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Watch SpaceX launch a U.S. spy satellite live and bring its booster back for a landing on terra firma – Yahoo Movies Canada

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Dr. Regina Rabinovich Succeeds Dr. Axel Hoos as Sabin Vaccine Institute Board Chair, Drs. Norman Baylor and JoAnn Suzich Join the Board

Washington DC, Dec. 17, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin) is pleased to announce the Board of Trustees has unanimously elected Regina Rabinovich, MD, MPH, as board chair and elected two new trustees, Dr. Norman Baylor and Dr. JoAnn Suzich, to strengthen the organization’s leadership in global immunization and vaccine research and development. Dr. Rabinovich has served on the board since November 2015, and as chair of the Governance Committee since 2016.Dr. Rabinovich brings deep global health expertise to the role, with more than three decades of experience in the health and philanthropic sectors. She is currently the ExxonMobil Malaria Scholar in Residence at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In addition, Dr. Rabinovich is chair of the Malaria Eradication Scientific Alliance at ISGlobal, University of Barcelona, where she also serves as director of the Malaria Elimination Initiative.Previously, Dr. Rabinovich spent nearly a decade as director of the infectious diseases division at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, overseeing the product development and implementation of strategies to prevent and control infectious diseases. She also held senior positions at the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and served as director of the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative.Dr. Rabinovich takes on the role of board chair from Axel Hoos, MD, who has been a member of the board since 2006 and has served as chair since January 2014.In his six years as board chair, Dr. Hoos led Sabin through a significant and successful transition, with recruitment of new executive leadership, and development and execution of a new strategy that has resulted in the growth of Sabin’s team, funding and programs, including the successful relaunch of Sabin’s vaccine research and development program. Dr. Hoos is senior vice president, R&D governance chair and therapeutic area head for Oncology at GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). Dr. Hoos continues to serve on the board as a trustee, re-elected alongside Wendy Commins Holman, CEO and founder of Ridgeback Biotherapeutics, who joined the board in 2017.“I am honored to have served Sabin as chair during a time of great change and growth,” said Dr. Hoos. “I am proud of what Sabin has achieved during my tenure and am confident in the future of the organization under Gina’s capable leadership.”“I speak for the entire board in thanking Axel for his vision and dedication to Sabin,” said Dr. Rabinovich. “His leadership has been invaluable in establishing a firm foundation to build upon as we move forward into the organization’s next phase. As desperately needed COVID-19 vaccines become a reality, the Sabin team looks forward to taking an active role in ensuring equity in the global rollout of these vaccines and continuing our work to prevent future pandemics.”Joining the board as trustees are vaccine research and development veterans Norman Baylor, PhD, and JoAnn Suzich, PhD, whose expertise will strengthen Sabin as a non-profit organization developing vaccines against diseases that impact populations in low- and middle-income settings.   Dr. Norman Baylor is President and CEO of Biologics Consulting Group, Inc. Prior to this, he spent more than 20 years at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), most recently as Director of the Office of Vaccines Research and Review in the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Dr. Baylor’s expertise in the development and licensure of new vaccines will be valuable to Sabin as the organization’s vaccine research and development program advances novel vaccines into clinical trials.“I am honored to join the Sabin board to help advance the vaccines currently being developed and identify new vaccine development opportunities,” said Dr. Baylor. “The present moment has made it abundantly clear how vital vaccines are for our global health, and I am glad to have the opportunity to contribute to research-based interventions as a part of the Sabin team.”Dr. JoAnn Suzich brings more than 30 years of experience in infectious diseases and vaccine research to Sabin, with a focus on translating science into global solutions for patient care. Dr. Suzich currently serves as head of research at Immunocore after an impressive career at AstraZeneca/MedImmune, where she started her career as a scientist and was elevated to vice president and then therapeutic head before retiring last year. “As a patient-focused scientist, I am excited to join an organization that works on behalf of people in low-income settings worldwide, including close collaboration with Sabin’s vaccine development team. I look forward to helping Sabin realize its mission of making vaccines accessible to everyone, everywhere,” Suzich commented.Baylor and Suzich join Hoos and Rabinovich, CEO Amy Finan, Elizabeth Fox, Wendy Commins Holman, Jeffrey P. Libson, Saad Omer, David Salisbury, Jaqueline Shea and Peter L. Thoren as Sabin Board Trustees. Learn more at www.sabin.org/board-trustees.  About the Sabin Vaccine Institute The Sabin Vaccine Institute is a leading advocate for expanding vaccine access and uptake globally, advancing vaccine research and development, and amplifying vaccine knowledge and innovation. Unlocking the potential of vaccines through partnership, Sabin has built a robust ecosystem of funders, innovators, implementers, practitioners, policy makers and public stakeholders to advance its vision of a future free from preventable diseases. As a non-profit with more than two decades of experience, Sabin is committed to finding solutions that last and extending the full benefits of vaccines to all people, regardless of who they are or where they live. At Sabin, we believe in the power of vaccines to change the world. For more information, visit www.sabin.org and follow us on Twitter, @SabinVaccine. About Norman Baylor, PhDDr. Norman W. Baylor is an expert in the development and licensure of new vaccines, evaluating numerous vaccines throughout his career including vaccines for acellular pertussis, varicella, pneumococcal conjugate, human papillomavirus (HPV), influenza and shingles. He is currently the president and CEO of Biologics Consulting Group, Inc, where he is responsible for the overall management and strategic direction of the company. Prior to this, he spent 20 years at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), most recently as Director of the Office of Vaccines Research and Review (OVRR) in the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER). In this role, he oversaw all facets of the clinical and product regulatory review activity, including quality assurance and oversight of review functions in addition to planning, developing and administering CBER’s broad national and international programs and operational activities for vaccines and related products. Dr. Baylor served as FDA’s liaison to CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Vaccine Advisory Committee, and the Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines. He served on the board of the Infectious Disease Research Institute and continues to serve as an expert advisor to the World Health Organization on several global vaccine initiatives. Dr. Baylor received his bachelor’s degree in medical microbiology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and his master’s degree and doctorate in microbial genetics and molecular microbiology, respectively, from the University of Kentucky. About JoAnn Suzich, PhDDr. JoAnn Suzich is an influential biotechnology leader with real-world experience translating science into global solutions for patient care with a focus on developing vaccines and antibodies against many of the deadly and debilitating viruses. Her work has played a critical role in the advancement and treatment of health issues affecting women and children. She currently serves as Head of Research at Immunocore after an impressive career at AstraZeneca/MedImmune where she started as a bench scientist and was elevated to Vice President and then Therapeutic Head before retiring in 2019. During her tenure as Vice President for Research & Development at MedImmune, she was responsible for research on novel vaccines, as well as overseeing the company’s research in the development of antibodies and antibody-like molecules for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases including RSV, influenza, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. As Research Director, Dr. Suzich managed the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine program from its inception to out-licensing following Phase 1 clinical trials.  She also serves as an advisor for organizations such as the Human Vaccines Project and the Global Women’s Health Institute at Purdue University. Dr. Suzich earned a doctorate in biochemistry from Purdue University and a bachelor’s degree in biology from Susquehanna University, where she now serves on the Board of Trustees.    CONTACT: Mary Beth Woodin Sabin Vaccine Institute +1 (202) 662-1841 press@sabin.org

