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Video of black light experiment shows how fast a virus can spread in a restaurant setting – Yahoo Style

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Video of a black light experiment designed to show how fast a virus can spread in a restaurant setting is quickly going viral.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The video, which was shot in Japan by the public broadcasting organization NHK, features 10 people going through a simulation designed to mimic the atmosphere in a pre-pandemic buffet restaurant or cruise ship.” data-reactid=”17″>The video, which was shot in Japan by the public broadcasting organization NHK, features 10 people going through a simulation designed to mimic the atmosphere in a pre-pandemic buffet restaurant or cruise ship.

In the video, one person is designed as the “infected” patient and is given a special black light-ready solution to rub into his hands. (The solution is invisible without a black light, so participants in the demonstration can’t see it during the simulation.) Then, everyone in the experiment does what people normally do at a buffet restaurant — they dish up food, eat chat, and drink. At the end of the video, a black light is turned on, and you can see the “virus” just about everywhere. It shows up on utensils, cups, food and even on some participants’ faces. 

Experts say this is definitely worth paying attention to.

“This is an accurate illustration of how many commonly touched surfaces there are and how many opportunities there are for viruses to spread,” Dr. Amesh A. Adalja, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, tells Yahoo Life.

However, he says, just because germs show up on surfaces doesn’t actually mean they’ll make a person sick. “If all of these types of interactions were major drivers of illness, it would be unsafe to be in public in general under any circumstances,” he says. “Not every one of those commonly-touched surfaces translates into an infection, but it can.”

This particular simulation places a lot of emphasis on touch as a way to spread germs, but some viruses —like SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 — are mostly spread through respiratory droplets in the air, Dr. Richard Watkins, an infectious disease physician and professor of internal medicine at the Northeast Ohio Medical University, tells Yahoo Life.

“COVID-19 is most contagious when it is in the air from an infected person coughing or speaking,” he says.

Adalja agrees. “With coronavirus, it’s important to remember that the main driver of infection is interacting with individuals who are sick, including with those who are coughing and sneezing,” Adalja says. “It’s less about what people touch.”

This experiment also used a buffet line — with shared serving utensils — which comes with an increased risk of spreading a virus, Adalja says.

As states open up and people dine out more, Adalja says it’s important for would-be restaurant customers to remember that COVID-19 and other viruses will still be circulating. That’s why he recommends diners do their best to practice social distancing from other patrons, and to try to opt for outdoor seating when it’s available. “Wash your hands a lot — and try to refrain from touching your face,” he says.

But ultimately, Watkins recommends that people refrain from dining out right now. “Ordering carryout and staying home is best,” he says.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="For the latest coronavirus news and updates, follow along at https://news.yahoo.com/coronavirus. According to experts, people over 60 and those who are immunocompromised continue to be the most at risk. If you have questions, please reference the CDC’s and WHO’s resource guides.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”37″>For the latest coronavirus news and updates, follow along at https://news.yahoo.com/coronavirus. According to experts, people over 60 and those who are immunocompromised continue to be the most at risk. If you have questions, please reference the CDC’s and WHO’s resource guides. 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more from Yahoo Life” data-reactid=”52″>Read more from Yahoo Life

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One new COVID-19 case announced Monday – HalifaxToday.ca

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NEWS RELEASE
COVID-19/HEALTH/WELLNESS
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As of today, June 1, Nova Scotia has 1,057 confirmed cases of COVID-19. One new case was identified Sunday, May 31.

The QEII Health Sciences Centre’s microbiology lab completed 626 Nova Scotia tests on May 31 and is operating 24-hours.

There is one licensed long-term care home in Nova Scotia with active cases of COVID-19. Northwood in Halifax currently has 10 residents and four staff active cases.

The list of symptoms being screened for has recently expanded. If you have any one of the following symptoms, visit https://811.novascotia.ca to determine if you should call 811 for further assessment:
— fever (i.e. chills, sweats)
— cough or worsening of a previous cough
— sore throat
— headache
— shortness of breath
— muscle aches
— sneezing
— nasal congestion/runny nose
— hoarse voice
— diarrhea
— unusual fatigue
— loss of sense of smell or taste
— red, purple or blueish lesions on the feet, toes or fingers without clear cause

To date, Nova Scotia has 42,426 negative test results, 1,057 positive COVID-19 test results and 60 deaths. Confirmed cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. Six individuals are currently in hospital, two of those in ICU. Nine-hundred and eighty-four individuals have now recovered and their cases of COVID-19 are considered resolved. Cases have been identified in all parts of the province. A map and graphic presentation of the case data is available at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data .

Public health is working to identify and test people who may have come in close contact with the confirmed cases. Those individuals who have been confirmed are being directed to self-isolate at home, away from the public, for 14 days.

Anyone who has travelled outside Nova Scotia must self-isolate for 14 days. As always, any Nova Scotian who develops symptoms of acute respiratory illness should limit their contact with others until they feel better.

It remains important for Nova Scotians to strictly adhere to the public health order and directives – practise good hand washing and other hygiene steps, maintain a physical distance of two metres or six feet from those not in your household or family household bubble and limit planned gatherings of people outside your household or family household bubble to no more than 10.

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus .

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen at https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia/ .

