/en/bc .



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

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Canada prepares for the new coronavirus as the death toll in China keeps rising – meadowlakeNOW

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(File photo/Canadian Press)

By The Canadian Press

Jan 25, 2020

TORONTO — As the new coronavirus claims more lives in China, health authorities in this country are trying to reassure Canadians that plans and procedures are in place to protect them.

While no cases have yet been confirmed in Canada, Dr. Peter Donnelly, with Public Health Ontario, said Friday that it is indeed “likely” the coronavirus, which comes from the same family of viruses as SARS, will arrive here.

However, Donnelly added that health officials are much better prepared now than they were in 2003 when SARS killed 44 Canadians. He noted communications are more robust, hospitals have better isolation facilities, and a reliable test is available to detect the coronavirus within 24 hours.

Health officials are also working with the National Microbiology Lab in Winnipeg to develop an even quicker test, and screening measures have been beefed up at major airports in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal. In addition, everyone is being urged to practice good hygiene that helps prevent the transmission of all viruses — washing hands thoroughly, covering coughs and sneezes, and staying home if you’re sick.

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Man in his 50s first possible case of coronavirus in Ontario – 680 News

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A Toronto hospital is treating a patient suspected to be the first case of coronavirus in Canada.

Dr. Barbara Yaffe, the province’s associate chief medical officer of health, says a man in his 50s who had travelled to Wuhan, China – were the virus outbreak originated – returned to Toronto on Jan. 22 was taken to Toronto’s Sunnybrook Hospital on Jan. 23 and is now in a negative pressure room.

According to Toronto Public Health, the patient is listed in stable condition.

Ontario’s Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. David Williams, said the “risk to Ontarians is low” and the “system is operating as it should.”

“All appropriate infection prevention and control measures were followed by both paramedics and the hospital,” said Williams. “Toronto Public Health is conducting case and contact management and Ontario is in touch with our federal counterparts to help determine exposure to other individuals on the flights.”

Health officials say the man traveled from Pearson airport to a residence using private transportation. They add the man’s wife has not shown any symptoms of the disease at this point.

In China, the virus has infected more 1,200 people and killed 41, reports say.

In an effort to control the spread of the illness, the Chinese government has locked down the city of Wuhan, home to over 11 million people.

Travel has been banned to and from the central-Chinese city. The government has also banned most vehicle use, including private cars, in downtown areas starting Sunday, state media reported. Only authorized vehicles would be permitted, the reports said.

Australia and Malaysia reported their first cases Saturday – four each – and Japan, it’s third. France confirmed three cases Friday, the first in Europe, and the U.S. identified its second, a woman in Chicago who had returned from China.

The new virus comes from a large family of what are known as coronaviruses, some causing nothing worse than a cold. It causes cold and flu-like symptoms, including cough and fever, and in more severe cases, shortness of breath. It can worsen to pneumonia, which can be fatal in some cases.

Here are key things to know following the first presumptive positive case of the coronavirus in Toronto:

WHAT IS IT?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that most often cause mild-to-moderate upper respiratory tract illnesses including the common cold, but they can also lead to severe diseases. Some coronaviruses spread between animals, some pass between animals and people, and others go from people to people.

This new virus is different from the coronaviruses that cause Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS).

WHAT ARE COMMON SYMPTOMS?

This new virus has non-specific symptoms including fever, cough and difficulty breathing.

Typically, coronavirus infections manifest as the common cold. Symptoms can include runny nose, headache, cough, sore throat and fever. Young babies may contract gastrointestinal disease.

Severe cases involve pneumonia, kidney failure and even death.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I SUSPECT INFECTION?

Consult your health care provider as soon as possible if you are worried about symptoms or have travelled to a region where severe coronaviruses are known to occur.

If you have mild cold-like symptoms, health officials encourage you to stay home while sick and avoid close contact to help protect others. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and be sure to throw used tissues in the trash and wash your hands. Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces.

(Sources: Health Canada, Public Health Ontario, World Health Organization)
 
With files from The Canadian Press and Associated Press.

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Health officials announce ‘presumptive’ case of coronavirus in Toronto – Global News

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Ontario health officials have announced that a “presumptive” case of coronavirus has been discovered in Toronto, which if confirmed would mark the first instance of the illness in Canada.

In an evening press conference at Queen’s Park, officials said they were made aware of the case Saturday afternoon.

A man in his 50s tested positive for the virus but secondary testing at Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory will occur to confirm the case.

The victim recently travelled to Wuhan, China, which is believed to be the epicentre of the outbreak.

His condition is stable and he is being treated at Sunnybrook Hospital, officials said.


READ MORE:
Situation in China grave as country scrambles to contain coronavirus: Xi Jinping

“The patient was detected and immediately put in isolation,” Ontario Health Minister Christine Elliott said.

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“Lab tests were conducted and at the earliest signs of a presumptive positive case, Toronto Public Health launched extensive case and contact management to prevent and control further spread of the infection.”

Elliott said officials are working to identify everyone who the victim was in contact with in order to contain the virus.

Officials said any close household contact “has been put into self isolation.”

“Ontarians can rest assured that the province’s integrated health-care system today is far more prepared to respond to any potential health risks than in the past,” Elliott said.






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Coronavirus outbreak: health officials provide details on presumptive case in Toronto


Coronavirus outbreak: health officials provide details on presumptive case in Toronto

“We will continue to diligently monitor this issue to ensure Ontario remains prepared to identify, contain, and treat any additional cases of this virus.”

Ontario’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. David Williams said the patient arrived in Toronto on Jan. 22 after flying from Wuhan with a connection in Guangzhou, China.

Williams said the patient had a family member call 911, at which point they told officials about his symptoms.

“A pair of ambulance services went fully protected,” Williams said.

The man was transported to Sunnybrook hospital on Jan. 23.

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Toronto Mayor John Tory responded to the news of the case in a statement Saturday evening.

“While we now have one presumptive confirmed case, our health officials are clear that the risk to residents continues to remain low,” he said in part.

“Toronto Public Health is continuing to work closely with provincial and federal health colleagues to actively monitor the situation and respond as appropriate.”

The illness has sickened more than 1,200 people and killed at least 41 in China.

Australia and Malaysia reported their first cases Saturday — four each– and Japan, its third.

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France confirmed three cases Friday, the first in Europe, and the U.S. identified its second, a woman in Chicago who had returned from China.

– With files from the Canadian Press

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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