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NASA to Host Virtual Briefing on February Perseverance Mars Rover Landing – Stockhouse

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WASHINGTON , Jan. 15, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — NASA is hosting a media briefing on Wednesday, Jan. 27 , at 4:30 p.m. EST to discuss the upcoming landing of the Mars 2020 Perseverance rover. The event will air live on NASA TV, the agency’s website, and YouTube .

NASA Logo. (PRNewsFoto/NASA) (PRNewsFoto/) (PRNewsfoto/NASA)

Perseverance lands Feb. 18 , carrying new science instruments and technologies, including the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter on its belly. Perseverance will use a drill on the end of its robotic arm to capture rock and regolith (broken rock and dust) samples in metal tubes, which will be deposited on the surface of Mars for a future mission to collect and return to Earth. The rover will seek signs of ancient life on the Red Planet as a primary goal.

Perseverance was built and managed for NASA by the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California .

Participating in the briefing are:

  • Thomas Zurbuchen , associate administrator, Science Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters
  • Lori Glaze , director, Planetary Science Division, NASA Headquarters
  • Matt Wallace , Mars 2020 deputy project manager, JPL
  • Allen Chen , Mars 2020 entry, descent, and landing lead, JPL
  • Ken Farley , Mars 2020 project scientist, Caltech
  • Briony Horgan, Mars 2020 science team member, Purdue University

Media who would like to ask questions via phone during the event must provide their name and affiliation by noon EST Tuesday, Jan. 26 , to Rexana Vizza at rexana.v.vizza@jpl.nasa.gov .

Media and the public also may ask questions on social media during the briefing using #CountdownToMars.

To learn more about Perseverance, visit:

https://nasa.gov/perseverance

and

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

Cision View original content to download multimedia: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nasa-to-host-virtual-briefing-on-february-perseverance-mars-rover-landing-301209516.html

SOURCE NASA

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NASA Curiosity rover celebrates 3000th day on Mars with stunning panorama of planet – Barrie 360 – Barrie 360

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Sophie Lewis – CBS News

NASA’s Curiosity rover just celebrated a major milestone — 3,000 days on the surface of Mars. To mark the occasion, the space agency has released a stunning new panorama of the red planet, captured by the rover. 