Quick Facts:
— testing numbers are updated daily at https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus
— a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22 and extended to June 14

Additional Resources:
Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus

Government of Canada toll-free information line 1-833-784-4397

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll-free)

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7, by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free)

For help or information about domestic violence 24/7, call 1-855-225-0220 (toll-free)
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NB health authority CEO says COVID-19 outbreak is 'worst possible scenario' – OHS Canada

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By Holly McKenzie-Sutter in St. John’s, N.L. with files from Jillian Kestler-D’Amours in Montreal

FREDERICTON — The chief executive of a New Brunswick health network says the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak in the north of the province is a worst-case scenario in a region with underlying health issues and an older population.

Testing for the novel coronavirus has been ramped up in the Campbellton area, with two arenas becoming makeshift testing centres after officials confirmed a health-care professional travelled to Quebec and returned to work without self-isolating.

The worker has tested positive for COVID-19, and he has been linked to a growing cluster of cases.

Eight cases have been linked to the cluster that as of Friday has led to the adjournment of the provincial legislature, the rollback of reopening measures and prompted the opening of a testing centre across the border in Quebec.

Gilles Lanteigne, president and CEO of the Vitalite Health Network, said the incident that sparked the “massive” testing operation speaks to the importance of abiding by public health measures that have been introduced to slow the spread of the virus.

“We were expecting we would have a fallback at some time or another. Did we expect that? This is probably the worst scenario we could have had,” Lanteigne said by phone on Friday.

Caution urged

Until the latest outbreak, New Brunswick had been loosening restrictions, with nearly all of its positive COVID-19 cases considered resolved.

Health authorities announced two additional cases Friday, bringing the total in the region known as Zone 5 to eight, with two patients in intensive care.

Chief medical officer of health Dr. Jennifer Russell said one of the newly diagnosed individuals is a health-care worker in their 30s who works in a nursing home, where patients and staff were being tested Friday. The other new case is a person in their 60s.

She warned all New Brunswickers to be cautious, saying contract tracing has found that people living outside the northern region are within the transmission circle. She said the quickly emerging cluster, which is expected to grow, shows that people will be living with the pandemic for a long time.

Lanteigne said wide testing is essential in the region because Campbellton is known to have high rates of chronic health conditions and smoking, putting the population at greater risk of complications from COVID-19.

“It’s a very vulnerable population,” he said. “We need to know where this virus is at in the community. We’re very, very concerned.”

Lanteigne confirmed the health-care professional thought to be patient zero in the outbreak has been suspended from work indefinitely after coming into contact with more than 100 people.

He declined to confirm the man’s professional title, citing privacy concerns in the small community, but said he worked directly with patients at the Campbellton Regional Hospital.

More than 200 people were tested Thursday evening, and Lanteigne said the health authority is on track to exceed its target of 500 tests over the weekend.

Elective surgeries have been suspended, and ambulances are being diverted to another hospital. Zone 5 has been moved back to the “orange” phase of the province’s reopening plan, with previous restrictions reinstated.

“We’re treating this zone as a hot zone,” Lanteigne said.

Health worker criticized

Campbellton is on the Quebec border, and some residents have complained about restrictions that have limited travel between the two provinces.

Across the river from Campbellton, the health authority in Quebec’s Gaspe region is also setting up a COVID-19 testing unit in Pointe-a-la-Croix.

CISSS Gaspesie spokesperson Clemence Beaulieu-Gendron said the health authority believes some residents of Pointe-a-la-Croix were in contact with the New Brunswick health professional who tested positive for COVID-19, but it is unclear how many.

She said there are currently no active COVID-19 cases in Pointe-a-la-Croix.

Lanteigne remarked that the incident should be a wake-up call for community members who, despite “warnings and warnings,” were reluctant to wear masks and were demanding that travel restrictions be loosened.

“Now, here we are. One incident. This is what we’ve been saying all along,” Lanteigne said.

Premier Blaine Higgs has criticized the worker at the centre of the cluster as “irresponsible.” He said this week that information had been passed to the RCMP and suggested the individual could be charged with violating public health orders.

Cpl. Jullie Rogers-Marsh, spokeswoman for the New Brunswick RCMP, confirmed Friday that the force “is aware of incident and is looking into the matter.” She would not give details about what potential violations were being considered.

At Friday’s COVID-19 briefing, Higgs softened his tone slightly, saying any professional or legal consequences will be dealt with by the person’s employer and law enforcement.

“I know people are upset, but we don’t want anyone taking matters into their own hands,” he said, adding that people with symptoms should not be afraid to come forward and seek testing.

Russell also avoided sharing specifics about the health-care worker’s job title and declined to say whether the nursing home employee had been working in other facilities.

Higgs said the travel incident is being investigated to determine what was said at the border and whether the rules were followed.

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At least 21 employees at St. Catharines greenhouse test positive for COVID-19 – Newstalk 610 CKTB (iHeartRadio)

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At least 21 employees at a St. Catharines greenhouse have tested positive for COVID-19.

Officials with Pioneer Flower Farms say they began testing all employees after three offshore workers began to show symptoms of the virus.

When the results came back, an additional 18 employees tested positive.

Officials say they are planning to continue paying all employees who are entering into self isolation for the next two weeks.

Preventative measures are in place and officials are introducing further methods to limit the spread.

Pioneer Flower Farms employs more than 80 workers.

It was also the scene of a devastating fire last year that destroyed a greenhouse and the residences of migrant workers.

At the time, Fire Chief Jeff McCormick called it ‘the most significant fire that I’ve had in my 33 year career.’

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