Curiosity landed on Mars on August 6, 2012. However, scientists track its activities in Martian days, called “sols,” which are a bit longer than Earth days, at 24 hours and 39 minutes. 

The epic new panorama, released by the space agency on Tuesday, captures the view of the 96-mile-wide Gale Crater and part of Mount Sharp, its central mountain. It was taken by Curiosity’s eyes, AKA the Mast Camera. 

This panorama, made up of 122 individual images stitched together, was taken by NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover on November 18, 2020, the 2,946th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. NASA/JPL-CALTECH/MSSS

Curiosity has been gradually climbing and exploring the 3-mile-tall Mount Sharp since 2014. Its most recent find, captured in the panorama, is a series of distinctive “bench-like rock formations,” which can form due to erosion, as well as landslides. 

The mountain’s rock layers were shaped by bodies of water billions of years ago. “Curiosity’s team has seen benches before in Gale Crater, but rarely forming such a scenic grouping of steps,” NASA said.  

“Our science team is excited to figure out how they formed and what they mean for the ancient environment within Gale,” said Curiosity’s project scientist, Ashwin Vasavada of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 

The panorama is actually a composite of 122 images taken by Curiosity on November 18. After it was taken, the rover continued to higher ground, working its way toward the next major layer, called the “sulfate-bearing unit.” 

Since its mission began, Curiosity has been in search of conditions that may have once supported life, gathering rock samples along the way to analyze.

It’s had a number of major accomplishments, including finding evidence the planet once had persistent liquid water, discovering that the planet was once suitable for life and finding organic carbon molecules, the building blocks of life. It also found present and active methane in the red planet’s atmosphere, detected radiation levels that could post health risks to humans, and concluded that Mars’ atmosphere used to be much thicker than it is today. 

Curiosity will soon be joined by its sibling rover, Perseverance, when it lands on the red planet in February. Perseverance is designed to bring samples from Mars back to Earth, marking the first round-trip mission to another planet.

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In Photos: Hubble Captures Echoes Of Violent Supernova ‘Fireworks’ That Lit-Up Night Sky In The Third Century – Forbes

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The Hubble Space Telescope has captured light from a supernova blast—an exploding star—that would have been seen from Earth 1,700 years ago.

Although there are no known records of anyone seeing it, a cosmic explosion that’s been compared to fireworks would have been visible to people in Earth’s southern hemisphere.

It’s now visible to the Hubble Space telescope as a delicate greenish-blue shell—a supernova remnant (SNR)—in a nearby galaxy to the Milky Way called the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC).

The SNR is called 1E0102.2-7219, or E0102 for short. Here’s everything you need to know about how Hubble’s spectacular images have been used to precisely date an incredible supernova explosion.

What and where is E0102?

E0102 is the leftovers of a massive explosion of a star in a nearby dwarf galaxy—the SMC.

The images from Hubble show the aftermath of a supernova—the dissipating energy has created a spectacular display of greenish-blue filaments.

The above image of part of the SMC shows that E0102 is “close”—about 50 light-years—from a massive star-forming region of glowing hydrogen emission called N 76 and Henize. You can see that as the pink-ish section in the upper-right of the image. E0102 is at the center of the image.

What do we know about the star?

Not much, though it may have been a Wolf-Rayet star—a very large and old star made from heavy elements that had probably blown-off its hydrogen before the explosion.

Astronomers think that because the colors of E0102 indicate that it was rich in oxygen rather than hydrogen and helium.

How did astronomers use Hubble’s images?

Although E0102 was previously known about, its age was unknown. Treating E0102 as forensic evidence, astronomers used Hubble’s observations of E0102 taken a decade apart to calculate the cloud’s expansion rate.

They did that by calculating how fast 22 separate oxygen-rich knots of debris in the SNR had moved in 10 years. They then traced it back to the point in space where the progenitor star must have exploded.

Why Hubble’s longevity was so crucial

“A prior study compared images taken years apart with two different cameras on Hubble, the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS),” said Danny Milisavljevic of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, one of the leaders of the research team whose paper was presented yesterday at the 237th meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

“But our study compares data taken with the same camera, the ACS, making the comparison much more robust; the knots were much easier to track using the same instrument,” he said.

“It’s a testament to the longevity of Hubble that we could do such a clean comparison of images taken 10 years apart.”

What is the SMC?

The Small Magellanic Cloud is a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. It’s about 200,000 light-years away in the constellation Tucana. It’s really easy to see in the night skies in the southern hemisphere.

Wishing you clear skies and wide eyes.

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